At what point does a program become a virus? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on At what point does a program become a virus? - Ubuntu ; It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note. After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete: Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission....

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Thread: At what point does a program become a virus?

  1. At what point does a program become a virus?

    It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.

    After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and
    deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete:
    Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission.



  2. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

    Todd wrote:
    > It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.
    >
    > After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and
    > deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete:
    > Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission.


    The real flash6.ocx is installed by a security update described here

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sec.../ms06-069.mspx
    Microsoft Security Bulletin MS06-069 -- Vulnerabilities in Macromedia
    Flash Player from Adobe Could Allow Remote Code Execution (923789) -
    Published: November 14, 2006 - Updated: May 13, 2008

    File permission configuration doesn't make an executable malware.

    --
    Mike Easter


  3. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

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    Hash: RIPEMD160

    Todd wrote:
    >
    >
    > It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.
    >
    > After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and
    > deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete:
    > Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission.


    Not being able to delete something doesn't make that something a virus,
    it just means you don't have permission to delete it. Viruses have to be
    executable code of some sort, and they have to try and replicate.

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  4. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

    Todd wrote:
    > It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.


    > After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and
    > deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete:
    > Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission.


    Try reformatting.

    --
    Niklaus

  5. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

    On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 13:30:58 -0700, Todd wrote:

    > It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.
    >
    > After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and deleted
    > the previous Windows install. One file would not delete: Flash6.ocx. I
    > didn't have permission.


    Delete the partition. Create new partition. Format.



  6. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

    On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 13:30:58 -0700, Todd wrote:

    > It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.
    >
    > After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and
    > deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete:
    > Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission.


    As well as the drastic measures suggested here:

    File -> Properties -> Security -> Advanced -> Owner -> Take Ownership

    The original owner was probably the system or perhaps a service
    (IUSR_MACHINE or something) but might now show as a simple GUID as the
    original Windows install and security context is gone.

    --
    A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother.



  7. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

    On Mon, 07 Jul 2008 08:26:47 +0100, Trevor Best wrote:

    > On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 13:30:58 -0700, Todd wrote:
    >
    >> It's not Linux related, but it's an interesting thing to note.
    >>
    >> After reinstalling Windows, I plugged in the old boot drive, and
    >> deleted the previous Windows install. One file would not delete:
    >> Flash6.ocx. I didn't have permission.

    >
    > As well as the drastic measures suggested here:
    >
    > File -> Properties -> Security -> Advanced -> Owner -> Take Ownership
    >
    > The original owner was probably the system or perhaps a service
    > (IUSR_MACHINE or something) but might now show as a simple GUID as the
    > original Windows install and security context is gone.


    You are probably aware, but delete and format do not wipe the files from
    a drive. A lot of detritus is left, as you found here.

    One idea is to use a free set of utilities--the Universal Boot CD--http://
    www.ultimatebootcd.com/

    It is about a 100mb download. In the Hard Disk Tools section are
    utilities to wipe a drive, a partition, a directory, or a file.

    I recommend a wipe (about a 10 minute operation) to overwrite 0's on the
    partition before a reinstall. Then nothing is there to futz up your
    reinstall.

    cheers

  8. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?

    On Mon, 07 Jul 2008 14:24:50 +0000, Coffeeman wrote:

    > You are probably aware, but delete and format do not wipe the files from
    > a drive. A lot of detritus is left, as you found here.
    >
    > One idea is to use a free set of utilities--the Universal Boot CD--http://
    > www.ultimatebootcd.com/
    >
    > It is about a 100mb download. In the Hard Disk Tools section are
    > utilities to wipe a drive, a partition, a directory, or a file.
    >
    > I recommend a wipe (about a 10 minute operation) to overwrite 0's on the
    > partition before a reinstall. Then nothing is there to futz up your
    > reinstall.


    That might help in foiling forensic scientists but I don't think it's
    necessary to just re-use the disk space again.

    --
    A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother.



  9. Re: At what point does a program become a virus?


    >>
    >> I recommend a wipe (about a 10 minute operation) to overwrite 0's on
    >> the partition before a reinstall. Then nothing is there to futz up
    >> your reinstall.

    >
    > That might help in foiling forensic scientists but I don't think it's
    > necessary to just re-use the disk space again.


    I'm not foiling around :-)

    I have just found that a wipe or a manufacturer's low level format from
    the UBCD I mentioned circumvents potential problems during an install.
    More than once I have run across this problem, even during a Ubuntu-
    Ubuntu overwrite.

    Additionally, if (heaven forbid) installing windows on a Linux formatted
    disk, Windows can't deal with the partitioning.

    You're right. Not necessary. But what's 10 minutes vs. a failed install
    such as the OP complained of. I like having that UBCD in my tool kit.

    Cheers,


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