Linux distribution of TomTom home - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Linux distribution of TomTom home - Ubuntu ; On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 13:55:01 +0100, dennis@home wrote: > Most consumers probably never connect their tomtom to a computer so its > hardly a disservice. > I am sure they can find someone with windows to do the odd ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 59

Thread: Linux distribution of TomTom home

  1. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 13:55:01 +0100, dennis@home wrote:


    > Most consumers probably never connect their tomtom to a computer so its
    > hardly a disservice.
    > I am sure they can find someone with windows to do the odd update for them.
    > I doubt if they even now what the quickfix updates do so they aren't going
    > to miss them.
    > I doubt if most will ever update the maps, at less than 100 for a new
    > tomtom it isn't worth paying 40 for maps.


    Not true.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
    Please Visit www.linsux.org

  2. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home



    "teabag" wrote in message
    news:1xjw6yjdei0fe$.dlg@home.attbi.invalid...
    > On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 13:55:01 +0100, dennis@home wrote:
    >
    >> "teabag" wrote in message
    >> news:u74hgueq70w7$.dlg@home.attbi.invalid...
    >>> On Mon, 22 Sep 2008 16:43:41 GMT, SINNER wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Any Linux based device, embedded or otherwise, that is not accessible
    >>>> via
    >>>> the linux desktop (but is accessible via That Other Desktop) has
    >>>> performed
    >>>> a diservice to the consumer IMO.
    >>>
    >>> The file system on the TomTom device is accessable on the desktop. Its
    >>> the
    >>> update path, etc. that is not. Other than that I must agree.

    >>
    >> Most consumers probably never connect their tomtom to a computer so its
    >> hardly a disservice.
    >> I am sure they can find someone with windows to do the odd update for
    >> them.
    >> I doubt if they even now what the quickfix updates do so they aren't
    >> going
    >> to miss them.
    >> I doubt if most will ever update the maps, at less than 100 for a new
    >> tomtom it isn't worth paying 40 for maps.

    >
    > You may be behind the times. On Windows machine: plugg TomTom into USB
    > port; first time you will be asked if you want to install TomTom Home;
    > after installing connct to computer click button to download map revisions
    > and satel;ite positions. No cost!


    No cost for 12 months.
    They aren't very good at putting the fixes in either.
    Some things you can't fix with the primitive editor, like:

    splitting a road into more segments when they have got the names wrong
    adding in a new estate as it will only let you add roads to existing roads

    Much better than it used to be but still not worth it for most people so
    they don't connect it to a computer.

    Of course Tomtom want them to connect to a computer so that they can try and
    sell them extras.


  3. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    In article ,
    SINNER wrote:
    > > What's weird is that you'd find it weird, since the fact that it runs
    > > Linux neither makes it easier to provide Linux desktop support nor
    > > harder to provide Linux desktop support for it. What software runs on
    > > the device, hidden away behind a USB interface, is almost completely
    > > irrelevant when it comes to writing desktop software to talk to that
    > > device.
    > >

    >
    > Since it would seem logical that same guys that develop the software also
    > develop ways to access said software from the desktop, I think its weird
    > that you think its weird that a linux based device isnt expected by its
    > consumers to be easily accessible via a Linux Desktop.


    It's probably *not* the same guys. The most likely division of labor is
    that there are people who work on the software that runs *on* the
    device, and a different set of people that work on the software that
    runs on the desktop to administer the device.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  4. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home



    "Moshe Goldfarb." wrote in message
    news:1g6i8aculoq6t$.17f3o4gh6ixkh.dlg@40tude.net.. .
    > On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 13:55:01 +0100, dennis@home wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Most consumers probably never connect their tomtom to a computer so its
    >> hardly a disservice.
    >> I am sure they can find someone with windows to do the odd update for
    >> them.
    >> I doubt if they even now what the quickfix updates do so they aren't
    >> going
    >> to miss them.
    >> I doubt if most will ever update the maps, at less than 100 for a new
    >> tomtom it isn't worth paying 40 for maps.

    >
    > Not true.



    Go on then provide the figures of how many tomtoms have been sold vs. how
    many are registered with tomtom home.


  5. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    Tim Smith wrote:
    > It's probably *not* the same guys. The most likely division of labor is
    > that there are people who work on the software that runs *on* the
    > device, and a different set of people that work on the software that
    > runs on the desktop to administer the device.
    >
    >

    Most likely different guys on different continents.
    I did some contract work a while back for Tektronix on a video
    collaboration system and wound up testing software to run the same on
    Sun Solaris and windows. The hardware was made in China and I had to
    submit bug reports for the Indian programming team to work on overnight,
    then the next morning I would rebuild and test again.
    Globalization 101.

    As to the Tom Tom, never buy anything you have to pay for after you have
    walked out the door or it becomes an expense that doesn't go away, like
    satellite radio.
    My 'Jack Benny' cheap mode.

    Bill Baka

  6. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    * dennis@home wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    >
    >
    > "Moshe Goldfarb." wrote in message
    > news:1g6i8aculoq6t$.17f3o4gh6ixkh.dlg@40tude.net.. .
    >> On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 13:55:01 +0100, dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Most consumers probably never connect their tomtom to a computer so
    >>> its hardly a disservice.
    >>> I am sure they can find someone with windows to do the odd update
    >>> for them.
    >>> I doubt if they even now what the quickfix updates do so they aren't
    >>> going
    >>> to miss them.
    >>> I doubt if most will ever update the maps, at less than 100 for a
    >>> new tomtom it isn't worth paying 40 for maps.

    >>
    >> Not true.

    >
    >
    > Go on then provide the figures of how many tomtoms have been sold vs.
    > how many are registered with tomtom home.
    >


    How about you provide numbers for ones that dont?

    --
    David

  7. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    * Bill Baka wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    > Tim Smith wrote:
    >> It's probably *not* the same guys. The most likely division of labor
    >> is that there are people who work on the software that runs *on* the
    >> device, and a different set of people that work on the software that
    >> runs on the desktop to administer the device.
    >>
    >>

    > Most likely different guys on different continents.
    > I did some contract work a while back for Tektronix on a video
    > collaboration system and wound up testing software to run the same on
    > Sun Solaris and windows. The hardware was made in China and I had to
    > submit bug reports for the Indian programming team to work on
    > overnight, then the next morning I would rebuild and test again.
    > Globalization 101.
    >
    > As to the Tom Tom, never buy anything you have to pay for after you
    > have walked out the door or it becomes an expense that doesn't go
    > away, like satellite radio.
    > My 'Jack Benny' cheap mode.
    >
    > Bill Baka
    >


    With Sateltite you get something you dont get with standard radio (varied
    play lists, commercial free music, etc), if those features are worth it to
    you, its worth the recurring cost. If you live life thinking youll never
    have to 'subscribe' to anything, you miss out on a lot of things worth
    trying.

    You dont have Cable? A Cell Phone?

    --
    David

  8. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    In article , SINNER wrote:
    >* Bill Baka wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    (snip)
    >> As to the Tom Tom, never buy anything you have to pay for after you
    >> have walked out the door or it becomes an expense that doesn't go
    >> away, like satellite radio.
    >> My 'Jack Benny' cheap mode.


    >With Sateltite you get something you dont get with standard radio (varied
    >play lists, commercial free music, etc), if those features are worth it to
    >you, its worth the recurring cost. If you live life thinking youll never
    >have to 'subscribe' to anything, you miss out on a lot of things worth
    >trying.
    >
    >You dont have Cable? A Cell Phone?


    Correct on both counts Why would I ? One lets me watch even more crap and
    the other lets anyone contact me at any time wherever I am. Why would I want
    to allow either of these things ? Just because you can do something doesn't
    make it a good idea.

    "Subscription 'services' " are an absolute waste of dosh.



  9. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    > What's weird is that you'd find it weird, since the fact that it runs
    > Linux neither makes it easier to provide Linux desktop support nor
    > harder to provide Linux desktop support for it.


    It's not a matter of technology, but a matter of ethics.
    If they got a benefit with Linux supporting FOC their device
    development, it would have been fair to return at least a support for
    Linux users.

  10. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    * Bruce Sinclair wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    > In article , SINNER
    > wrote:
    >>* Bill Baka wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    > (snip)
    >>> As to the Tom Tom, never buy anything you have to pay for after you
    >>> have walked out the door or it becomes an expense that doesn't go
    >>> away, like satellite radio.
    >>> My 'Jack Benny' cheap mode.

    >
    >>With Sateltite you get something you dont get with standard radio
    >>(varied play lists, commercial free music, etc), if those features are
    >>worth it to you, its worth the recurring cost. If you live life
    >>thinking youll never have to 'subscribe' to anything, you miss out on
    >>a lot of things worth trying.
    >>
    >>You dont have Cable? A Cell Phone?

    >
    > Correct on both counts Why would I ? One lets me watch even more
    > crap


    There are plenty of educational programs available, gotta love choice.

    > and the other lets anyone contact me at any time wherever I am.


    Unfortunately, my job requires that I carry one, on the upside, they also
    pay for it. BTW, Just because it rings, dosent mean you have to answer
    and they come with silent/vibrate options and even an OFF switch! What if
    YOU need to conatact someone wherever YOU are? Pay phones arent on every
    corner anymore!

    > Why would I want to allow either of these things ?


    I can think of a few reasons.

    > Just because you
    > can do something doesn't make it a good idea.


    Agreed!

    > "Subscription 'services' " are an absolute waste of dosh.


    One man's dosh....

    --
    David

  11. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 23:11:05 +0000, Bruce Sinclair wrote:

    > "Subscription 'services' " are an absolute waste of dosh.
    >
    >


    Many people pay for internet access. Is your connection free?

  12. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    SINNER wrote:
    >
    > With Sateltite you get something you dont get with standard radio (varied
    > play lists, commercial free music, etc), if those features are worth it to
    > you, its worth the recurring cost. If you live life thinking youll never
    > have to 'subscribe' to anything, you miss out on a lot of things worth
    > trying.
    >
    > You dont have Cable? A Cell Phone?
    >
    >

    Cable TV times 3 rooms, cable Internet, 5 cell phones.

    The satellite radio is just another expense on top of the gas these days.
    When I am driving a car I tend to not use the radio most of the time,
    but listen for car noises, sirens, etc.
    Some months I don't even drive but bicycle around town, very low tech
    but good for the wallet and heart, and I don't feel I'm missing anything.
    I carry my cell everywhere, turned 'OFF' until I want to make a call, so
    it is a tool and not an addiction.
    My 'me' time is usually spent out of range anyway, and face to face
    meeting people is a good thing.
    As far as the TomTom goes, I have no need of one since I would rather
    explore in person than look at a map.
    Now, if it is programmed in Linux, that may be a topic.
    Enough OT.
    Bill Baka

  13. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    In article , SINNER wrote:
    >* Bruce Sinclair wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:
    >> In article , SINNER
    >> wrote:
    >>>* Bill Baka wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    >> (snip)
    >>>You dont have Cable? A Cell Phone?

    >>
    >> Correct on both counts Why would I ? One lets me watch even more
    >> crap

    >
    >There are plenty of educational programs available, gotta love choice.


    While there might be, that still doesn't alter the fact that cable merely
    provides more of the same. Crap. Just more channels of it. I suggest that
    generally, cable lowers the standard, rather than raising it.

    >> and the other lets anyone contact me at any time wherever I am.

    >
    >Unfortunately, my job requires that I carry one, on the upside, they also
    >pay for it.


    I used to say that you could not pay me enough to carry one. I have
    changed that. Yes you could pay me enough ... but it would be a lot. A very
    large amount ... and it would be off most of the time (as you suggest below)


    > BTW, Just because it rings, dosent mean you have to answer
    >and they come with silent/vibrate options and even an OFF switch! What if
    >YOU need to conatact someone wherever YOU are? Pay phones arent on every
    >corner anymore!


    I don't. Nothing is that urgent. Ever.

    >> Why would I want to allow either of these things ?

    >I can think of a few reasons.


    I can too. If I was a sole trader in business. That's about it. Anyone who
    thinks they are so important they have to have one is simply wrong. ... and
    there are a few of those. Remember the guys talkiing loudly into their new
    'brick' cell phones, only to have them ring while they were ? Those guys are
    still around ... only there's more of them and they've got sillier.

    >> Just because you
    >> can do something doesn't make it a good idea.

    >
    >Agreed!
    >
    >> "Subscription 'services' " are an absolute waste of dosh.

    >One man's dosh....


    Nope ... it only encourages them - not a good idea. MS have said they would
    much rather sell a subscription to s/w than 'licences' for s/w. I submit
    that, if they think it's a good idea for them, it's almost certainly a
    really bad idea for customers. It comes down to control again and I aint
    surrendering any more of mine..




  14. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    In article , jellybean stonerfish wrote:
    >On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 23:11:05 +0000, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >
    >> "Subscription 'services' " are an absolute waste of dosh.


    >Many people pay for internet access. Is your connection free?


    Not a subscription service. You are paying an ISP for a connection, not for
    content ... tho many would seriously like to change that it's still a bad
    idea.



  15. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    On 2008-09-24, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >
    >> BTW, Just because it rings, dosent mean you have to answer
    >>and they come with silent/vibrate options and even an OFF switch! What if
    >>YOU need to conatact someone wherever YOU are? Pay phones arent on every
    >>corner anymore!

    >
    > I don't. Nothing is that urgent. Ever.
    >


    Don't have kids? Don't have a car?

    My cell phone is always with me for emergencies. If the car breaks
    down at 2AM, or in a remote area, I don't want to have to hoof it
    looking for a phone. And with the kids, there is plenty of reason to
    have one. Kids get hurt at school, need to be transported to the
    hospital, but services cannot be done until they reach mom or dad to
    sign the forms... I'd rather not take the chance of being
    unreachable...

    I might get 2-3 calls per month on my cell, since I don't give anyone
    from work the number, but it is always with me, always on. I use it
    quite a bit for texting with friends and my wife, but that's about the
    extent of my normal use...

    And yet I wouldn't want to live without it...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  16. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    > I can too. If I was a sole trader in business. That's about it. Anyone who
    > thinks they are so important they have to have one is simply wrong. ... and
    > there are a few of those. Remember the guys talkiing loudly into their new
    > 'brick' cell phones, only to have them ring while they were ? Those guys are
    > still around ... only there's more of them and they've got sillier.
    >
    >

    I'm not one of them guys, but I did have a brick in 1971-1973 time
    period since I worked on them and kept a hand held just in case, and to
    impress the girls, which BTW, did work. It was an operator intense thing
    to make a call back then, since you had to give an operator your I.D.
    number and phone you wanted to connect to, but the audio was better on
    them than on my present cell phone.
    Silly is going to Walmart and watching all the people wander around
    yapping on their phones.
    I'm more purpose driven than B.S. driven like most cell users, so......
    Is this progress or just high tech toy stuff?
    Bill Baka

  17. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 21:01:52 +0100, dennis@home wrote:

    > "Moshe Goldfarb." wrote in message
    > news:1g6i8aculoq6t$.17f3o4gh6ixkh.dlg@40tude.net.. .
    >> On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 13:55:01 +0100, dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Most consumers probably never connect their tomtom to a computer so its
    >>> hardly a disservice.
    >>> I am sure they can find someone with windows to do the odd update for
    >>> them.
    >>> I doubt if they even now what the quickfix updates do so they aren't
    >>> going
    >>> to miss them.
    >>> I doubt if most will ever update the maps, at less than 100 for a new
    >>> tomtom it isn't worth paying 40 for maps.

    >>
    >> Not true.

    >
    >
    > Go on then provide the figures of how many tomtoms have been sold vs. how
    > many are registered with tomtom home.


    It's common sense....
    Also many of these GPS units provide trip planning software for the PC that
    makes planning say a vacation trip or longer trip much easier than plugging
    away with the buttons and screen on the GPS itself.

    This software AFAIK runs under Windows and Mac..

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
    Please Visit www.linsux.org

  18. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    In article , Joe wrote:
    >On 2008-09-24, Bruce Sinclair
    > wrote:
    >>
    >>> BTW, Just because it rings, dosent mean you have to answer
    >>>and they come with silent/vibrate options and even an OFF switch! What if
    >>>YOU need to conatact someone wherever YOU are? Pay phones arent on every
    >>>corner anymore!

    >>
    >> I don't. Nothing is that urgent. Ever.


    >Don't have kids? Don't have a car?


    Nope and yep. Even if the first was yep, nothing is that urgent.

    >My cell phone is always with me for emergencies. If the car breaks
    >down at 2AM, or in a remote area, I don't want to have to hoof it
    >looking for a phone. And with the kids, there is plenty of reason to
    >have one. Kids get hurt at school, need to be transported to the
    >hospital, but services cannot be done until they reach mom or dad to
    >sign the forms... I'd rather not take the chance of being
    >unreachable...


    Hmmm ... how did we ever survive before cell phones and bottled water
    I wonder .


  19. Re: Linux distribution of Tom Tom home

    Bruce Sinclair wrote:

    > I don't. Nothing is that urgent. Ever.


    In my job, there certainly is! Everything we do is time-constrained, and
    late or non-attendance is subject to very severe penalty payments.

    > MS have said they would much rather sell a subscription to s/w than
    > 'licences' for s/w. I submit that, if they think it's a good idea for
    > them, it's almost certainly a really bad idea for customers. It comes down
    > to control again and I ain't surrendering any more of mine..


    MS have tried "subscription" in some territories, and it proved to be a
    complete disaster. Everybody got their "free" copy of Windows and Office,
    paid the first (cheap) month's subscription to activate it, then refused to
    pay any more. It looked like a "Good Deal" - Windows and Office just for a
    minimal, one-off payment! Of course, this prevented them downloading any
    updates, which in turn led to a huge number of unpatched machines which
    fell prey to every new malware strain that was out there.

    This "business model" actually turned out to be a "Good Thing" for FOSS, as
    the unpatched Windows rapidly became even more unreliable (as if that was
    possible!), and business users - in particular - quickly stopped using the
    MS junk! MS quickly abandoned the experiment.

    C.


  20. Re: Linux distribution of TomTom home

    On 2008-09-25, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    > In article , Joe wrote:
    >>On 2008-09-24, Bruce Sinclair
    >> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> BTW, Just because it rings, dosent mean you have to answer
    >>>>and they come with silent/vibrate options and even an OFF switch! What if
    >>>>YOU need to conatact someone wherever YOU are? Pay phones arent on every
    >>>>corner anymore!
    >>>
    >>> I don't. Nothing is that urgent. Ever.

    >
    >>Don't have kids? Don't have a car?

    >
    > Nope and yep. Even if the first was yep, nothing is that urgent.


    Our priorities are clearly different...

    >
    >>My cell phone is always with me for emergencies. If the car breaks
    >>down at 2AM, or in a remote area, I don't want to have to hoof it
    >>looking for a phone. And with the kids, there is plenty of reason to
    >>have one. Kids get hurt at school, need to be transported to the
    >>hospital, but services cannot be done until they reach mom or dad to
    >>sign the forms... I'd rather not take the chance of being
    >>unreachable...

    >
    > Hmmm ... how did we ever survive before cell phones and bottled water
    > I wonder .
    >


    We survived, but that doesn't mean things were better... Hell, we
    survived before there were cars, electricity, running water, and a
    whole spate of other modern conveniences. That doesn't mean I'd want
    to go back to that...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast