OK, I give up. - Ubuntu

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Thread: OK, I give up.

  1. OK, I give up.

    OK, I give up.
    What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?
    I think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    Thanks for the RAM responses.
    Thanks

  2. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete wrote:
    > OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)? I
    > think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    > Thanks for the RAM responses. Thanks


    You can't get much easier than Ubuntu when it comes to adding software.
    Understand that in Linux, you don't go to some website, download the
    software, and "install" it by double clicking. That's the "Windows way".
    In Linux, you use the package manager, which is a built-in program that
    you use to access the distribution's repositories of available programs,
    and install from within that program. It's really, really slick, but a
    completely different process from what Windows uses.

    That being said, I recommend MEPIS and PCLinuxOS. Both are user
    friendly, stable, and easy to configure (and easy to add software to).

    The current versions are MEPIS 7 and PCLinuxOS 2007. Never versions are
    in development as we speak, but will probably not be ready for full
    release for some time yet.

    --
    Mark Warner
    SimplyMEPIS Linux v6.5
    Registered Linux User #415318
    ....lose .inhibitions when replying

  3. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete wrote:

    > OK, I give up.
    > What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?
    > I think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    > Thanks for the RAM responses.
    > Thanks


    Linux Mint gets a lot of very good reviews, e.g.

    http://www.distro-review.com/review-linux-mint-5-elyssa

    It's based on Ubuntu, and includes all the extra bits you need to get your
    system working from scratch, as well as being designed for ease of use.

    --
    Facts are sacred ... but comment is free

  4. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete schreef:
    > OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)? I
    > think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    > Thanks for the RAM responses. Thanks


    Why give up and on what?

    Ubuntu uses the apt system of Debian Linux for it's software
    repositories, there is an application called synaptic that will let you
    add (and remove) software the easiest way imaginable.
    As long as you stick to the official repositories there is, contrary to
    Windows, hardly a chance you'd pull in something nasty.

    At the same time this system will either notify you of a new version for
    an installed application or when set up that way upgrade it for you.

    There are a few offshoot distributions like Mint Linux that piggybacks
    on the Ubuntu system but will give you more software than would, due to
    it's funny software patents, be legally possible in the USofA.
    Basically that's many things related to Multimedia.

    Personally I prefer Kubuntu for it has greater flexibility when you want
    or need to tweak things on the desktop plus I prefer the KDE desktop's
    integration. Ubuntu 'pure' runs the Gnome desktop. One issue, the KDE
    desktop is right now in the process of a serious workover...

    Xubuntu is the Light Weight version of Ubuntu, it works well on
    computers with less processor power and memory, that's achieved by using
    the Xfce desktop.

    All run on the same Ubuntu platform, it's 'just' the desktop experience
    that's different.
    I find the biggest thing Ubuntu has brought to the Linux world is better
    hardware support.

    Here's more:
    "http://www.debianadmin.com/list-of-ubuntu-based-linux-distributions-and-live-cds.html"

    Here is the most complete list of distributions:
    http://www.linux.org/

  5. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete wrote:

    > OK, I give up.
    > What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?
    > I think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    > Thanks for the RAM responses.
    > Thanks



    Hi Pete,

    I personally like Debian versions of Linux.
    Debian
    Sidux
    Mint
    Mepis

    --
    Debian Linux by birth, Sidux by choice!

  6. Re: OK, I give up.

    I have tried a lot of distros and the best is Ubuntu. And not for just
    beginners, I am not a beginner at all. I have been using linux since
    1995 and switched everything to Ubuntu due to its quality.

    i

  7. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete wrote:
    > OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)? I
    > think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    > Thanks for the RAM responses. Thanks



    Sidux....

    --
    Regards
    Ted Wager
    High Peak UK
    Using Sidux Linux

  8. Re: OK, I give up.

    "Pete" <> skrev i meddelelsen
    news:GjIKk.3927$ZP4.851@nlpi067.nbdc.sbc.com...
    > OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)? I
    > think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.

    Why turn away from Ubuntu? It is that distro I have seen where it is easyst
    to get help. Just join the Ubuntu forum ore nearly type your quiston in
    Google
    and see what turns up.
    This site has helped me a lot when I started using Ubuntu. Somthing like
    5.10
    http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Hardy

    regards
    Henning


  9. Re: OK, I give up.

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 12:54:19 -0500, Ignoramus7289 wrote:

    > I have tried a lot of distros and the best is Ubuntu. And not for just
    > beginners, I am not a beginner at all. I have been using linux since
    > 1995 and switched everything to Ubuntu due to its quality.
    >
    > i


    At this point I would say Ubuntu or Mint Linux.
    I feel Mint is a little more polished and it did a better job with my
    hardware than Ubuntu Hardy did.

  10. Re: OK, I give up.

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:25:43 -0400, Pete wrote:

    > OK, I give up.


    Ok.

    --
    // This is my opinion.

  11. Re: OK, I give up.

    On 2008-10-19, Dan C wrote:
    > On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:25:43 -0400, Pete wrote:


    >> What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?

    >
    > Slackware.


    And of course Dan is totally correct. A full install of slackware,
    perhaps using KDE, would be an excellent starting point. The legend of
    slackware being difficult to install and use is for the most part only a
    legend. It is simple and clear, close to the intentions of the original
    software authors, and it encourages an enquiring mind.

    Andrew

    --
    echo 'hfrarg.naqerj@tznvy.pbz' | \
    tr 'A-M N-Z a-m n-z' 'N-Z A-M n-z a-m'

  12. Re: OK, I give up.

    On 20 Oct 2008 05:38:01 GMT, andrew wrote:

    > And of course Dan is totally correct. A full install of slackware,
    > perhaps using KDE, would be an excellent starting point. The
    > legend of slackware being difficult to install and use is for the
    > most part only a legend. It is simple and clear, close to the
    > intentions of the original software authors, and it encourages an
    > enquiring mind.


    But who has one of those? Most people just want to load their
    applications and do some useful work. Crunchbang (#!) seems to be
    one of the best for those who just want to load multi-media and
    browsers etc.

    --
    Chris Game

    Logic: The art of being wrong with confidence...

  13. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete wrote:
    > OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?
    > I think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software
    > to. Thanks for the RAM responses. Thanks



    You can't beat Ubuntu for a beginner, and it is the easiest for
    installing software as well (sharing this easy installation job with any
    DEB-APT based distro).

    You might elaborate for what you want to use a distro:

    Desktop/tower, laptop/notebook, CAT-5 or WiFi, strictly CLI or GUI,
    surfing, e-mail, news, office, graphics, multimedia, or for a server?

    Which CPU and speed and how much RAM, etc.

    Without specifying your needs and wants, you are apt to get an answer
    like you would expect from a group if you ask what food tastes best. ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  14. Re: OK, I give up.

    Chris Game wrote:
    > On 20 Oct 2008 05:38:01 GMT, andrew wrote:
    >
    >
    >> And of course Dan is totally correct. A full install of slackware,
    >> perhaps using KDE, would be an excellent starting point. The
    >> legend of slackware being difficult to install and use is for the
    >> most part only a legend. It is simple and clear, close to the
    >> intentions of the original software authors, and it encourages an
    >> enquiring mind.
    >>

    >
    > But who has one of those? Most people just want to load their
    > applications and do some useful work. Crunchbang (#!) seems to be
    > one of the best for those who just want to load multi-media and
    > browsers etc.



    I guess that Dan, Andrew and I are not "most people" Chris. I can't
    speak for them, but if I can install Slackware (and that was about four
    years ago) then even you can do it.

    You have that inquiring mind, since you asked a question. However I
    think you don't use it to its fullest.

    Your description of "most people" fits the windroids exactly.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  15. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete schrieb:
    > OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)? I
    > think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    > Thanks for the RAM responses. Thanks


    If you LOVE the "download --> double click --> install" way:

    http://www.pcbsd.org


    After installing PC-BSD goto

    http://www.pbidir.com

    and download the *.pbi files you need.
    Then double click ... ;-)


    HTH


    Matthias
    --
    "There are 10 kinds of people:
    those who understand Binary and those who don't."

    [EOF]

  16. Re: OK, I give up.


    "John F. Morse" wrote in message
    news:gdhon9$tp0$1@optima7.xanadu-bbs.net...
    > Pete wrote:
    >> OK, I give up. What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)? I
    >> think it all comes down to which version is easiest to add software to.
    >> Thanks for the RAM responses. Thanks

    >
    >
    > You can't beat Ubuntu for a beginner, and it is the easiest for installing
    > software as well (sharing this easy installation job with any DEB-APT
    > based distro).
    >
    > You might elaborate for what you want to use a distro:
    >
    > Desktop/tower, laptop/notebook, CAT-5 or WiFi, strictly CLI or GUI,
    > surfing, e-mail, news, office, graphics, multimedia, or for a server?
    >
    > Which CPU and speed and how much RAM, etc.
    >
    > Without specifying your needs and wants, you are apt to get an answer like
    > you would expect from a group if you ask what food tastes best. ;-)
    >
    >
    > --
    > John
    > No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products
    > were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.
    >
    > The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell
    > me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being,
    > who wants me to know what I can do.


    My machine is P4 HT 3.0, 512meg, 40 gig HD, which should handle most
    versions of Linux I think.
    I simply want email, web, open office, graphics, etc.


  17. Re: OK, I give up.

    andrew wrote:
    > Dan C wrote:
    >> Pete wrote:

    >
    >>> What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?

    >>
    >> Slackware.

    >
    > And of course Dan is totally correct. A full install of slackware,
    > perhaps using KDE, would be an excellent starting point. The
    > legend of slackware being difficult to install and use is for the
    > most part only a legend. It is simple and clear, close to the
    > intentions of the original software authors, and it encourages an
    > enquiring mind.


    Amazing. This is two posts by Dan C in the past two weeks that
    appear (at least when quoted) to be reasonable.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.

  18. Re: OK, I give up.

    "Pete" wrote in
    news:4M3Lk.5938$YU2.3901@nlpi066.nbdc.sbc.com:

    > My machine is P4 HT 3.0, 512meg, 40 gig HD, which should handle most
    > versions of Linux I think.
    > I simply want email, web, open office, graphics, etc.


    Of which all the listed are installed with Ubuntu


  19. Re: OK, I give up.

    Pete schreef:
    >


    >
    > My machine is P4 HT 3.0, 512meg, 40 gig HD, which should handle most
    > versions of Linux I think.
    > I simply want email, web, open office, graphics, etc.
    >

    It'll run quite nicely!

  20. Re: OK, I give up.

    In alt.os.linux.ubuntu on 20 Oct 2008 05:38:01 GMT, andrew
    wrote:

    > On 2008-10-19, Dan C wrote:
    >> On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:25:43 -0400, Pete wrote:

    >
    >>> What is the best Linux for a beginner (besides Ubuntu)?


    Currently, 2.6.27.2. Beginners shouldn't mess with development
    versions.

    (Sorry, I just couldn't resist that.)

    Perhaps try Linspire and aim to progress beyond it ASAP.

    >> Slackware.

    >
    > And of course Dan is totally correct. A full install of slackware,
    > perhaps using KDE, would be an excellent starting point. The legend of
    > slackware being difficult to install and use is for the most part only a
    > legend. It is simple and clear, close to the intentions of the original
    > software authors, and it encourages an enquiring mind.


    The problem is that many beginners neither have nor wish to acquire
    an enquiring mind. They just want something that works much the same
    way as Windows.

    In my opinion, the best distro for a beginner is anything that
    recognises enough hardware to make Internet search engines useable.

    In my experience, this was Mandrake 8.x. My WinModem worked, so I was
    able to look stuff up.

    Being able to look stuff up is good, whether one is a beginner or not.


    --
    PJR :-)
    slrn newsreader v0.9.9p1: http://slrn.sourceforge.net/
    extra slrn documentation: http://slrn-doc.sourceforge.net/
    newsgroup name validator: http://pjr.lasnobberia.net/usenet/validator

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