Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive. - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive. - Ubuntu ; * Jeffrey Needle peremptorily fired off this memo: >> Did you create these CDs yourself? That can be an issue if you used >> special vendor-supplied software to create these CDs, or told your >> disk-createor software the wrong settings. ...

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Thread: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

  1. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

    * Jeffrey Needle peremptorily fired off this memo:

    >> Did you create these CDs yourself? That can be an issue if you used
    >> special vendor-supplied software to create these CDs, or told your
    >> disk-createor software the wrong settings.

    >
    > Nope, these were created by someone else.


    You might check with them to see what they did, then.

    >> Another potential issue is that they may be in UDF format, not ISO-9660
    >> format. In that case, you need to do, as root:
    >>
    >> $ modprobe udf

    >
    > FATAL: Error inserting udf (/lib/modules/2.6.24-19-generic/kernel/fs/udf/
    > udf.ko): Operation not permitted


    Oops. You must run modprobe as root or via sudo. Sorry!

    --
    Support your right to bare arms!
    -- A message from the National Short-Sleeved Shirt Association

  2. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

    * Jeffrey Needle peremptorily fired off this memo:

    >> On 22/08/08 10:45, Jeffrey Needle wrote:
    >>>> Did you create these CDs yourself? That can be an issue if you used
    >>>> special vendor-supplied software to create these CDs, or told your
    >>>> disk-createor software the wrong settings.
    >>>>
    >>> Nope, these were created by someone else.
    >>>
    >>>> Another potential issue is that they may be in UDF format, not
    >>>> ISO-9660 format. In that case, you need to do, as root:
    >>>>
    >>>> $ modprobe udf
    >>>>
    >>> FATAL: Error inserting udf
    >>> (/lib/modules/2.6.24-19-generic/kernel/fs/udf/ udf.ko): Operation not
    >>> permitted
    >>>

    >> sudo modprobe udf

    >
    > No error message when I enter the above, but nothing else, either.


    That's good. Now try "mount /cdrom" and see what happens.

    --
    Will the third world war keep "Bosom Buddies" off the air?

  3. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

    * Dan C peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > On Fri, 22 Aug 2008 21:38:09 +0000, Jeffrey Needle wrote:
    >
    >>> Have you tried this with a "factory" data CD? Not something which was
    >>> burned at home, especially the UDF crap. Try a known good factory CD
    >>> (not audio) and see what happens.

    >
    >> They're all factory CDs.

    >
    > Well then, the only possible explanation left is that your drive is ****ed
    > up. Put a different drive in and prove it.


    I think so, too. Even if the media were bad, you would at least see an
    error message other than "no media found".

    --
    Only a fool has no doubts.

  4. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

    > * Jeffrey Needle peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >>> Did you create these CDs yourself? That can be an issue if you used
    >>> special vendor-supplied software to create these CDs, or told your
    >>> disk-createor software the wrong settings.

    >>
    >> Nope, these were created by someone else.

    >
    > You might check with them to see what they did, then.
    >
    >>> Another potential issue is that they may be in UDF format, not
    >>> ISO-9660 format. In that case, you need to do, as root:
    >>>
    >>> $ modprobe udf

    >>
    >> FATAL: Error inserting udf
    >> (/lib/modules/2.6.24-19-generic/kernel/fs/udf/ udf.ko): Operation not
    >> permitted

    >
    > Oops. You must run modprobe as root or via sudo. Sorry!


    Again, thanks to all. Linux is suddenly seeing all the pieces attached
    to my computer. It's wonderful.

    Thanks!

  5. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

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    Linonut pravi:
    >> Well then, the only possible explanation left is that your drive is ****ed
    >> up. Put a different drive in and prove it.

    >
    > I think so, too. Even if the media were bad, you would at least see an
    > error message other than "no media found".


    Why?
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  6. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

    On 2008-08-26, Jure Sah hit the keyboard and wrote:
    >
    > Linonut pravi:
    >>> Well then, the only possible explanation left is that your drive is ****ed
    >>> up. Put a different drive in and prove it.

    >>
    >> I think so, too. Even if the media were bad, you would at least see an
    >> error message other than "no media found".

    >
    > Why?


    Well if the drive was partially OK but some sectors
    can't be read, you could *mount* the CD-ROM, but "ls -a
    /media/cdromX" for example would give out some error. One
    can read the sections which are fine without problems, but
    if one wants to look something on a messed up portion one
    would get some errors.

    I just tried to mount a empty cdrom in my dvd-drive:

    Among other messages it says this.

    mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/scd0,
    missing codepage or helper program, or other error

    Even "input/output" errors, or going beyond
    end of drive I've seen on bad CD-ROM's in my time.

    "no medium" found I can reproduce with a empty drive, trying
    to mount a empty CD-ROM one would always get this error:

    "mount: No medium found"

    I use most of the time a file-manager I customized over the
    years, and I don't want to miss it...




    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    "When science discovers the center of the universe, a lot of
    people will be disappointed to find they are not it."
    >> Bernard Baily <<


  7. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

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    Dragomir Kollaric pravi:
    >>> I think so, too. Even if the media were bad, you would at least see an
    >>> error message other than "no media found".

    >> Why?

    >
    > Well if the drive was partially OK but some sectors
    > can't be read, you could *mount* the CD-ROM, but "ls -a
    > /media/cdromX" for example would give out some error. One
    > can read the sections which are fine without problems, but
    > if one wants to look something on a messed up portion one
    > would get some errors.


    Hmm not exactly.

    You see, if the *drive* is faulty, there is no particular way in which
    it could fail to read only a few sectors and not the others.

    The CD/DVD drive does not contain sectors, it tries to read these from
    the disc. If the drive is faulty, this typically means either it's
    firmware is goners or the lens / motor is bust, it won't be able to
    confirm there is a disc in the drive in the first place.

    The CD/DVD disc is a reflective surface with a spiral data track, the
    first thing the CD/DVD drive needs to do when a disc is inserted, is
    focus the lens and then find the spiral track, it's firmware tries this.
    There is no way the drive could see a data track without being perfectly
    capable of reading from the disc. If it does not succeed in this after
    several retries for whatever reason, it concludes there is no disc in
    the drive. Any mechanical problem will result in this, and although
    firmware errors can result in anything, I find it somewhat unlikely that
    busted firmware would still be able to confirm finding the data track,
    but fail to send data to the motherboard.

    > mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/scd0,
    > missing codepage or helper program, or other error
    >
    > Even "input/output" errors, or going beyond
    > end of drive I've seen on bad CD-ROM's in my time.


    You are describing a disc or cabling problem.

    LP,
    Jure
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  8. Re: Getting Linux to see my CD-RW drive.

    On 2008-08-26, Jure Sah hit the keyboard and wrote:
    >
    > Dragomir Kollaric pravi:
    >>>> I think so, too. Even if the media were bad, you would at least see an
    >>>> error message other than "no media found".
    >>> Why?

    >>
    >> Well if the drive was partially OK but some sectors
    >> can't be read, you could *mount* the CD-ROM, but "ls -a
    >> /media/cdromX" for example would give out some error. One
    >> can read the sections which are fine without problems, but
    >> if one wants to look something on a messed up portion one
    >> would get some errors.

    >
    > Hmm not exactly.
    >
    > You see, if the *drive* is faulty, there is no particular way in which
    > it could fail to read only a few sectors and not the others.


    Sorry I there is a "typo" I meant of course CD-ROM disc.
    See below.

    >
    > The CD/DVD drive does not contain sectors, it tries to read these from
    > the disc. If the drive is faulty, this typically means either it's
    > firmware is goners or the lens / motor is bust, it won't be able to
    > confirm there is a disc in the drive in the first place.
    >
    > The CD/DVD disc is a reflective surface with a spiral data track, the
    > first thing the CD/DVD drive needs to do when a disc is inserted, is
    > focus the lens and then find the spiral track, it's firmware tries this.
    > There is no way the drive could see a data track without being perfectly
    > capable of reading from the disc. If it does not succeed in this after
    > several retries for whatever reason, it concludes there is no disc in
    > the drive. Any mechanical problem will result in this, and although
    > firmware errors can result in anything, I find it somewhat unlikely that
    > busted firmware would still be able to confirm finding the data track,
    > but fail to send data to the motherboard.


    Look I've had CD-ROM's I could partly read, one had folders
    with Data in them, I couldn't access at all. From 700MB
    about 550MB I could read the rest not. I don't know (and
    frankly I didn't bother to read up on it) what happened to a
    *perfectly* good CD-ROM going bad as I had made another
    copy. After the one got bad, I copied some other CD-ROM's as
    well once more which I want not to loose.


    >
    >> mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/scd0,
    >> missing codepage or helper program, or other error
    >>
    >> Even "input/output" errors, or going beyond
    >> end of drive I've seen on bad CD-ROM's in my time.

    >
    > You are describing a disc or cabling problem.


    No, no problem, simply a *empty* medium in a Linux box. If
    you have access to one working PC WITH a working CD-ROM
    DVD-ROM you could try it in a terminal, to see if I'm
    *reading* then message wrong.

    >
    > LP,
    > Jure




    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    "When science discovers the center of the universe, a lot of
    people will be disappointed to find they are not it."
    >> Bernard Baily <<


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