linux video server - Ubuntu

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  1. linux video server

    How do I make a video server?

    I have several movies in avi or mpeg format stored on my hard drive, and
    want to display them on my tv.

    I can't find a dedicated video server in the linux community. I found
    Mythubuntu, mythtv, and something else....but they are personal video
    recorder / player units.

    I can play the movies on my other computers by browsing to this machine
    and opening a movie in a player(wimamp/divx/real,etc.)

    Eventually, I'd like to feed video into my house cable and have a menu
    on each tv to select which movie to watch.

    Maybe I'm just not understanding MythUbuntu's capabilities.


    technomaNge
    --

  2. Re: linux video server

    technomaNge said the following on 2008-10-21 03:58:
    > How do I make a video server?


    VLC
    http://www.videolan.org/vlc/streaming.html

  3. Re: linux video server

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 20:58:39 -0500, technomaNge wrote:

    > How do I make a video server?
    >
    > I have several movies in avi or mpeg format stored on my hard drive, and
    > want to display them on my tv.
    >
    > I can't find a dedicated video server in the linux community. I found
    > Mythubuntu, mythtv, and something else....but they are personal video
    > recorder / player units.
    >
    > I can play the movies on my other computers by browsing to this machine
    > and opening a movie in a player(wimamp/divx/real,etc.)
    >
    > Eventually, I'd like to feed video into my house cable and have a menu
    > on each tv to select which movie to watch.
    >
    > Maybe I'm just not understanding MythUbuntu's capabilities.
    >
    >
    > technomaNge


    This is something I have thought about, too.

    The first thing you need is to have your TV connected to a small computer,
    that can communicate with other computers over the home LAN. This small
    computer could run MythTV (or Mythbuntu) to provide a menu, communicate
    with the computer that actually stores the avi files, etc. Of course, as
    with any VCR, you need a way to switch between the live feed and the PVR
    feed.

    Right now, I just burn whatever movie I want to watch to a DVD and stick
    it in the DVD player to watch. Not exactly elegant, but it's simple and
    it works. If I had a DVD player that played the avi files directly, that
    would be even better.

    The main stumbling block, for me, is finding a computer case/mobo with a
    small enough form factor to sit unobtrusively near my TV, along with all
    the other video boxes.

    --
    MarkA
    Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
    About eight o'clock


  4. Re: linux video server

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 20:58:39 -0500, technomaNge wrote:

    > How do I make a video server?
    >
    > I have several movies in avi or mpeg format stored on my hard drive, and
    > want to display them on my tv.
    >
    > I can't find a dedicated video server in the linux community. I found
    > Mythubuntu, mythtv, and something else....but they are personal video
    > recorder / player units.
    >
    > I can play the movies on my other computers by browsing to this machine
    > and opening a movie in a player(wimamp/divx/real,etc.)
    >
    > Eventually, I'd like to feed video into my house cable and have a menu
    > on each tv to select which movie to watch.
    >
    > Maybe I'm just not understanding MythUbuntu's capabilities.
    >
    >
    > technomaNge


    Myth TV will do what you want. It is split into two parts - a 'backend'
    which collects the data (TV, ripped CD, etc) and a 'frontend', which
    picks up the streamed data file and displays it. Both parts can be run
    on one machine to make something like a complex PVR from a computer.

    Mythbuntu is Myth confiogured on Ubuntu, so you should get a nearly
    working system out of the box (or off the disc! 8-). Linux Format
    magazine has this on its 'free' DVD in the November issue. As Myth TV is
    supposed to be rather particular to configure, that may be a good route
    to start playing around with it.

    Keith

  5. Re: linux video server

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2008 08:32:58 -0400, MarkA wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 20:58:39 -0500, technomaNge wrote:
    >
    >> How do I make a video server?
    >>
    >> I have several movies in avi or mpeg format stored on my hard drive, and
    >> want to display them on my tv.
    >>
    >> I can't find a dedicated video server in the linux community. I found
    >> Mythubuntu, mythtv, and something else....but they are personal video
    >> recorder / player units.
    >>
    >> I can play the movies on my other computers by browsing to this machine
    >> and opening a movie in a player(wimamp/divx/real,etc.)
    >>
    >> Eventually, I'd like to feed video into my house cable and have a menu
    >> on each tv to select which movie to watch.
    >>
    >> Maybe I'm just not understanding MythUbuntu's capabilities.
    >>
    >>
    >> technomaNge

    >
    > This is something I have thought about, too.
    >
    > The first thing you need is to have your TV connected to a small computer,
    > that can communicate with other computers over the home LAN. This small
    > computer could run MythTV (or Mythbuntu) to provide a menu, communicate
    > with the computer that actually stores the avi files, etc. Of course, as
    > with any VCR, you need a way to switch between the live feed and the PVR
    > feed.
    >
    > Right now, I just burn whatever movie I want to watch to a DVD and stick
    > it in the DVD player to watch. Not exactly elegant, but it's simple and
    > it works. If I had a DVD player that played the avi files directly, that
    > would be even better.
    >
    > The main stumbling block, for me, is finding a computer case/mobo with a
    > small enough form factor to sit unobtrusively near my TV, along with all
    > the other video boxes.


    After poking around a little more, I came upon the Neuros, available from
    Newegg for $155. It does what you could do by building a small computer
    running Mythbuntu, but I couldn't build one for $155. The only question
    is if it is DRM-free or not. I seem to remember a while back hearing
    about it, and that it ran some flavor of Linux, but I will have to do more
    research.

    --
    MarkA
    Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
    About eight o'clock


  6. Re: linux video server

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2008 07:32:58 -0500, MarkA wrote:

    > If I had a DVD player that played the avi files directly, that
    > would be even better.


    I bought a DVD player which plays absolutely "everything" you can burn:
    mp3, mp4, avi, divx and more. I can get several movies on one DVD. I use
    this approach all time. No, it's not elegant, but 10 mintues after I have
    a movie on my laptop I can run it on my TV. You can pick up a DVD player
    like this for around $50 these days, so it doesn't set you back much
    either.

    --
    //ceed

  7. Re: linux video server: Neuros OSD

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2008 12:26:15 -0400, MarkA wrote:

    I've been poking around, and found out quite a few things about the Neuros
    OSD 1.0 (http://www.neurostechnology.com/) Check it out!

    It is: Open, Linux baseed, designed to be "hacked", they make a SDK
    available, version 2.0 is coming out soon with HDTV support, there is a
    very active users/developers forum (http://forums.neurostechnology.com/;
    12198 Posts in 2261 Topics by 24211 Members), AND a blog for firmware
    hackers (http://open.neurostechnology.com/)

    The device will take video/audio from virtually any source, convert it
    to/from virtually any format, and allow it to be stored on virtually any
    media, including display on your TV or storage on a network server.

    I'm surprised I don't have one yet. I'll be remedying that situation
    shortly. For under $200, it sounds like the perfect device for getting
    video onto your home LAN.

    --
    MarkA
    Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
    About eight o'clock


  8. Re: linux video server

    On 2008-10-21, technomaNge wrote:
    > How do I make a video server?
    >
    > I have several movies in avi or mpeg format stored on my hard drive, and
    > want to display them on my tv.
    >
    > I can't find a dedicated video server in the linux community. I found
    > Mythubuntu, mythtv, and something else....but they are personal video
    > recorder / player units.
    >
    > I can play the movies on my other computers by browsing to this machine
    > and opening a movie in a player(wimamp/divx/real,etc.)
    >
    > Eventually, I'd like to feed video into my house cable and have a menu
    > on each tv to select which movie to watch.
    >
    > Maybe I'm just not understanding MythUbuntu's capabilities.


    Maybe you are just not understanding computer capabilities... Cause
    that's not how it works.

    You need a device at the TV to do the decoding. It can be a PC, or a
    media player (Linksys and D-Link both sell popular ones), or you can
    use a PS3 or XBox. With some work, you can even get a Tivo to do
    it...

    Myth can work as a server, a client or both. Where you have a TV
    signal for it, you set up the server (with a tuner card). This
    machine can also be a client (if it is, say, at your TV). This
    machine can also be configured to play video from a network location
    (obviously, another PC on the LAN that has the avi and mpg files).

    Currently, because Ubuntu doesn't like my laptop's video card at the
    resolution I need for my TV, I use Windows Media Center. In my
    experience, Myth is far more powerful (and stable), but Media Center
    does the job all right. I have it set to monitor the /videos share on
    my server, where all of my downloaded or created videos are, and it
    stores all of it's recorded content to a USB hard drive connected to
    the laptop.

    The easiest way to get Myth working right is to download and use
    Mythbuntu or Knoppmyth.

    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  9. Re: linux video server

    On 2008-10-21, MarkA wrote:
    >
    > This is something I have thought about, too.
    >
    > The first thing you need is to have your TV connected to a small computer,
    > that can communicate with other computers over the home LAN. This small
    > computer could run MythTV (or Mythbuntu) to provide a menu, communicate
    > with the computer that actually stores the avi files, etc. Of course, as
    > with any VCR, you need a way to switch between the live feed and the PVR
    > feed.
    >
    > Right now, I just burn whatever movie I want to watch to a DVD and stick
    > it in the DVD player to watch. Not exactly elegant, but it's simple and
    > it works. If I had a DVD player that played the avi files directly, that
    > would be even better.
    >
    > The main stumbling block, for me, is finding a computer case/mobo with a
    > small enough form factor to sit unobtrusively near my TV, along with all
    > the other video boxes.
    >


    http://www.mwave.com/mwave/Skusearch...iteria=BA24741

    This is quite a bargain. You'll need CPU/Mem/HDD/Optical drive.
    You'll also want a TV Tuner card if you are planning to use it as a
    PVR as well...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  10. Re: linux video server

    Joe wrote:
    > On 2008-10-21, technomaNge wrote:
    >> How do I make a video server?
    >>


    > Maybe you are just not understanding computer capabilities... Cause
    > that's not how it works.
    >
    > You need a device at the TV to do the decoding. It can be a PC, or a
    > media player (Linksys and D-Link both sell popular ones), or you can
    > use a PS3 or XBox. With some work, you can even get a Tivo to do
    > it...
    >
    > Myth can work as a server, a client or both. Where you have a TV
    > signal for it, you set up the server (with a tuner card). This
    > machine can also be a client (if it is, say, at your TV). This
    > machine can also be configured to play video from a network location
    > (obviously, another PC on the LAN that has the avi and mpg files).
    >
    > The easiest way to get Myth working right is to download and use
    > Mythbuntu or Knoppmyth.
    >


    Thanks, that explains some of the things I couldn't figure out.
    I'll put the Mythbuntu server in my equipment room. I have ethernet
    to all rooms for transport. I'll put a slimline computer with a
    TV out video card near the TV and connect with RCA or SVideo cables,
    set TV to one of the AV inputs, make movie selection.

    Should work.

    Next project, figure out how to feed videos into my cable
    wires without leaking out to my neighbors or the cable company.



    technomaNge

  11. Re: linux video server

    On Wed, 22 Oct 2008 21:36:07 -0500, Joe wrote:

    > On 2008-10-21, MarkA wrote:
    >>
    >> This is something I have thought about, too.
    >>
    >> The first thing you need is to have your TV connected to a small computer,
    >> that can communicate with other computers over the home LAN. This small
    >> computer could run MythTV (or Mythbuntu) to provide a menu, communicate
    >> with the computer that actually stores the avi files, etc. Of course, as
    >> with any VCR, you need a way to switch between the live feed and the PVR
    >> feed.
    >>
    >> Right now, I just burn whatever movie I want to watch to a DVD and stick
    >> it in the DVD player to watch. Not exactly elegant, but it's simple and
    >> it works. If I had a DVD player that played the avi files directly, that
    >> would be even better.
    >>
    >> The main stumbling block, for me, is finding a computer case/mobo with a
    >> small enough form factor to sit unobtrusively near my TV, along with all
    >> the other video boxes.
    >>

    >
    > http://www.mwave.com/mwave/Skusearch...iteria=BA24741
    >
    > This is quite a bargain. You'll need CPU/Mem/HDD/Optical drive.
    > You'll also want a TV Tuner card if you are planning to use it as a
    > PVR as well...


    That looks like a sweet little system, Joe. Thanks for the link. I just
    ordered my Neuros OSD from Newegg for $155 - it is a complete package, and
    user-hackable by design. I'll post a review in this thread once I get it
    up and running.

    http://www.neurostechnology.com

    --
    MarkA
    Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
    About eight o'clock


  12. Re: linux video server

    On 2008-10-23, MarkA wrote:
    > On Wed, 22 Oct 2008 21:36:07 -0500, Joe wrote:
    >
    >> On 2008-10-21, MarkA wrote:
    >>>
    >>> This is something I have thought about, too.
    >>>
    >>> The first thing you need is to have your TV connected to a small computer,
    >>> that can communicate with other computers over the home LAN. This small
    >>> computer could run MythTV (or Mythbuntu) to provide a menu, communicate
    >>> with the computer that actually stores the avi files, etc. Of course, as
    >>> with any VCR, you need a way to switch between the live feed and the PVR
    >>> feed.
    >>>
    >>> Right now, I just burn whatever movie I want to watch to a DVD and stick
    >>> it in the DVD player to watch. Not exactly elegant, but it's simple and
    >>> it works. If I had a DVD player that played the avi files directly, that
    >>> would be even better.
    >>>
    >>> The main stumbling block, for me, is finding a computer case/mobo with a
    >>> small enough form factor to sit unobtrusively near my TV, along with all
    >>> the other video boxes.
    >>>

    >>
    >> http://www.mwave.com/mwave/Skusearch...iteria=BA24741
    >>
    >> This is quite a bargain. You'll need CPU/Mem/HDD/Optical drive.
    >> You'll also want a TV Tuner card if you are planning to use it as a
    >> PVR as well...

    >
    > That looks like a sweet little system, Joe. Thanks for the link. I just
    > ordered my Neuros OSD from Newegg for $155 - it is a complete package, and
    > user-hackable by design. I'll post a review in this thread once I get it
    > up and running.
    >
    > http://www.neurostechnology.com
    >


    They look interesting, but I am more in the camp of wanting a PC
    there. Not necessarily because it is needed, but because it is
    cool... ;-)

    Besides, I already have an RF Wireless Keyboard and a USB Hauppauge HD
    TV Capture box (though this one is new and probably not yet supported
    in Linux). By the time I build it, the Hauppauge will probably be
    considered old... ;-)


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

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