Revisiting an old question - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Revisiting an old question - Ubuntu ; Risking the wrath of the intelligentsia here: Some time ago I mentioned the oddest problem. It happens in Open Office Writer and in KWord, but the OO problem is the most vexing. I can turn on non-printing characters and see ...

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  1. Revisiting an old question

    Risking the wrath of the intelligentsia here:

    Some time ago I mentioned the oddest problem. It happens in Open Office
    Writer and in KWord, but the OO problem is the most vexing.

    I can turn on non-printing characters and see where the paragraph marks
    are. When I turn on the search and replace function, I can indicate I
    want to search for a special character, and a series of characters
    appears. The paragraph mark appears twice in the chart -- I have no idea
    why. But searching for either of the paragraph marks fails to find any
    of the marks in the text.

    Does anyone know how to search for the paragraph marks in Open Office?

    Thanks.

  2. Re: Revisiting an old question

    On 10/10/08 15:22, Jeffrey Needle wrote:
    > Risking the wrath of the intelligentsia here:
    >
    > Some time ago I mentioned the oddest problem. It happens in Open Office
    > Writer and in KWord, but the OO problem is the most vexing.
    >
    > I can turn on non-printing characters and see where the paragraph marks
    > are. When I turn on the search and replace function, I can indicate I
    > want to search for a special character, and a series of characters
    > appears. The paragraph mark appears twice in the chart -- I have no idea
    > why. But searching for either of the paragraph marks fails to find any
    > of the marks in the text.
    >
    > Does anyone know how to search for the paragraph marks in Open Office?
    >
    > Thanks.



    OpenOffice has a geeky solution involving "regular expressions".

    In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar sign
    "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".

    For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in the
    "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and click
    on "List of Regular Expressions".

    This advice is based on OO 2.3.

  3. Re: Revisiting an old question

    James C wrote:
    > On 10/10/08 15:22, Jeffrey Needle wrote:
    >> Risking the wrath of the intelligentsia here:
    >>
    >> Some time ago I mentioned the oddest problem. It happens in Open
    >> Office Writer and in KWord, but the OO problem is the most vexing.
    >>
    >> I can turn on non-printing characters and see where the paragraph
    >> marks are. When I turn on the search and replace function, I can
    >> indicate I want to search for a special character, and a series of
    >> characters appears. The paragraph mark appears twice in the chart --
    >> I have no idea why. But searching for either of the paragraph marks
    >> fails to find any of the marks in the text.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know how to search for the paragraph marks in Open Office?
    >>
    >> Thanks.

    >
    >
    > OpenOffice has a geeky solution involving "regular expressions".
    >
    > In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    > "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar sign
    > "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    > metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    >
    > For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in the
    > "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and click
    > on "List of Regular Expressions".
    >
    > This advice is based on OO 2.3.


    Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.

    Thanks for the try.

  4. Re: Revisiting an old question

    In article ,
    Jeff Needle wrote:
    > James C wrote:
    > > On 10/10/08 15:22, Jeffrey Needle wrote:
    > >> Risking the wrath of the intelligentsia here:
    > >>
    > >> Some time ago I mentioned the oddest problem. It happens in Open
    > >> Office Writer and in KWord, but the OO problem is the most vexing.
    > >>
    > >> I can turn on non-printing characters and see where the paragraph
    > >> marks are. When I turn on the search and replace function, I can
    > >> indicate I want to search for a special character, and a series of
    > >> characters appears. The paragraph mark appears twice in the chart --
    > >> I have no idea why. But searching for either of the paragraph marks
    > >> fails to find any of the marks in the text.
    > >>
    > >> Does anyone know how to search for the paragraph marks in Open Office?

    > >
    > > OpenOffice has a geeky solution involving "regular expressions".
    > >
    > > In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    > > "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar sign
    > > "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    > > metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    > >
    > > For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in the
    > > "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and click
    > > on "List of Regular Expressions".
    > >
    > > This advice is based on OO 2.3.

    >
    > Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.


    Maybe it was searching for a literal dollar sign? Just for kicks,
    insert "$" _not_ at the end of a line and see what it finds.

    --
    -eben QebWenE01R@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81
    LIBRA: A big promotion is just around the corner for someone
    much more talented than you. Laughter is the very best medicine,
    remember that when your appendix bursts next week. -- Weird Al

  5. Re: Revisiting an old question

    >> >
    >> > In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    >> > "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar
    >> > sign "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    >> > metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    >> >
    >> > For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in
    >> > the "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and
    >> > click on "List of Regular Expressions".
    >> >
    >> > This advice is based on OO 2.3.

    >>
    >> Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.

    >
    > Maybe it was searching for a literal dollar sign? Just for kicks,
    > insert "$" _not_ at the end of a line and see what it finds.


    Well, I tried it all again, and it worked! What a relief! For the
    record, it also works in kword.

    Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search for $
    $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this is.

    I suppose it could be more intuitive, eh?

    Thanks to all -- the problem is finally solved.

  6. Re: Revisiting an old question

    On 10/11/2008 08:15 AM Jeffrey Needle scribbled:

    >>>> In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    >>>> "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar
    >>>> sign "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    >>>> metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    >>>>
    >>>> For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in
    >>>> the "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and
    >>>> click on "List of Regular Expressions".
    >>>>
    >>>> This advice is based on OO 2.3.
    >>> Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.

    >> Maybe it was searching for a literal dollar sign? Just for kicks,
    >> insert "$" _not_ at the end of a line and see what it finds.

    >
    > Well, I tried it all again, and it worked! What a relief! For the
    > record, it also works in kword.
    >
    > Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search for $
    > $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this is.
    >
    > I suppose it could be more intuitive, eh?


    heh, it /is/ about intuitive as m$ word. The spreadsheet program is a
    bear as well but it works...
    lord, do I miss volkswriter and quattro...


  7. Re: Revisiting an old question

    Jeffrey Needle wrote:

    >>> >
    >>> > In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    >>> > "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar
    >>> > sign "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    >>> > metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    >>> >
    >>> > For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in
    >>> > the "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and
    >>> > click on "List of Regular Expressions".
    >>> >
    >>> > This advice is based on OO 2.3.
    >>>
    >>> Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.

    >>
    >> Maybe it was searching for a literal dollar sign? Just for kicks,
    >> insert "$" _not_ at the end of a line and see what it finds.

    >
    > Well, I tried it all again, and it worked! What a relief! For the
    > record, it also works in kword.
    >
    > Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search for $
    > $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this is.


    $ matches to "end of line", ^ to "beginning of line". There aren't any
    two end-of-lines without a beginning-of-line in between.

    ^$ matches to any line that doesn't contain any character


    > I suppose it could be more intuitive, eh?


    Regular expressions are a very powerful, but not necessary intuitive
    concept that is supported by a wide range of programs.


    Florian
    --

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Hi! I'm a signature virus! Copy me into your signature, please! **
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

  8. Re: Revisiting an old question

    jrg wrote:
    > On 10/11/2008 08:15 AM Jeffrey Needle scribbled:
    >
    >>>>> In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    >>>>> "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar
    >>>>> sign "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    >>>>> metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    >>>>>
    >>>>> For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in
    >>>>> the "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and
    >>>>> click on "List of Regular Expressions".
    >>>>>
    >>>>> This advice is based on OO 2.3.
    >>>> Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.
    >>> Maybe it was searching for a literal dollar sign? Just for kicks,
    >>> insert "$" _not_ at the end of a line and see what it finds.

    >> Well, I tried it all again, and it worked! What a relief! For the
    >> record, it also works in kword.
    >>
    >> Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search for $
    >> $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this is.
    >>
    >> I suppose it could be more intuitive, eh?

    >
    > heh, it /is/ about intuitive as m$ word. The spreadsheet program is a
    > bear as well but it works...
    > lord, do I miss volkswriter and quattro...
    >


    Man, that's a blast from the past. Volkswriter!!! Yeah, I used
    Wordstar for a long time. And Office Writer was pretty good, too.
    Quattro burst on the screen and gave everyone a thrill.

    Now, everything is bloated and ugly. Oh well.

  9. Re: Revisiting an old question

    >> Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search for $
    >> $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this is.

    >
    > $ matches to "end of line", ^ to "beginning of line". There aren't any
    > two end-of-lines without a beginning-of-line in between.
    >
    > ^$ matches to any line that doesn't contain any character
    >
    >
    >> I suppose it could be more intuitive, eh?

    >
    > Regular expressions are a very powerful, but not necessary intuitive
    > concept that is supported by a wide range of programs.
    >
    >
    > Florian


    Thanks for the good information. I'm learning that I need to learn more
    about regular expressions.

  10. Re: Revisiting an old question

    On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 01:37:09 -0400, Jeff Needle wrote:

    >>> Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search
    >>> for $ $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this
    >>> is.

    >>
    >> $ matches to "end of line", ^ to "beginning of line". There aren't any
    >> two end-of-lines without a beginning-of-line in between.
    >>
    >> ^$ matches to any line that doesn't contain any character
    >>
    >>
    >>> I suppose it could be more intuitive, eh?

    >>
    >> Regular expressions are a very powerful, but not necessary intuitive
    >> concept that is supported by a wide range of programs.
    >>
    >>
    >> Florian

    >
    > Thanks for the good information. I'm learning that I need to learn more
    > about regular expressions.


    There are some programs out there that let you play with regular
    expressions and/or help you build up complex ones:

    --> gregexp A graphical regular expression explorer

    "GRegExp Explorer is a graphical regular expression explorer based on
    the PCRE regular expression library. It is possible to test regular
    expressions on the fly and check the result in detail."

    No URL was given for a further description but there are some .png
    images at the download directory at:

    http://dentrassi.de/download/gregexp/

    --> tkregexp An interactive regexp design tool

    "This software will let you design your regexps by letting you type the
    expression and visualize its effect on a sample of your choice."

    http://laurent.riesterer.free.fr/regexp/

    --> txt2regex A Regular Expression "wizard"

    "Txt2regex is a Regular Expression Wizard that converts human
    sentences to regexes. In a simple interactive console interface, the
    user answer questions and the program build the regexes for more than
    20 programs, like Vim, Emacs, Perl, PHP, Python, Procmail and
    OpenOffice.org. It is a Shell Script 100% written with Bash builtin
    commands. No compilation or extra commands are needed, just download
    and run."

    http://txt2regex.sourceforge.net/

    txt2regx is, I believe, a command-line program. The other two use a GUI.

    I'm in FreeBSD at the moment, so I can't check to see if these are
    available under synaptics. I'd be surprised if they weren't, though.

  11. Re: Revisiting an old question

    In article <0ou7s5-dql.ln1@mid.florian-diesch.de>,
    Florian Diesch wrote:
    > Jeffrey Needle wrote:
    >
    > >>> >
    > >>> > In the "Find & Replace" dialog, click "More Options" and check the
    > >>> > "Regular expressions" box. In the "Search for" box, enter a dollar
    > >>> > sign "$" (without the quotes), which is the "regular expression
    > >>> > metacharacter" for end-of-line. Then hit "Find" or "Find All".
    > >>> >
    > >>> > For more info about regular expressions, click the "Help" button in
    > >>> > the "Find & Replace" dialog, scroll down to "Regular expressions" and
    > >>> > click on "List of Regular Expressions".
    > >>> >
    > >>> > This advice is based on OO 2.3.
    > >>>
    > >>> Ach, I tried that, but OO didn't find anything. Very frustrating.
    > >>
    > >> Maybe it was searching for a literal dollar sign? Just for kicks,
    > >> insert "$" _not_ at the end of a line and see what it finds.

    > >
    > > Well, I tried it all again, and it worked! What a relief! For the
    > > record, it also works in kword.
    > >
    > > Oddly if you want to find a double carriage return, you can't search for $
    > > $. You have to use ^$ instead. What a weird thing all of this is.

    >
    > $ matches to "end of line", ^ to "beginning of line". There aren't any
    > two end-of-lines without a beginning-of-line in between.
    >
    > ^$ matches to any line that doesn't contain any character


    And [^$] matches any character except a literal $, and [$^] matches
    either $ or ^. REs are logical (once you learn the logic), but
    probably not as simple as they look.

    --
    -eben QebWenE01R@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81
    LIBRA: A big promotion is just around the corner for someone
    much more talented than you. Laughter is the very best medicine,
    remember that when your appendix bursts next week. -- Weird Al

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