Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server - Ubuntu ; Recently, I started my exploration into Ubuntu. I turned a Windows machine into a multi-boot system by adding/installing Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron. There is an HP Laserjet 5 attached locally (to the parallel port). After adding the HP printer in ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 50

Thread: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

  1. Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    Recently, I started my exploration into Ubuntu.
    I turned a Windows machine into a multi-boot system by
    adding/installing Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron.
    There is an HP Laserjet 5 attached locally (to the parallel port).
    After adding the HP printer in Ubuntu, local printing works.
    I would now like to take advantage of Ubuntu's network printing support
    by enabling Ubuntu print server capabilities so that I can print from
    another Windows machine on the network. Googling leads me to the
    following informative URLs ...

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Ne...tingWithUbuntu
    http://www.funnestra.org/ubuntu/hardy/

    However, I can't add the shared printer to the Windows client.
    When browsing for the network printer, I can see the Ubuntu host (or
    print server?) name. But, double-clicking on it gives the following
    message in the "Browse for Printer" dialog ...

    "\\desktop is not accessible.
    The computer or sharename could not be found. Make sure you typed it
    correctly, and try again."

    Where is the printer name set? Network settings show 127.0.1.1 as the
    host IP address. Should it be something like 192.168.xxx.xxx?

    Also, how can I verify that CUPS and IPP is properly setup?

  2. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 16:23:11 -0700
    Adam wrote:
    >
    > However, I can't add the shared printer to the Windows client.
    > When browsing for the network printer, I can see the Ubuntu host (or
    > print server?) name. But, double-clicking on it gives the following
    > message in the "Browse for Printer" dialog ...
    >
    > "\\desktop is not accessible.
    > The computer or sharename could not be found. Make sure you typed it
    > correctly, and try again."


    If you want to print directly to CUPS, you'll want to select
    http://YOUR.IP.ADDY.HERE:631/printers/PRINTER_NAME as the printer on
    the network to print to.

    You can use the MS Publisher Imagesetter driver, which comes with
    recent versions of Microsoft WIndows.

    See [1] for directions on how to set Windows up for this configuration.

    > Also, how can I verify that CUPS and IPP is properly setup?


    Go to System→Administration→Printing, and ensure that printer sharing
    is turned on. I don't have a Hardy system in front of me at the moment
    to look at it to see where that option is exactly, but it should be
    somewhere under server settings for the print software.

    --- Mike

    [1] http://www.owlfish.com/thoughts/wini...003-07-20.html

    --
    My sigfile ran away and is on hiatus.


  3. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    Try adding a entry to your hosts file...

    server ip server name
    192.168.1.x desktop



    "Adam" wrote in message
    news:gd39l1$ge4$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    > Recently, I started my exploration into Ubuntu.
    > I turned a Windows machine into a multi-boot system by
    > adding/installing Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron.
    > There is an HP Laserjet 5 attached locally (to the parallel port).
    > After adding the HP printer in Ubuntu, local printing works.
    > I would now like to take advantage of Ubuntu's network printing support by
    > enabling Ubuntu print server capabilities so that I can print from another
    > Windows machine on the network. Googling leads me to the following
    > informative URLs ...
    >
    > https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Ne...tingWithUbuntu
    > http://www.funnestra.org/ubuntu/hardy/
    >
    > However, I can't add the shared printer to the Windows client.
    > When browsing for the network printer, I can see the Ubuntu host (or print
    > server?) name. But, double-clicking on it gives the following message in
    > the "Browse for Printer" dialog ...
    >
    > "\\desktop is not accessible.
    > The computer or sharename could not be found. Make sure you typed it
    > correctly, and try again."
    >
    > Where is the printer name set? Network settings show 127.0.1.1 as the
    > host IP address. Should it be something like 192.168.xxx.xxx?
    >
    > Also, how can I verify that CUPS and IPP is properly setup?



  4. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    Michael B. Trausch wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 16:23:11 -0700
    > Adam wrote:
    >> However, I can't add the shared printer to the Windows client.
    >> When browsing for the network printer, I can see the Ubuntu host (or
    >> print server?) name. But, double-clicking on it gives the following
    >> message in the "Browse for Printer" dialog ...
    >>
    >> "\\desktop is not accessible.
    >> The computer or sharename could not be found. Make sure you typed it
    >> correctly, and try again."

    >
    > If you want to print directly to CUPS, you'll want to select
    > http://YOUR.IP.ADDY.HERE:631/printers/PRINTER_NAME as the printer on
    > the network to print to.
    >


    Yes, I was hoping to double-click my way out of having to locate those
    two bits of information ( and ).
    But, the generated message from the "Browse for Printer" dialog signals
    that Ubuntu is not properly setup on the network yet.

    Also, local printing from Firefox shows ...

    = CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5

    So, apparently, the CUPS print server part looks okay.
    If only I can figure out how to get it on the network.


    > You can use the MS Publisher Imagesetter driver, which comes with
    > recent versions of Microsoft WIndows.
    >
    > See [1] for directions on how to set Windows up for this configuration.
    >
    >> Also, how can I verify that CUPS and IPP is properly setup?

    >
    > Go to System→Administration→Printing, and ensure that printer sharing
    > is turned on. I don't have a Hardy system in front of me at the moment
    > to look at it to see where that option is exactly, but it should be
    > somewhere under server settings for the print software.
    >
    > --- Mike
    >
    > [1] http://www.owlfish.com/thoughts/wini...003-07-20.html
    >



    Yes, I have "Share published printers connected to this system" checked
    under "Server Settings" according to the following URL ...

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Ne...tingWithUbuntu


    And, I have verified that CUPS (cupsys) is installed.

    https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/serverguide/C/cups.html


    Too bad the following URL ...

    https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/printing/C/printing.html

    does not expand the "Network Printing" section to
    cover how to setup an Ubuntu print server.


    Regarding "Network Settings", what's "Enable roaming mode" under
    "eth0 Properties"? I currently have ...

    1) "Enable roaming mode" unchecked with
    2) "Configuration" set to "Automatic configuration (DHCP)"


    I should add that Ubuntu is being added to a home network with
    a BEFSR41 Linksys router, which has DHCP server enabled.

    And, here's the output of "ifconfig -a" ...

    eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:04:75:7a:d2:e9
    inet addr:192.168.1.101 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
    inet6 addr: fe80::204:75ff:fe7a:d2e9/64 Scope:Link
    UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    RX packets:16640 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:3 frame:0
    TX packets:12563 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    RX bytes:16469681 (15.7 MB) TX bytes:2233367 (2.1 MB)
    Interrupt:10 Base address:0x2000

    lo Link encap:Local Loopback
    inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
    inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
    UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
    RX packets:152 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    TX packets:152 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
    RX bytes:24975 (24.3 KB) TX bytes:24975 (24.3 KB)


    This Loopback stuff looks suspicious to me. What is it?
    Could this be preventing the Ubuntu box from getting on the network?

  5. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 22:34:10 -0700
    Adam wrote:

    > Michael B. Trausch wrote:
    > > On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 16:23:11 -0700
    > > Adam wrote:
    > >> However, I can't add the shared printer to the Windows client.
    > >> When browsing for the network printer, I can see the Ubuntu host
    > >> (or print server?) name. But, double-clicking on it gives the
    > >> following message in the "Browse for Printer" dialog ...
    > >>
    > >> "\\desktop is not accessible.
    > >> The computer or sharename could not be found. Make sure you typed
    > >> it correctly, and try again."

    > >
    > > If you want to print directly to CUPS, you'll want to select
    > > http://YOUR.IP.ADDY.HERE:631/printers/PRINTER_NAME as the printer on
    > > the network to print to.
    > >

    >
    > Yes, I was hoping to double-click my way out of having to locate
    > those two bits of information ( and
    > ). But, the generated message from the "Browse for
    > Printer" dialog signals that Ubuntu is not properly setup on the
    > network yet.
    >
    > Also, local printing from Firefox shows ...
    >
    > = CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5
    >
    > So, apparently, the CUPS print server part looks okay.
    > If only I can figure out how to get it on the network.
    >


    It's _already_ on the network as an IPP (Internet Printing Protocol)
    printer.

    It sounds like you want it to be on the Windows Network (that is, you
    want it exported via SMB networking, which is the native file/printer
    sharing that runs on Windows networks, within an workgroup, which is an
    ad-hoc collection of machines). If that's the case, you should be able
    to install the Samba server and it will pick up your printers from
    CUPS. You'll still need to select a driver on the Windows box, but
    then you'll be printing via SMB, not IPP. (IPP is just an adaptation
    of the HTTP protocol that runs on port 631, with it's own
    application-specific extensions).

    [snip]
    >
    > Regarding "Network Settings", what's "Enable roaming mode" under
    > "eth0 Properties"? I currently have ...
    >
    > 1) "Enable roaming mode" unchecked with
    > 2) "Configuration" set to "Automatic configuration (DHCP)"
    >


    I am not 100% certain on what Roaming Mode is, but it has something to
    do with NetworkManager being able to do things with the connection, I
    think. I know that if you configure the Ethernet device by hand using
    manual static settings, that you're no longer in it. With it on, I
    think that it uses DHCP and Avahi to ensure you get an IP address when
    you're connected to the network with a wire.

    [snip]
    >
    > And, here's the output of "ifconfig -a" ...
    >
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:04:75:7a:d2:e9
    > inet addr:192.168.1.101 Bcast:192.168.1.255
    > Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::204:75ff:fe7a:d2e9/64 Scope:Link
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:16640 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:3 frame:0
    > TX packets:12563 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:16469681 (15.7 MB) TX bytes:2233367 (2.1 MB)
    > Interrupt:10 Base address:0x2000
    >
    > lo Link encap:Local Loopback
    > inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
    > inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
    > UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
    > RX packets:152 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:152 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
    > RX bytes:24975 (24.3 KB) TX bytes:24975 (24.3 KB)
    >
    >
    > This Loopback stuff looks suspicious to me. What is it?
    > Could this be preventing the Ubuntu box from getting on the network?
    >


    Absolutely not---you *must* have lo there. Loopback provides the
    127.0.0.0/8 network which is associated with the virtual "lo" device on
    Linux systems. Every system that has a functional TCP/IP stack has
    a virtual interface for loopback networking. Some applications
    actually use that, as well. Any communications sent to 127.0.0.0/8
    come back ("loopback") to another socket on the same address, more or
    less. See Wikipedia[1] for a little better explanation.

    From the output on eth0, you're already on the 192.168.1.0/24 network,
    with an IP address of 192.168.1.101. I presume that the router is
    192.168.1.1, given the particular netblock you're using.

    This means that if you are to print using IPP, that you'll use:

    http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/PRINTER_NAME

    to connect. (The http:// part might even be ipp://, I don't remember
    which one Windows requires, it has really been a very long time since I
    have had my hands on a Windows system for more than 30 seconds or so,
    since I don't use it. :-))

    In any event, you need the loopback interface, chances are it's in
    use. It's enabled by default and has been since as far back as I can
    remember on every operating system that has TCP/IP networking. :-)

    --- Mike

    --
    My sigfile ran away and is on hiatus.


  6. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    Adam wrote:
    > Michael B. Trausch wrote:
    >> On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 22:34:10 -0700
    >> Adam wrote:
    >>
    >>> Michael B. Trausch wrote:
    >>>> On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 16:23:11 -0700
    >>>> Adam wrote:
    >>>>> However, I can't add the shared printer to the Windows client.
    >>>>> When browsing for the network printer, I can see the Ubuntu host
    >>>>> (or print server?) name. But, double-clicking on it gives the
    >>>>> following message in the "Browse for Printer" dialog ...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "\\desktop is not accessible.
    >>>>> The computer or sharename could not be found. Make sure you typed
    >>>>> it correctly, and try again."
    >>>> If you want to print directly to CUPS, you'll want to select
    >>>> http://YOUR.IP.ADDY.HERE:631/printers/PRINTER_NAME as the printer on
    >>>> the network to print to.
    >>>>
    >>> Yes, I was hoping to double-click my way out of having to locate
    >>> those two bits of information ( and
    >>> ). But, the generated message from the "Browse for
    >>> Printer" dialog signals that Ubuntu is not properly setup on the
    >>> network yet.
    >>>
    >>> Also, local printing from Firefox shows ...
    >>>
    >>> = CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5
    >>>
    >>> So, apparently, the CUPS print server part looks okay.
    >>> If only I can figure out how to get it on the network.
    >>>

    >>
    >> It's _already_ on the network as an IPP (Internet Printing Protocol)
    >> printer.
    >>
    >> It sounds like you want it to be on the Windows Network (that is, you
    >> want it exported via SMB networking, which is the native file/printer
    >> sharing that runs on Windows networks, within an workgroup, which is an
    >> ad-hoc collection of machines). If that's the case, you should be able
    >> to install the Samba server and it will pick up your printers from
    >> CUPS. You'll still need to select a driver on the Windows box, but
    >> then you'll be printing via SMB, not IPP. (IPP is just an adaptation
    >> of the HTTP protocol that runs on port 631, with it's own
    >> application-specific extensions).
    >>
    >> [snip]
    >>> Regarding "Network Settings", what's "Enable roaming mode" under
    >>> "eth0 Properties"? I currently have ...
    >>>
    >>> 1) "Enable roaming mode" unchecked with
    >>> 2) "Configuration" set to "Automatic configuration (DHCP)"
    >>>

    >>
    >> I am not 100% certain on what Roaming Mode is, but it has something to
    >> do with NetworkManager being able to do things with the connection, I
    >> think. I know that if you configure the Ethernet device by hand using
    >> manual static settings, that you're no longer in it. With it on, I
    >> think that it uses DHCP and Avahi to ensure you get an IP address when
    >> you're connected to the network with a wire.
    >>
    >> [snip]
    >>> And, here's the output of "ifconfig -a" ...
    >>>
    >>> eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:04:75:7a:d2:e9
    >>> inet addr:192.168.1.101 Bcast:192.168.1.255
    >>> Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::204:75ff:fe7a:d2e9/64 Scope:Link
    >>> UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    >>> RX packets:16640 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:3 frame:0
    >>> TX packets:12563 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    >>> collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    >>> RX bytes:16469681 (15.7 MB) TX bytes:2233367 (2.1 MB)
    >>> Interrupt:10 Base address:0x2000
    >>>
    >>> lo Link encap:Local Loopback
    >>> inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
    >>> inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
    >>> UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
    >>> RX packets:152 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    >>> TX packets:152 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    >>> collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
    >>> RX bytes:24975 (24.3 KB) TX bytes:24975 (24.3 KB)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> This Loopback stuff looks suspicious to me. What is it?
    >>> Could this be preventing the Ubuntu box from getting on the network?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Absolutely not---you *must* have lo there. Loopback provides the
    >> 127.0.0.0/8 network which is associated with the virtual "lo" device on
    >> Linux systems. Every system that has a functional TCP/IP stack has
    >> a virtual interface for loopback networking. Some applications
    >> actually use that, as well. Any communications sent to 127.0.0.0/8
    >> come back ("loopback") to another socket on the same address, more or
    >> less. See Wikipedia[1] for a little better explanation.
    >>
    >> From the output on eth0, you're already on the 192.168.1.0/24 network,
    >> with an IP address of 192.168.1.101. I presume that the router is
    >> 192.168.1.1, given the particular netblock you're using.
    >>
    >> This means that if you are to print using IPP, that you'll use:
    >>
    >> http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/PRINTER_NAME
    >>
    >> to connect. (The http:// part might even be ipp://, I don't remember
    >> which one Windows requires, it has really been a very long time since I
    >> have had my hands on a Windows system for more than 30 seconds or so,
    >> since I don't use it. :-))
    >>
    >> In any event, you need the loopback interface, chances are it's in
    >> use. It's enabled by default and has been since as far back as I can
    >> remember on every operating system that has TCP/IP networking. :-)
    >>
    >> --- Mike
    >>

    >
    >
    > I tried entering the following ...
    >
    > 1) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5"
    > 2) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/HP_LaserJet_5"
    >
    > but no luck. Something is missing. Otherwise, I should have been able
    > to double-click through the add network printer process.
    >
    > I thought CUPS is needed for print server and samba is needed for file
    > server. Didn't know samba is needed for Ubuntu print server as well.



    Also, Places->Network File Browser shows "Windows Network" but
    double-clicking comes up empty.

  7. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 23:33:31 -0700
    Adam wrote:

    > I tried entering the following ...
    >
    > 1) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5"
    > 2) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/HP_LaserJet_5"
    >
    > but no luck. Something is missing. Otherwise, I should have been
    > able to double-click through the add network printer process.
    >


    You have to be on the screen that takes a URL (not a UNC name) in
    Windows. For the CUPS print server which is _already_ there and
    working, directions can be found on the Internet.[1] Once the printer
    is shared, and your IP address of the print server is known, you go to
    add the printer and enter the printer's URL in the Internet option.
    You'll see something that says "Connect to a printer on the
    Internet..." and go through those screens.

    The printer driver selection screen should come up, and you can select
    a Generic/MS Publisher Imagesetter.

    Then you can print a test page. I have used the instructions I pointed
    you to before on Windows XP (though a long time ago), but I do know
    that they work. There are more sets of directions online, as well, in
    case maybe another viewpoint would be helpful.[2] Searching Google for
    "Windows XP IPP CUPS" will find lots more.

    There is also some help from Microsoft's direction which shows how to
    add a IPP printer by way of command line in Windows.[3] A template for
    the command is:

    rundll32 printui.dll,PrintUIEntry /b "Printer Name" /x /n "blah" /if /f
    %windir%\inf\ntprint.inf /r
    "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/sharename" /m "MS
    Publisher Imagesetter"

    The command explained:

    rundll32 printui.dll,PrintUIEntry

    This tells Windows that you want to call the function "PrintUIEntry" in
    printui.dll.

    /b "Printer Name"

    This tells Windows the name you want to give to the printer in the
    Windows control panel.

    /x /n "blah"

    /x -- "Web point and print" -- configures an Internet printer, from
    what I can gather on the MS documentation site.[3] /x requires, but
    the /n "blah" part is ignored by the command.

    /if /f %windir%\inf\ntprint.inf - Not sure, but it is required verbatim.

    /r "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/sharename" - Replace sharename
    with the name of your printer. The printer on my Ubuntu box is named
    "e250dn" so for sharename, on my girlfriend's system I put e250dn in
    that spot.

    /m "MS Publisher Imagesetter" --- put this in verbatim. It tells
    Windows what driver to use. MS Publisher Imagesetter tells Windows to
    print using PostScript, which CUPS takes as input.

    I got my girlfriend to reboot into Windows so that I could try the
    command and it worked, and she printed a test page and a few other
    things that way, so this is one way of doing it on Windows without
    having to fuss with the user interface (and *without* having to
    install Samba on the Ubuntu box). :-)

    From what you said above was your printer name, try to copy and paste
    this command first on your Windows box, though you may need to tweak it
    a bit if it doesn't work the first time:

    rundll32 printui.dll,PrintUIEntry /b "HP LJ 5 on Ubuntu" /x /n
    "blah" /if /f %windir%\inf\ntprint.inf /r
    "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/HP_LaserJet_5" /m "MS
    Publisher Imagesetter"

    If the command is correct but the printer name is incorrect, Windows
    will ding at you and pop up a message box saying "The arguments are
    invalid" after installing the printer driver internally, and won't
    create the printer icon in the control panel. If the printer driver is
    incorrectly typed, it will complain that it can't find the driver, of
    course.

    > I thought CUPS is needed for print server and samba is needed for
    > file server. Didn't know samba is needed for Ubuntu print server as
    > well.


    It's not; it's only needed if you want to print using the Windows
    printer sharing protocol. CUPS uses IPP, which is a standard protocol
    and Windows can also communicate with it.

    Samba implements SMB networking, which is a file *and* printer sharing
    protocol for Microsoft systems. If you install it and use that, then
    you'll effectively have *two* print servers running on your system.
    Does that make it any clearer?

    HTH,
    Mike

    [1] http://www.owlfish.com/thoughts/wini...003-07-20.html
    [2] http://www.swerdna.net.au/linhowtoprintipp.html (at bottom)
    [3] http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314486

    --
    My sigfile ran away and is on hiatus.


  8. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 23:41:21 -0700, Adam wrote:


    >> I thought CUPS is needed for print server and samba is needed for file
    >> server. Didn't know samba is needed for Ubuntu print server as well.


    In that case you've learned something. Samba is needed to share files and
    printers over a Windows Workgroup.
    >
    >
    > Also, Places->Network File Browser shows "Windows Network" but
    > double-clicking comes up empty.


    For /****'s/ sake learn to snip!

  9. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 23:33:31 -0700, Adam wrote:

    > I tried entering the following ...
    >
    > 1) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5" 2)
    > "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/HP_LaserJet_5"


    By the way: I bet your print server got its address (192.168.1.101) from
    your router's DHCP service. That means it may not have that address
    forever, especially as you add stuff to your network. Rule of thumb: if a
    box is to provide ANY service to other boxes, that box should have a
    fixed IP address, so the other boxes can find it. You probably won't have
    any problem with the current setup for awhile. Fair warning!

  10. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 10:33:20 -0500
    Roland Latour wrote:

    > By the way: I bet your print server got its address (192.168.1.101)
    > from your router's DHCP service. That means it may not have that
    > address forever, especially as you add stuff to your network. Rule of
    > thumb: if a box is to provide ANY service to other boxes, that box
    > should have a fixed IP address, so the other boxes can find it. You
    > probably won't have any problem with the current setup for awhile.
    > Fair warning!


    I've never had an issue with my IP addresses changing unless the box
    goes offline for a long period of time. Usually it will request the
    address that it previously held, and the DHCP server will give it
    back. At least, that's how it is on my network. Same thing to my
    upstream ISP (Comcast) -- I only lose the address if my network is down
    for a long time, say, a day-long power outage.

    --- Mike

    --
    My sigfile ran away and is on hiatus.


  11. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server


    "Roland Latour" wrote in message
    news:yOCdnel6zcPdkGvVnZ2dnUVZ_tfinZ2d@posted.caven etllc...
    > On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 23:33:31 -0700, Adam wrote:
    >
    > > I tried entering the following ...
    > >
    > > 1) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/CUPS/HP_LaserJet_5"
    > > 2) "http://192.168.1.101:631/printers/HP_LaserJet_5"

    >
    > By the way: I bet your print server got its address (192.168.1.101) from
    > your router's DHCP service. That means it may not have that address
    > forever, especially as you add stuff to your network. Rule of thumb: if a
    > box is to provide ANY service to other boxes, that box should have a
    > fixed IP address, so the other boxes can find it. You probably won't have
    > any problem with the current setup for awhile. Fair warning!



    Thanks for the heads up.

    Yes, you're right about the router's DHCP service.
    I only have two systems (desktop/server & laptop) on
    the network so I haven't had any IP address problems yet.
    I just have to be sure the desktop/server is powered on first.
    I like using DHCP, especially for the laptop, since
    I can plug it into most any company's network.
    Is there a better way?



  12. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server

    On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 09:59:28 -0700
    "Adam" wrote:

    > Thanks for the heads up.
    >
    > Yes, you're right about the router's DHCP service.
    > I only have two systems (desktop/server & laptop) on
    > the network so I haven't had any IP address problems yet.
    > I just have to be sure the desktop/server is powered on first.
    > I like using DHCP, especially for the laptop, since
    > I can plug it into most any company's network.
    > Is there a better way?


    You can always just configure the desktop to use a static IP address.
    Though, it might be easier if you tell your router to give the desktop
    a static DHCP-assigned address. That would work, too... tell it to,
    for example, always give MAC address XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX the IP
    192.168.1.5 (for example). This assumes that your router supports that
    functionality.

    --- Mike

    --
    My sigfile ran away and is on hiatus.


  13. Linux/Ubuntu: throws clock out of sync for Windows

    On my Ubuntu/Windows multi-boot system,
    the clock gets thrown way out of sync when
    booting into Windows after Ubuntu. What gives?
    I have to adjust the clock every time I boot into
    Windows after Ubuntu. What do I need to do to fix this?



  14. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: throws clock out of sync for Windows


    "Adam" wrote in message news:gd58f6$3j1$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    > On my Ubuntu/Windows multi-boot system,
    > the clock gets thrown way out of sync when
    > booting into Windows after Ubuntu. What gives?
    > I have to adjust the clock every time I boot into
    > Windows after Ubuntu. What do I need to do to fix this?
    >


    Oops! What's this doing here.
    It should be a new thread.



  15. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server


    "Michael B. Trausch" wrote in message news:20081015130739.58e1ddef@zest...
    > On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 09:59:28 -0700
    > "Adam" wrote:
    >
    > > Thanks for the heads up.
    > >
    > > Yes, you're right about the router's DHCP service.
    > > I only have two systems (desktop/server & laptop) on
    > > the network so I haven't had any IP address problems yet.
    > > I just have to be sure the desktop/server is powered on first.
    > > I like using DHCP, especially for the laptop, since
    > > I can plug it into most any company's network.
    > > Is there a better way?

    >
    > You can always just configure the desktop to use a static IP address.
    > Though, it might be easier if you tell your router to give the desktop
    > a static DHCP-assigned address. That would work, too... tell it to,
    > for example, always give MAC address XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX the IP
    > 192.168.1.5 (for example). This assumes that your router supports that
    > functionality.
    >
    > --- Mike
    >
    > --
    > My sigfile ran away and is on hiatus.
    >


    Cool! Didn't know some routers can do that.
    I'll have to look into it.



  16. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: throws clock out of sync for Windows

    On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 10:14:36 -0700, Adam wrote:

    > On my Ubuntu/Windows multi-boot system, the clock gets thrown way out of
    > sync when booting into Windows after Ubuntu. What gives? I have to
    > adjust the clock every time I boot into Windows after Ubuntu. What do I
    > need to do to fix this?


    Linux usually views the system clock as being UTC while Windows assumes
    it is Localtime. Take a look at this guide what you can do:

    http://tinyurl.com/5fjzmn

  17. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: How to setup Ubuntu print server


    "Derek Turner" wrote in message news:6llnpoFcsg83U6@mid.individual.net...
    > On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 23:41:21 -0700, Adam wrote:
    >
    >
    > >> I thought CUPS is needed for print server and samba is needed for file
    > >> server. Didn't know samba is needed for Ubuntu print server as well.

    >
    > In that case you've learned something. Samba is needed to share files and
    > printers over a Windows Workgroup.
    > >
    > >
    > > Also, Places->Network File Browser shows "Windows Network" but
    > > double-clicking comes up empty.

    >
    > For /****'s/ sake learn to snip!



    Sheesh! You could be nicer about it.



  18. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: throws clock out of sync for Windows

    "Adam" wrote in
    news:gd58hg$3ue$1@registered.motzarella.org:

    >
    > "Adam" wrote in message
    > news:gd58f6$3j1$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    >> On my Ubuntu/Windows multi-boot system,
    >> the clock gets thrown way out of sync when
    >> booting into Windows after Ubuntu. What gives?
    >> I have to adjust the clock every time I boot into
    >> Windows after Ubuntu. What do I need to do to fix this?
    >>

    >
    > Oops! What's this doing here.
    > It should be a new thread.
    >
    >


    It appeared here as a new thread.....but I have noticed seemingly other
    misplaced messages in other newsgroups....starting to wonder now if there
    is something wonkey with the motzarella feed somehow.


  19. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: throws clock out of sync for Windows


    "propman" wrote in message
    news:Xns9B3876D2E190Dpropmhotmailcom@85.214.105.20 9...
    > "Adam" wrote in
    > news:gd58hg$3ue$1@registered.motzarella.org:
    >
    > >
    > > "Adam" wrote in message
    > > news:gd58f6$3j1$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    > >> On my Ubuntu/Windows multi-boot system,
    > >> the clock gets thrown way out of sync when
    > >> booting into Windows after Ubuntu. What gives?
    > >> I have to adjust the clock every time I boot into
    > >> Windows after Ubuntu. What do I need to do to fix this?
    > >>

    > >
    > > Oops! What's this doing here.
    > > It should be a new thread.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > It appeared here as a new thread.....but I have noticed seemingly other
    > misplaced messages in other newsgroups....starting to wonder now if there
    > is something wonkey with the motzarella feed somehow.
    >


    No, it's something that I (not motzarella) did.
    motzarella works great.



  20. Re: Linux/Ubuntu: throws clock out of sync for Windows

    In <6lmmv9Fd2ujdU1@mid.individual.net> Thomas Jespersen:

    [Snip...]

    > Linux usually views the system clock as being UTC while Windows assumes
    > it is Localtime.


    I'd like to know on Kubuntu how to toggle between UTC and Local, as offered
    during install (but not afterward, AFAICT).

    (On SuSE 10.0 it's YaST->System->Date and Time->Hardware Clock Set To)

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    I toss GoogleGroup posts from gitgo (http://improve-usenet.org).

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast