@!#$%! backup - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on @!#$%! backup - Ubuntu ; Well, I decided I'd been living on luck long enough and did a backup today. What a mess! First I clicked on Archive Manager. Found out I had to enter one directory ("folder") at a time. Then of course even ...

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  1. @!#$%! backup

    Well, I decided I'd been living on luck long enough and did a backup
    today. What a mess!

    First I clicked on Archive Manager. Found out I had to enter one
    directory ("folder") at a time. Then of course even that one folder
    didn't work because I didn't have permission for some of the files in /etc.

    OK, no problem, I'll log out and back in as root. Oops! Ubuntu won't
    let me do that from an X window. OK, I'll do it from the command line.
    Except ... what the heck is the executable name for the program. By
    running AM and looking at ps or top output I found the name was
    "file_roller". OK, sudo file_roller. For each directory I entered it
    unpacked and repacked the archive! Sheeesh! I give up.

    So I got out my Ubuntu books, both of which suggested something called
    "Simple Backup". Turns out there's two. The one named "sbackup", which
    appears to be the one in the books, can't be downloaded. The package
    manager gives a 404 error. The other one "simplebackup" is a
    rudimentary script which again has permission problems. Back to the
    command line.

    OK, by now I'm declaring backup to be a royal PITA. So, having been a
    Unix system guru before I retired, I resorted to the old standbys, tar
    and gzip. If I tarred with the -z option, it blew up with "delayed
    error message" or some such.

    Steam is now coming out of my ears. Finally I did the tar and then fed
    the completed tar file into gzip. Success at last!!

    Why do we have all these graphic interfaces and software that tries to
    protect us from ourselves? I could have saved several hours if I'd just
    gone to tar in the first place.

    Much more of this and I'm going back to slack :-).

  2. Re: @!#$%! backup

    Larry Blanchard wrote:

    > Well, I decided I'd been living on luck long enough and did a backup
    > today. What a mess!


    > Why do we have all these graphic interfaces and software that tries to
    > protect us from ourselves? I could have saved several hours if I'd
    > just gone to tar in the first place.
    >
    > Much more of this and I'm going back to slack :-).


    Amanda: No graphics interface, and it's working very nicely and reliable
    indeed.
    http://packages.ubuntu.com/hardy/amanda-server

    GŁnther

  3. Re: @!#$%! backup

    Larry Blanchard wrote:
    > Much more of this and I'm going back to slack :-).


    What the hell difference could it possibly make if you're on
    slack/ubuntu/fedora, etc? The tools are *all* the same.

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  4. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Tue, 01 Jul 2008 08:22:04 +0000, johnny bobby bee wrote:

    > Larry Blanchard wrote:
    >> Much more of this and I'm going back to slack :-).

    >
    > What the hell difference could it possibly make if you're on
    > slack/ubuntu/fedora, etc? The tools are *all* the same.


    That crossed my mind too, but I wondered if I had missed something.


    --
    begin broken-news-reader.exe

  5. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Tuesday 01 Jul 2008 05:12 Larry Blanchard licked a pencil and jotted:

    snip

    >
    > OK, by now I'm declaring backup to be a royal PITA. So, having been a
    > Unix system guru before I retired, I resorted to the old standbys, tar
    > and gzip. If I tarred with the -z option, it blew up with "delayed
    > error message" or some such.
    >
    > Steam is now coming out of my ears. Finally I did the tar and then fed
    > the completed tar file into gzip. Success at last!!
    >
    > Why do we have all these graphic interfaces and software that tries to
    > protect us from ourselves? I could have saved several hours if I'd just
    > gone to tar in the first place.
    >

    snip

    As a very much non linux guru, I have to say that I find rsync to be an
    absolutely brilliant tool for backing up my /home partition and /etc
    directory.

    Just need to nail the issue of getting the script to run properly from cron
    as root (I have still not read up properly on crontabs as root, but that's
    my fault) only takes a couple of minutes to run the script manually until
    then though.

    David

    --
    Knowledge is of two kinds: we know a subject ourselves, or we know where we
    can find information upon it. (Samuel Johnson)
    Only the mediocre are always at their best. (Jean Giraudoux)
    (Reply address genuine - Checked occasionally)

  6. Re: @!#$%! backup

    A J Hawke wrote:
    > On Tue, 01 Jul 2008 08:22:04 +0000, johnny bobby bee wrote:
    >
    >> Larry Blanchard wrote:
    >>> Much more of this and I'm going back to slack :-).


    >> What the hell difference could it possibly make if you're on
    >> slack/ubuntu/fedora, etc? The tools are *all* the same.

    >
    > That crossed my mind too, but I wondered if I had missed something.
    >


    My point is that when I see something called "Archive Manager" with a
    nice graphics interface, I have the (possibly unrealistic) expectation
    that it will be useful :-).

    And when the books suggest another backup program that it will be
    available. And yes, I did google for "simple backup" after the package
    manager failed to find it. Lots of references, but nowhere to download it.

    And not being able to log on as root without going to the command line
    interface is irritating, as is having to find an executable whose name
    differs from what is on the menu.

    I will admit that the graphics interface to setting up CUPS did make the
    job simple. And burning the backup to CD via the file browser was
    somewhat useful, even if I had to open another window so I could drag
    and drop.

    So it's a mixed bag. But yesterday was quite frustrating and I had to
    vent somewhere - this group seemed appropriate :-).

    I'll go back to lurking now and meditating on my slowly increasing
    senility :-).


  7. Re: @!#$%! backup

    Larry Blanchard wrote in
    news:19udnZy2VriwP_fVnZ2dnUVZ_qzinZ2d@pghconnect.c om:

    > And when the books suggest another backup program that it will be
    > available. And yes, I did google for "simple backup" after the
    > package manager failed to find it. Lots of references, but nowhere to
    > download it.


    There's an Ubuntu package here...

    http://linuxappfinder.com/package/sbackup

    You can browse thru that site and probably find several other useful
    tools/programs.

  8. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On 2008-07-01, Baldylocks-Ubuntu wrote:
    > On Tuesday 01 Jul 2008 05:12 Larry Blanchard licked a pencil and jotted:
    >
    > snip
    >
    >>
    >> OK, by now I'm declaring backup to be a royal PITA. So, having been a
    >> Unix system guru before I retired, I resorted to the old standbys, tar
    >> and gzip. If I tarred with the -z option, it blew up with "delayed
    >> error message" or some such.
    >>
    >> Steam is now coming out of my ears. Finally I did the tar and then fed
    >> the completed tar file into gzip. Success at last!!
    >>
    >> Why do we have all these graphic interfaces and software that tries to
    >> protect us from ourselves? I could have saved several hours if I'd just
    >> gone to tar in the first place.
    >>

    > snip
    >
    > As a very much non linux guru, I have to say that I find rsync to be an
    > absolutely brilliant tool for backing up my /home partition and /etc
    > directory.
    >
    > Just need to nail the issue of getting the script to run properly from cron
    > as root (I have still not read up properly on crontabs as root, but that's
    > my fault) only takes a couple of minutes to run the script manually until
    > then though.


    It's really pretty simple once you have the config file set up
    right...

    Here are my crontab entries:
    10 */6 * * * rsnapshot hourly
    0 0 * * * rsnapshot daily
    1 0 * * 0 rsnapshot weekly
    2 0 1 * * rsnapshot monthly

    So, it runs the "hourly" every 6 hours at 10 past the hour...
    The "daily" runs every day at midnight...
    The weekly goes on Sunday at 12:01 AM
    The Monthly goes on the 1st of each month at 1:02 AM.

    Monthly, weekly and daily are just a simple move, so they only take a
    second or so.

    Fiddle with it to get what works best for you...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  9. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Wednesday 02 Jul 2008 05:39 Joe licked a pencil and jotted:

    snip
    >
    > It's really pretty simple once you have the config file set up
    > right...
    >
    > Here are my crontab entries:
    > 10 */6 * * * rsnapshot hourly
    > 0 0 * * * rsnapshot daily
    > 1 0 * * 0 rsnapshot weekly
    > 2 0 1 * * rsnapshot monthly
    >
    > So, it runs the "hourly" every 6 hours at 10 past the hour...
    > The "daily" runs every day at midnight...
    > The weekly goes on Sunday at 12:01 AM
    > The Monthly goes on the 1st of each month at 1:02 AM.
    >
    > Monthly, weekly and daily are just a simple move, so they only take a
    > second or so.
    >
    > Fiddle with it to get what works best for you...
    >
    >


    Ah, getting scripts or tasks to run on a schedule is not the problem, it's
    the ones that need to run as root that seem to cause me grief.

    I just have a bit of reading to do to get how it all fits

    David
    --
    Knowledge is of two kinds: we know a subject ourselves, or we know where we
    can find information upon it. (Samuel Johnson)
    Only the mediocre are always at their best. (Jean Giraudoux)
    (Reply address genuine - Checked occasionally)

  10. Re: @!#$%! backup

    Larry Blanchard wrote:
    > My point is that when I see something called "Archive Manager" with a
    > nice graphics interface, I have the (possibly unrealistic) expectation
    > that it will be useful :-).


    It is useful, like any other compression utility or graphical interface
    to archiving utilities such as tar and zip, is useful.

    > And not being able to log on as root without going to the command line
    > interface is irritating


    Jesus, not another 'wanting to log on as root' folks. Just be glad that
    you can't.

    > I'll go back to lurking now and meditating on my slowly increasing
    > senility :-).


    Just ask appropriate questions. Stop getting irritated. There are many
    backup utilities. Rsync (command line) is one of the best.

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  11. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 07:37:32 +0000, johnny bobby bee wrote:

    > Larry Blanchard wrote:
    >> My point is that when I see something called "Archive Manager" with a
    >> nice graphics interface, I have the (possibly unrealistic) expectation
    >> that it will be useful :-).

    >
    > It is useful, like any other compression utility or graphical interface
    > to archiving utilities such as tar and zip, is useful.
    >
    >> And not being able to log on as root without going to the command line
    >> interface is irritating

    >
    > Jesus, not another 'wanting to log on as root' folks. Just be glad that
    > you can't.
    >
    >> I'll go back to lurking now and meditating on my slowly increasing
    >> senility :-).

    >
    > Just ask appropriate questions. Stop getting irritated. There are many
    > backup utilities. Rsync (command line) is one of the best.


    OK, having read this and having used Acronis to image the machine weekly,
    I think it may be time for me to expand my knowledge now that I am
    spending more time using a Linux box for everything I do.

    Say I wanted to back up my Linux machine so I could take a empty hard
    drive and then 'restore' to that. I don't want to have to start
    installing OS's or apps. I don't care how bid the backup is. How would I
    do this?

    I am thinking along the lines of;
    Backup all files to a .tar file (to keep it contained)

    To restore:
    Format a HDD for the correct FS type with a swap partition
    Lauch a Live CD
    Copy the .tar into the root directory and expand it

    Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?

    --
    begin broken-news-reader.exe

  12. Re: @!#$%! backup

    > As a very much non linux guru, I have to say that I find rsync to be an
    > absolutely brilliant tool for backing up my /home partition and /etc
    > directory.
    >
    > Just need to nail the issue of getting the script to run properly from cron
    > as root (I have still not read up properly on crontabs as root, but that's
    > my fault) only takes a couple of minutes to run the script manually until
    > then though.
    >
    > David
    >


    You might want to look at dirvish, I use that mor many months now and it
    saves me the trouble to write my own rsync scripts.

  13. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On 2008-07-02, Baldylocks-Ubuntu wrote:
    > On Wednesday 02 Jul 2008 05:39 Joe licked a pencil and jotted:
    >
    > snip
    >>
    >> It's really pretty simple once you have the config file set up
    >> right...
    >>
    >> Here are my crontab entries:
    >> 10 */6 * * * rsnapshot hourly
    >> 0 0 * * * rsnapshot daily
    >> 1 0 * * 0 rsnapshot weekly
    >> 2 0 1 * * rsnapshot monthly
    >>
    >> So, it runs the "hourly" every 6 hours at 10 past the hour...
    >> The "daily" runs every day at midnight...
    >> The weekly goes on Sunday at 12:01 AM
    >> The Monthly goes on the 1st of each month at 1:02 AM.
    >>
    >> Monthly, weekly and daily are just a simple move, so they only take a
    >> second or so.
    >>
    >> Fiddle with it to get what works best for you...
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Ah, getting scripts or tasks to run on a schedule is not the problem, it's
    > the ones that need to run as root that seem to cause me grief.
    >
    > I just have a bit of reading to do to get how it all fits


    That's what I am trying to explain, though. rsnapshot requires no
    scripts. You set up the config file, and from there you just add the
    proper entries to root's crontab.

    Take a look at the /etc/rsnapshot.conf file. Everything you need is
    in there.


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  14. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On 2008-07-02, A J Hawke wrote:
    > On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 07:37:32 +0000, johnny bobby bee wrote:
    >
    >> Larry Blanchard wrote:
    >>> My point is that when I see something called "Archive Manager" with a
    >>> nice graphics interface, I have the (possibly unrealistic) expectation
    >>> that it will be useful :-).

    >>
    >> It is useful, like any other compression utility or graphical interface
    >> to archiving utilities such as tar and zip, is useful.
    >>
    >>> And not being able to log on as root without going to the command line
    >>> interface is irritating

    >>
    >> Jesus, not another 'wanting to log on as root' folks. Just be glad that
    >> you can't.
    >>
    >>> I'll go back to lurking now and meditating on my slowly increasing
    >>> senility :-).

    >>
    >> Just ask appropriate questions. Stop getting irritated. There are many
    >> backup utilities. Rsync (command line) is one of the best.

    >
    > OK, having read this and having used Acronis to image the machine weekly,
    > I think it may be time for me to expand my knowledge now that I am
    > spending more time using a Linux box for everything I do.
    >
    > Say I wanted to back up my Linux machine so I could take a empty hard
    > drive and then 'restore' to that. I don't want to have to start
    > installing OS's or apps. I don't care how bid the backup is. How would I
    > do this?
    >
    > I am thinking along the lines of;
    > Backup all files to a .tar file (to keep it contained)
    >
    > To restore:
    > Format a HDD for the correct FS type with a swap partition
    > Lauch a Live CD
    > Copy the .tar into the root directory and expand it
    >
    > Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?
    >


    That's the windows way. In *nix, a working "mirror" isn't necessary.
    Installing the OS takes minutes, and installing the apps is a matter
    of maintaining an automated list of the currently installed packages
    and using that to automatically install them. From there, all you
    need in a backup is the config files and data.

    I have wiped out my hard drive. A restore took about an hour, and
    rather than being an "image", it was a full clean install and restore
    of data (/home) and configs.

    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  15. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 11:43:12 -0500, Joe wrote:

    > On 2008-07-02, A J Hawke wrote:
    >> On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 07:37:32 +0000, johnny bobby bee wrote:
    >>
    >>> Larry Blanchard wrote:
    >>>> My point is that when I see something called "Archive Manager" with a
    >>>> nice graphics interface, I have the (possibly unrealistic)
    >>>> expectation that it will be useful :-).
    >>>
    >>> It is useful, like any other compression utility or graphical
    >>> interface to archiving utilities such as tar and zip, is useful.
    >>>
    >>>> And not being able to log on as root without going to the command
    >>>> line interface is irritating
    >>>
    >>> Jesus, not another 'wanting to log on as root' folks. Just be glad
    >>> that you can't.
    >>>
    >>>> I'll go back to lurking now and meditating on my slowly increasing
    >>>> senility :-).
    >>>
    >>> Just ask appropriate questions. Stop getting irritated. There are many
    >>> backup utilities. Rsync (command line) is one of the best.

    >>
    >> OK, having read this and having used Acronis to image the machine
    >> weekly, I think it may be time for me to expand my knowledge now that I
    >> am spending more time using a Linux box for everything I do.
    >>
    >> Say I wanted to back up my Linux machine so I could take a empty hard
    >> drive and then 'restore' to that. I don't want to have to start
    >> installing OS's or apps. I don't care how bid the backup is. How would
    >> I do this?
    >>
    >> I am thinking along the lines of;
    >> Backup all files to a .tar file (to keep it contained)
    >>
    >> To restore:
    >> Format a HDD for the correct FS type with a swap partition Lauch a Live
    >> CD
    >> Copy the .tar into the root directory and expand it
    >>
    >> Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?
    >>
    >>

    > That's the windows way. In *nix, a working "mirror" isn't necessary.
    > Installing the OS takes minutes, and installing the apps is a matter of
    > maintaining an automated list of the currently installed packages and
    > using that to automatically install them. From there, all you need in a
    > backup is the config files and data.
    >
    > I have wiped out my hard drive. A restore took about an hour, and
    > rather than being an "image", it was a full clean install and restore of
    > data (/home) and configs.


    We have done that conversation about reinstalling the OS. That is *NOT*
    what I am asking. I don't want to **** around like that.

    Anybody else got an answer?

    --
    begin broken-news-reader.exe

  16. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On 02 Jul 2008 10:27:05 GMT,
    A J Hawke wrote:

    > Say I wanted to back up my Linux machine so I could take a empty hard
    > drive and then 'restore' to that. I don't want to have to start
    > installing OS's or apps. I don't care how bid the backup is. How would I
    > do this?
    >
    > I am thinking along the lines of;
    > Backup all files to a .tar file (to keep it contained)
    >
    > To restore:
    > Format a HDD for the correct FS type with a swap partition
    > Lauch a Live CD
    > Copy the .tar into the root directory and expand it
    >
    > Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?


    You may still have to boot from a rescue disk and install grub or lilo
    but the concept is sound.

    Michael C.
    --
    mjchappell@verizon.net http://mcsuper5.freeshell.org/

    Silence is the one great art of conversation.

  17. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 18:17:07 +0000, Michael C. wrote:

    > On 02 Jul 2008 10:27:05 GMT,
    > A J Hawke wrote:
    >
    >> Say I wanted to back up my Linux machine so I could take a empty hard
    >> drive and then 'restore' to that. I don't want to have to start
    >> installing OS's or apps. I don't care how bid the backup is. How would
    >> I do this?
    >>
    >> I am thinking along the lines of;
    >> Backup all files to a .tar file (to keep it contained)
    >>
    >> To restore:
    >> Format a HDD for the correct FS type with a swap partition Lauch a
    >> Live CD
    >> Copy the .tar into the root directory and expand it
    >>
    >> Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?

    >
    > You may still have to boot from a rescue disk and install grub or lilo
    > but the concept is sound.
    >
    > Michael C.


    Thank you Michael. I will give it a go in the next couple of days.


    --
    begin broken-news-reader.exe

  18. Re: @!#$%! backup

    On Wednesday 02 Jul 2008 17:40 Joe licked a pencil and jotted:

    snip
    >>
    >> Ah, getting scripts or tasks to run on a schedule is not the problem,
    >> it's the ones that need to run as root that seem to cause me grief.
    >>
    >> I just have a bit of reading to do to get how it all fits

    >
    > That's what I am trying to explain, though. rsnapshot requires no
    > scripts. You set up the config file, and from there you just add the
    > proper entries to root's crontab.
    >
    > Take a look at the /etc/rsnapshot.conf file. Everything you need is
    > in there.
    >
    >


    Ah right, sorry. Speed reading half asleep before going to work. Will have a
    look shortly.

    Just one thing though, the "script" I have for rsync is not really a script
    as such, just two lines, rsync and its options twice. I found that I got a
    lot of failures if I didn't run as root.

    David
    --
    Knowledge is of two kinds: we know a subject ourselves, or we know where we
    can find information upon it. (Samuel Johnson)
    Only the mediocre are always at their best. (Jean Giraudoux)
    (Reply address genuine - Checked occasionally)

  19. Re: @!#$%! backup

    In Wed, 02 Jul 2008 06:27:05, A J Hawke wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:
    > On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 07:37:32 +0000, johnny bobby bee wrote:
    >
    >> Larry Blanchard wrote:
    >>> My point is that when I see something called "Archive Manager" with a
    >>> nice graphics interface, I have the (possibly unrealistic) expectation
    >>> that it will be useful :-).

    >>
    >> It is useful, like any other compression utility or graphical interface
    >> to archiving utilities such as tar and zip, is useful.
    >>
    >>> And not being able to log on as root without going to the command line
    >>> interface is irritating

    >>
    >> Jesus, not another 'wanting to log on as root' folks. Just be glad that
    >> you can't.
    >>
    >>> I'll go back to lurking now and meditating on my slowly increasing
    >>> senility :-).

    >>
    >> Just ask appropriate questions. Stop getting irritated. There are many
    >> backup utilities. Rsync (command line) is one of the best.

    >
    > OK, having read this and having used Acronis to image the machine weekly,
    > I think it may be time for me to expand my knowledge now that I am
    > spending more time using a Linux box for everything I do.
    >
    > Say I wanted to back up my Linux machine so I could take a empty hard
    > drive and then 'restore' to that. I don't want to have to start
    > installing OS's or apps. I don't care how bid the backup is. How would I
    > do this?
    >
    > I am thinking along the lines of;
    > Backup all files to a .tar file (to keep it contained)
    >
    > To restore:
    > Format a HDD for the correct FS type with a swap partition
    > Lauch a Live CD
    > Copy the .tar into the root directory and expand it
    >
    > Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?
    >


    Wouldn't dd be a better tool to do that? Theoretically,
    you can even backup your partition table using dd...

    Saludos,
    AHG
    --
    A pizza of radius z and thickness a has a volume of:

    pi z z a
    16:10:07 up 7:33, 6 users, load average: 0.20, 0.67, 0.76

  20. Re: @!#$%! backup

    A J Hawke wrote:
    > Would this make a working 'mirror' of the machine?


    You can also try these:

    http://www.clonezilla.org/
    http://gpartedclonz.tuxfamily.org/index.php
    http://www.partimage.org/Main_Page

    They work like Norton Ghost.

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

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