What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d? - Ubuntu ; I worked up a small script to disable some services. So far this is an out of the box Kubuntu (KDE4) install. Unfortunately this version removes a lot of the control we had in KDE3. After running the script in ...

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Thread: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

  1. What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    I worked up a small script to disable some services. So far this is an
    out of the box Kubuntu (KDE4) install. Unfortunately this version
    removes a lot of the control we had in KDE3. After running the script in
    the necessary rc?.d directories things have become more stable and even
    sped up. Is there anything else I should include in the script? The
    thing is this isn't a laptop and it isn't a new machine. I don't need a
    lot of this stuff running.

    ================
    sudo mv S10acpid K10acpid
    sudo mv S20apmd K20apmd
    sudo mv S25bluetooth K25bluetooth
    sudo mv S99acpi-support K99acpi-support
    =================

    Later
    Mike

  2. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    > I worked up a small script to disable some services. So far this is an
    > out of the box Kubuntu (KDE4) install. Unfortunately this version
    > removes a lot of the control we had in KDE3. After running the script in
    > the necessary rc?.d directories things have become more stable and even
    > sped up. Is there anything else I should include in the script? The
    > thing is this isn't a laptop and it isn't a new machine. I don't need a
    > lot of this stuff running.


    > ================
    > sudo mv S10acpid K10acpid
    > sudo mv S20apmd K20apmd
    > sudo mv S25bluetooth K25bluetooth
    > sudo mv S99acpi-support K99acpi-support
    > =================


    Probably you could uninstall these, too.

    I have disabled avahi-daemon and dbus (not sure if I might need the
    latter, though).

    Doesn't the README say you should do
    sudo mv S10acpid K90acpid
    sudo mv K20apmd K80acpid
    ...
    ...
    ?

    Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?

    --
    Niklaus

  3. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 15:20:57 +0000, Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:

    > The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    >> I worked up a small script to disable some services. So far this is an
    >> out of the box Kubuntu (KDE4) install. Unfortunately this version
    >> removes a lot of the control we had in KDE3. After running the script
    >> in the necessary rc?.d directories things have become more stable and
    >> even sped up. Is there anything else I should include in the script?
    >> The thing is this isn't a laptop and it isn't a new machine. I don't
    >> need a lot of this stuff running.
    >> sudo mv S10acpid K10acpid
    >> sudo mv S20apmd K20apmd
    >> sudo mv S25bluetooth K25bluetooth
    >> sudo mv S99acpi-support K99acpi-support

    >
    > Probably you could uninstall these, too.
    > I have disabled avahi-daemon and dbus (not sure if I might need the
    > latter, though). Doesn't the README say you should do
    > sudo mv S10acpid K90acpid
    > sudo mv K20apmd K80acpid
    > Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?


    Shouldn't you disable these using the GUI, i.e. SystemSettings=>Advanced=>
    SystemServices? I don't know how that works, probably changes permissions.
    Seems to me doing this from the command line when it's available via GUI
    could end up breaking the GUI.

  4. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    Roland Latour wrote:
    > On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 15:20:57 +0000, Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > >
    > > Probably you could uninstall these, too.
    > > I have disabled avahi-daemon and dbus (not sure if I might need the
    > > latter, though). Doesn't the README say you should do
    > > sudo mv S10acpid K90acpid
    > > sudo mv K20apmd K80acpid
    > > Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?


    > Shouldn't you disable these using the GUI, i.e. SystemSettings=>Advanced=>
    > SystemServices? I don't know how that works, probably changes permissions.


    No. I don't have anything called "SystemSettings=>Advanced" etc. But
    I know how it works.

    > Seems to me doing this from the command line when it's available via GUI
    > could end up breaking the GUI.


    I don't use things that break that easily.

    --
    Niklaus

  5. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    >> I worked up a small script to disable some services. So far this is an
    >> out of the box Kubuntu (KDE4) install. Unfortunately this version
    >> removes a lot of the control we had in KDE3. After running the script in
    >> the necessary rc?.d directories things have become more stable and even
    >> sped up. Is there anything else I should include in the script? The
    >> thing is this isn't a laptop and it isn't a new machine. I don't need a
    >> lot of this stuff running.

    >
    >> ================
    >> sudo mv S10acpid K10acpid
    >> sudo mv S20apmd K20apmd
    >> sudo mv S25bluetooth K25bluetooth
    >> sudo mv S99acpi-support K99acpi-support
    >> =================

    >
    > Probably you could uninstall these, too.


    Through the "add remove programs" or apt-get?

    > I have disabled avahi-daemon and dbus (not sure if I might need the
    > latter, though).


    I though avahi was related to USB. dbus (I think) is necessary for some
    programs to run. I thought it was something like hal.

    > Doesn't the README say you should do
    > sudo mv S10acpid K90acpid
    > sudo mv K20apmd K80acpid


    Second line should read K80apmd?

    > ...
    > ...
    > ?
    >
    > Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?
    >


    /etc/rc?.d ? = [2345]

    Later
    Mike

  6. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    Roland Latour wrote:
    > On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 15:20:57 +0000, Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    >
    >> The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    >>> I worked up a small script to disable some services. So far this is an
    >>> out of the box Kubuntu (KDE4) install. Unfortunately this version
    >>> removes a lot of the control we had in KDE3. After running the script
    >>> in the necessary rc?.d directories things have become more stable and
    >>> even sped up. Is there anything else I should include in the script?
    >>> The thing is this isn't a laptop and it isn't a new machine. I don't
    >>> need a lot of this stuff running.
    >>> sudo mv S10acpid K10acpid
    >>> sudo mv S20apmd K20apmd
    >>> sudo mv S25bluetooth K25bluetooth
    >>> sudo mv S99acpi-support K99acpi-support

    >> Probably you could uninstall these, too.
    >> I have disabled avahi-daemon and dbus (not sure if I might need the
    >> latter, though). Doesn't the README say you should do
    >> sudo mv S10acpid K90acpid
    >> sudo mv K20apmd K80acpid
    >> Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?

    >
    > Shouldn't you disable these using the GUI, i.e. SystemSettings=>Advanced=>
    > SystemServices? I don't know how that works, probably changes permissions.
    > Seems to me doing this from the command line when it's available via GUI
    > could end up breaking the GUI.


    It does the same thing as doing it manually through the CLI. I know of
    the program. It's somewhat modified in KDE4. A lot of the configuration
    modules in that program are missing. All it appears to do now is control
    the eye-candy.

    Considering all it does is rename files it shouldn't cause any problems
    with the GUI (not that there is access to it through the GUI with this
    version).

    Later
    Mike


  7. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    > Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > >> ================
    > >> sudo mv S10acpid K10acpid
    > >> sudo mv S20apmd K20apmd
    > >> sudo mv S25bluetooth K25bluetooth
    > >> sudo mv S99acpi-support K99acpi-support
    > >> =================

    > >
    > > Probably you could uninstall these, too.


    > Through the "add remove programs" or apt-get?


    Yes, either one. E.g., only desktop metapackages depend from
    package acpi-support.

    > > I have disabled avahi-daemon and dbus (not sure if I might need the
    > > latter, though).


    > I though avahi was related to USB.


    I thought it was more a network thing:
    Avahi is a fully LGPL framework for Multicast DNS Service Discovery.
    It allows programs to publish and discover services and hosts
    running on a local network with no specific configuration. For
    example you can plug into a network and instantly find printers to
    print to, files to look at and people to talk to.

    > dbus (I think) is necessary for some
    > programs to run. I thought it was something like hal.


    IIRC dbus was only installed when I installed audacious. And it
    remained active after closing audacious...

    > > Doesn't the README say you should do
    > > sudo mv S10acpid K90acpid
    > > sudo mv K20apmd K80acpid


    > Second line should read K80apmd?


    Correct.

    > > Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?
    > >


    > /etc/rc?.d ? = [2345]


    Are [345] used at any time?

    --
    Niklaus

  8. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 09:55:52 GMT, The Wizard of Oz wrote:

    > I though avahi was related to USB. dbus


    It is a networking thingy.

    http://groups.google.com/group/comp....e06b4fb2eba638

    I never bother removing it, I just disable the service from running.


  9. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    >> Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:


    I'm going to save the message.

    >>> Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?
    >>>

    >
    >> /etc/rc?.d ? = [2345]

    >
    > Are [345] used at any time?


    I don't know for sure. I think 5 (at least under FC) is the run level
    for the GUI. Also 3 is the run level for text mode. I think 3 may be
    used as a transition for 5 in Ubuntu.

    Later
    Mike

  10. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 16:09:11 +0000, The Wizard of Oz wrote:

    > Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    >> The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    >>> Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:

    >
    > I'm going to save the message.
    >
    >>>> Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> /etc/rc?.d ? = [2345]

    >>
    >> Are [345] used at any time?

    >
    > I don't know for sure. I think 5 (at least under FC) is the run

    level
    > for the GUI. Also 3 is the run level for text mode. I think 3 may be
    > used as a transition for 5 in Ubuntu.
    >
    > Later
    > Mike


    0 - off
    1 - single user mode
    2 - single user with network (if you are ssh'ing or running a terminal
    and enter 'runlevel' or 'who -r' you'll see '2')
    3 - multi-user boot in text mode
    4 - not defined
    5 - multi-user in 'x' win mode
    6 - shutdown and reboot



    --
    Dog walks down the road. Gust of wind. Dog inside out.
    I've replaced my 'old joke' signature because a better man than me told
    me to ;-)

  11. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    On 12 Jul 2008 17:20:57 GMT,
    A J Hawke wrote:
    > On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 16:09:11 +0000, The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    >
    > > Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > >> The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    > >>> Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:

    > >
    > > I'm going to save the message.
    > >
    > >>>> Which are the necessary rc?.d directories?
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>> /etc/rc?.d ? = [2345]
    > >>
    > >> Are [345] used at any time?

    > >
    > > I don't know for sure. I think 5 (at least under FC) is the run

    > level
    > > for the GUI. Also 3 is the run level for text mode. I think 3 may be
    > > used as a transition for 5 in Ubuntu.
    > >
    > > Later
    > > Mike

    >
    > 0 - off
    > 1 - single user mode
    > 2 - single user with network (if you are ssh'ing or running a terminal
    > and enter 'runlevel' or 'who -r' you'll see '2')
    > 3 - multi-user boot in text mode
    > 4 - not defined
    > 5 - multi-user in 'x' win mode
    > 6 - shutdown and reboot


    Pretty sensible usage which I know is used by RH based distros. It is
    well documented, and is ignored by Debian based distros.

    I believe runlevel 6 may work as expected. Runlevel 1 may be useful,
    as there's probably a hack for maintenance (root is unable to log in
    by default.) Runlevel 2 is the default in Debian based distros and
    will usually start [gkwx]dm if available.

    I used to change the services running on the runlevels to match RH
    when I started using Debian. I got lazy on that front a while ago and
    stopped. You can edit any to do what you like, but don't mess with S,
    0, 1 or 6 unless you know what you are doing.

    Keep in mind that the install/remove scripts in apps may affect the
    runlevels, and probably treat 2, 3, 4, 5 equally.

    You used to set the initial runlevel in /etc/inittab, which was very
    well documented, and I'm sure examples can be found.

    Ubuntu uses upstart, a review of /etc/event.d/rc-default indicates it
    will still honor the initdefault in /etc/inittab if found, otherwise
    uses a default of runlevel 2.

    It looks like 3, 4 and 5 are generally ignored, though I don't know if
    removing them would break any install scripts or not.

    The following man pages may be useful: init telinit runlevel
    update-rc.d inittab.

    man inittab will probably not be available unless you have sysvinit
    installed, but should be easily found with a search engine.

    Michael C.
    --
    mjchappell@verizon.net http://mcsuper5.freeshell.org/

    A pessimist always wins.
    He is either wrong (which is good), or he has the satisfaction
    of being right.

  12. Re: What can be disabled in /etc/rc?.d?

    Michael C. wrote:
    > On 12 Jul 2008 17:20:57 GMT,
    > A J Hawke wrote:
    > > On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 16:09:11 +0000, The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    > > > Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > > >> The Wizard of Oz wrote:
    > > >>> Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > > >
    > > >>> /etc/rc?.d ? = [2345]
    > > >>
    > > >> Are [345] used at any time?

    > >
    > > 0 - off
    > > 1 - single user mode
    > > 2 - single user with network (if you are ssh'ing or running a terminal
    > > (...)


    > Pretty sensible usage which I know is used by RH based distros. It is
    > well documented, and is ignored by Debian based distros.


    > I believe runlevel 6 may work as expected. Runlevel 1 may be useful,
    > as there's probably a hack for maintenance (root is unable to log in
    > by default.) Runlevel 2 is the default in Debian based distros and
    > will usually start [gkwx]dm if available.


    > I used to change the services running on the runlevels to match RH
    > when I started using Debian. I got lazy on that front a while ago and
    > stopped. You can edit any to do what you like, but don't mess with S,
    > 0, 1 or 6 unless you know what you are doing.


    > Keep in mind that the install/remove scripts in apps may affect the
    > runlevels, and probably treat 2, 3, 4, 5 equally.


    > You used to set the initial runlevel in /etc/inittab, which was very
    > well documented, and I'm sure examples can be found.


    > Ubuntu uses upstart, a review of /etc/event.d/rc-default indicates it
    > will still honor the initdefault in /etc/inittab if found, otherwise
    > uses a default of runlevel 2.


    > It looks like 3, 4 and 5 are generally ignored, though I don't know if
    > removing them would break any install scripts or not.


    > The following man pages may be useful: init telinit runlevel
    > update-rc.d inittab.


    > man inittab will probably not be available unless you have sysvinit
    > installed, but should be easily found with a search engine.


    Thanks for the clarification.

    Niklaus

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