help - ping yes, route no - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on help - ping yes, route no - Ubuntu ; On 2008-10-10, joe finn wrote: > I installed Ubuntu 8.04 on 2 desktop machines that are on a LAN with my > Windows XP laptop. Both show the laptop on the network folder. Both can > reach the internet. (both ...

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Thread: help - ping yes, route no

  1. Re: help - ping yes, route no

    On 2008-10-10, joe finn wrote:
    > I installed Ubuntu 8.04 on 2 desktop machines that are on a LAN with my
    > Windows XP laptop. Both show the laptop on the network folder. Both can
    > reach the internet. (both are running folding@home right now!) But they
    > cannot network with each other. I would think that the second
    > installation would detect the first but apparently not.
    >
    > So I went into System> Administration> Network [wired
    > connection][properties] and changed to:
    > Static IP address
    > 192.168.0.2
    > 255.255.255.0
    > 192.168.0.1
    >
    > on "joe-desktop1" and
    >
    > 192.168.0.10
    > 255.255.255.0
    > 192.168.0.1
    >
    > on "joe-desktop"
    >
    > Then I could ping each from the other but nothing more.
    >
    >
    > joe@joe-desktop1:~/f$ route -n
    > Kernel IP routing table
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use
    > Iface
    > 192.168.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
    > 169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 1000 0 0 eth0
    > 0.0.0.0 192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
    >
    > route -n is the same for both machines.
    >
    > I tried several sudo route add commands but they didn't open up the network.
    >
    > I'm out of ideas. TIA


    You certainly do not need additional routes, as they are on the same
    subnet, and able to ping each other. They are, indeed, networked.

    Now, the question is: What are you trying to do that you are having
    problems with? If you are trying to share files, have you opened file
    shares? What protocol are you trying to use? Have you installed nfs
    or samba? How are they configured?

    Since you have two linux machines and a Windows XP laptop, you'll
    probably want samba. Once it is installed, you'll want to configure
    it to be on the same "workgroup" as the laptop. Once this is
    configured on both linux machines, you should be able to browse
    between the machine shares using the "Network" icon, or you can
    configure fstab to mount the shares of the other machines.

    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  2. help - ping yes, route no

    I installed Ubuntu 8.04 on 2 desktop machines that are on a LAN with my
    Windows XP laptop. Both show the laptop on the network folder. Both can
    reach the internet. (both are running folding@home right now!) But they
    cannot network with each other. I would think that the second
    installation would detect the first but apparently not.

    So I went into System> Administration> Network [wired
    connection][properties] and changed to:
    Static IP address
    192.168.0.2
    255.255.255.0
    192.168.0.1

    on "joe-desktop1" and

    192.168.0.10
    255.255.255.0
    192.168.0.1

    on "joe-desktop"

    Then I could ping each from the other but nothing more.


    joe@joe-desktop1:~/f$ route -n
    Kernel IP routing table
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use
    Iface
    192.168.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
    169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 1000 0 0 eth0
    0.0.0.0 192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0

    route -n is the same for both machines.

    I tried several sudo route add commands but they didn't open up the network.

    I'm out of ideas. TIA

    Joe Finn







  3. Re: help - ping yes, route no

    joe finn wrote in
    news:CZWdnTTZW-V0c3PVnZ2dnUVZ_sLinZ2d@ez2.net:


    > eth0 169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 1000 0



    http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-460698.html





  4. Re: help - ping yes, route no

    On Fri, 10 Oct 2008 00:58:56 -0600, joe finn wrote:

    > I installed Ubuntu 8.04 on 2 desktop machines that are on a LAN with my
    > Windows XP laptop. Both show the laptop on the network folder. Both can
    > reach the internet. (both are running folding@home right now!) But they
    > cannot network with each other. I would think that the second
    > installation would detect the first but apparently not.
    >
    > So I went into System> Administration> Network [wired
    > connection][properties] and changed to:
    > Static IP address
    > 192.168.0.2
    > 255.255.255.0
    > 192.168.0.1
    >
    > on "joe-desktop1" and
    >
    > 192.168.0.10
    > 255.255.255.0
    > 192.168.0.1
    >
    > on "joe-desktop"
    >
    > Then I could ping each from the other but nothing more.
    >
    >
    > joe@joe-desktop1:~/f$ route -n
    > Kernel IP routing table
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use
    > Iface
    > 192.168.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
    > 169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 1000 0 0 eth0
    > 0.0.0.0 192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
    >
    > route -n is the same for both machines.
    >
    > I tried several sudo route add commands but they didn't open up the network.
    >
    > I'm out of ideas. TIA
    >
    > Joe Finn


    You don't have a routing problem. You just need programs that talk to
    each other over your network. You can use samba, nfs, or ssh as some of
    the more common ones. I routinely use ssh and sshfs on my home network.
    OpenSSH-server is not installed by default in Ubuntu; you have to add it
    yourself.

    --
    MarkA
    Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
    About eight o'clock


  5. Re: help - ping yes, route no

    MarkA wrote:
    > On Fri, 10 Oct 2008 00:58:56 -0600, joe finn wrote:
    > You don't have a routing problem. You just need programs that talk to
    > each other over your network. You can use samba, nfs, or ssh as some of
    > the more common ones. I routinely use ssh and sshfs on my home network.
    > OpenSSH-server is not installed by default in Ubuntu; you have to add it
    > yourself.
    >


    Thanks.

    I got it working. I installed ssh and tightVNC. There ought to be a how
    too. It took too long to figure out.

    Joe Finn

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