modifying system file? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on modifying system file? - Ubuntu ; Hobbes wrote: > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote: >> Hobbes wrote: >>>>> -- >>>>> -bts >>>>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows >>> >>> And yet...your driving it ! >> >> With your infinite experience with Linux/Ubuntu, I'd be sure that ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 45

Thread: modifying system file?

  1. Re: modifying system file?

    Hobbes wrote:
    > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >> Hobbes wrote:
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> -bts
    >>>>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
    >>>
    >>> And yet...your driving it !

    >>
    >> With your infinite experience with Linux/Ubuntu, I'd be sure that you
    >> have heard of Wine. 40tude Dialog is an excellent newsreader.
    >>
    >> Check this header.
    >>

    >
    > Wow !
    > a Linux user that likes Outlook Express...
    > who'd of thunk it ?



    When an ignorant n00b walks into a strange bar and starts badmouthing
    the regulars, their teeth would be thunked right out of their head in a
    short time.

    Of course this newsgroup doesn't sell beverages, alcoholic or otherwise.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  2. Re: modifying system file?

    Joe wrote:

    > Actually, switch user. It defaults to root if nothing else is
    > specified, but will allow you to switch to any user on the system,
    > which is quite useful when users call saying that they can't access
    > whatever file... You can su joe - , and have access to everything
    > just like joe sees it.
    >
    > I know that man says super user these days, but it used to be reported
    > as switch user... ;-)
    >



    Your man isn't as good as my man! (That doesn't sound right coming from
    a John to a Joe.) ;-)

    su(1) -- su - change user ID or become super-user

    sudo(8) -- sudo, sudoedit - execute a command as another user


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  3. Re: modifying system file?

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > Hobbes wrote:
    >> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>> Hobbes wrote:
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> -bts
    >>>>>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
    >>>>
    >>>> And yet...your driving it !
    >>>
    >>> With your infinite experience with Linux/Ubuntu, I'd be sure that you
    >>> have heard of Wine. 40tude Dialog is an excellent newsreader.
    >>>
    >>> Check this header.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Wow !
    >> a Linux user that likes Outlook Express...
    >> who'd of thunk it ?

    >
    >
    > When an ignorant n00b walks into a strange bar and starts badmouthing
    > the regulars, their teeth would be thunked right out of their head in a
    > short time.
    >
    > Of course this newsgroup doesn't sell beverages, alcoholic or otherwise.
    >
    >


    The bleating of an old goat.

    Oh...and this ain't a bar.

    Senility makes for Serenity, no ?

    Ahh...you must be happy.

  4. Re: modifying system file?

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 17:12:25 -0400, Hobbes wrote:

    >>> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Windows Mail 6.0.6001.18000


    >> Bugger off, Win-droid. Vista, no less! LOL. Wanker.


    > Windroid ?
    > you make that word up ?


    As a matter of fact, I did. Bugger off.


    --
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as he turned the launch key.


  5. Re: modifying system file?

    On 2008-06-29, John F. Morse wrote:
    > Joe wrote:
    >
    >> Actually, switch user. It defaults to root if nothing else is
    >> specified, but will allow you to switch to any user on the system,
    >> which is quite useful when users call saying that they can't access
    >> whatever file... You can su joe - , and have access to everything
    >> just like joe sees it.
    >>
    >> I know that man says super user these days, but it used to be reported
    >> as switch user... ;-)
    >>

    >
    >
    > Your man isn't as good as my man! (That doesn't sound right coming from
    > a John to a Joe.) ;-)
    >
    > su(1) -- su - change user ID or become super-user
    >
    > sudo(8) -- sudo, sudoedit - execute a command as another user
    >
    >


    Right, it doesn't say "switch user" as it should, but does put
    super-user right there in the line, which causes confusion, IMO...

    The only point I'd challenge for you is in your previous post you said
    it defaults to the currently logged in user, which is incorrect. su
    and sudo default to root. For instance:

    sudo gedit somefile

    Will edit the file as user root (so long as the logged in user is a
    sudoer). Just as:

    su -

    Will switch to user root...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  6. Re: modifying system file?

    Joe wrote:
    > On 2008-06-29, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >> Joe wrote:
    >>
    >>> Actually, switch user. It defaults to root if nothing else is
    >>> specified, but will allow you to switch to any user on the system,
    >>> which is quite useful when users call saying that they can't access
    >>> whatever file... You can su joe - , and have access to everything
    >>> just like joe sees it.
    >>>
    >>> I know that man says super user these days, but it used to be reported
    >>> as switch user... ;-)
    >>>

    >> Your man isn't as good as my man! (That doesn't sound right coming from
    >> a John to a Joe.) ;-)
    >>
    >> su(1) -- su - change user ID or become super-user
    >>
    >> sudo(8) -- sudo, sudoedit - execute a command as another user
    >>

    >
    > Right, it doesn't say "switch user" as it should, but does put
    > super-user right there in the line, which causes confusion, IMO...
    >



    "Opinion" noted. ;-)

    This possible confusion was the reason I posted the exact wording.


    > The only point I'd challenge for you is in your previous post you said
    > it defaults to the currently logged in user, which is incorrect. su
    > and sudo default to root. For instance:
    >



    What did I say in THIS post, quoted above?

    Hint: "It defaults to root if nothing else is specified."

    If you want to discuss a previous post, then reply to the previous post.
    I've slept since then. ;-)


    > sudo gedit somefile
    >
    > Will edit the file as user root (so long as the logged in user is a
    > sudoer).



    Explain:

    john@ubuntu6.06:/$ cd /root/share
    bash: cd: /root/share: Permission denied
    john@ubuntu6.06:/$ sudo cd /root/share
    sudo: cd: command not found
    john@ubuntu6.06:/$ su cd /root/share
    Unknown id: cd
    john@ubuntu6.06:/$ sudo su cd /root/share
    Unknown id: cd

    john@ubuntu6.06:/$ sudo su
    root@ubuntu6.06:/# cd /root/share
    root@ubuntu6.06:~/share#
    root@ubuntu6.06:~/share# whoami
    root
    root@ubuntu6.06:~/share# exit
    exit
    john@ubuntu6.06:/$


    > Just as:
    >
    > su -
    >
    > Will switch to user root...



    But adding the hyphen makes it not the default. ;-)

    The hyphen actually has nothing to do with to whom you switch, but
    signifies to set the environment to that user.

    The su command with no options won't work on most default Ubuntu
    installations where the sudo command is the preferred method to gain
    superuser privileges.

    I would appreciate it if you did not post how to defeat this. Never give
    a hand grenade to someone who is untrained. ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  7. Re: modifying system file?

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 18:00:43 -0500, John F. Morse wrote:

    > I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or so as
    > another FAQ. ;-)


    Will there be separate FAQs for 7.1 and 8.4?

    --
    A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother.



  8. Re: modifying system file?

    On 2008-06-30, John F. Morse wrote:
    > Joe wrote:
    >> On 2008-06-29, John F. Morse wrote:
    >>
    >>> Joe wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Actually, switch user. It defaults to root if nothing else is
    >>>> specified, but will allow you to switch to any user on the system,
    >>>> which is quite useful when users call saying that they can't access
    >>>> whatever file... You can su joe - , and have access to everything
    >>>> just like joe sees it.
    >>>>
    >>>> I know that man says super user these days, but it used to be reported
    >>>> as switch user... ;-)
    >>>>
    >>> Your man isn't as good as my man! (That doesn't sound right coming from
    >>> a John to a Joe.) ;-)
    >>>
    >>> su(1) -- su - change user ID or become super-user
    >>>
    >>> sudo(8) -- sudo, sudoedit - execute a command as another user
    >>>

    >>
    >> Right, it doesn't say "switch user" as it should, but does put
    >> super-user right there in the line, which causes confusion, IMO...
    >>

    >
    >
    > "Opinion" noted. ;-)
    >
    > This possible confusion was the reason I posted the exact wording.
    >
    >


    So, then, you clearly share the "opinion"... ;-)

    >> The only point I'd challenge for you is in your previous post you said
    >> it defaults to the currently logged in user, which is incorrect. su
    >> and sudo default to root. For instance:
    >>

    >
    >
    > What did I say in THIS post, quoted above?


    You didn't SAY anything in this post, simply quoted the man page. The
    other post was in the same thread, mere minutes before...

    >
    > Hint: "It defaults to root if nothing else is specified."
    >
    > If you want to discuss a previous post, then reply to the previous post.
    > I've slept since then. ;-)
    >
    >
    >> sudo gedit somefile
    >>
    >> Will edit the file as user root (so long as the logged in user is a
    >> sudoer).

    >
    >
    > Explain:
    >
    > john@ubuntu6.06:/$ cd /root/share
    > bash: cd: /root/share: Permission denied


    As it should be...

    > john@ubuntu6.06:/$ sudo cd /root/share
    > sudo: cd: command not found
    > john@ubuntu6.06:/$ su cd /root/share
    > Unknown id: cd


    su switches user, so you are trying to change to user cd?

    > john@ubuntu6.06:/$ sudo su cd /root/share
    > Unknown id: cd


    Same again...

    >
    > john@ubuntu6.06:/$ sudo su
    > root@ubuntu6.06:/# cd /root/share
    > root@ubuntu6.06:~/share#
    > root@ubuntu6.06:~/share# whoami
    > root
    > root@ubuntu6.06:~/share# exit
    > exit
    > john@ubuntu6.06:/$


    Right, you switched to user root, then executed whoami. That's what
    it should do...

    >
    >
    >> Just as:
    >>
    >> su -
    >>
    >> Will switch to user root...

    >
    >
    > But adding the hyphen makes it not the default. ;-)


    No, it doesn't. The hyphen just says use the full environment, which
    I always include by habit. Why switch to a user if you don't want
    that user's environment?

    >
    > The hyphen actually has nothing to do with to whom you switch, but
    > signifies to set the environment to that user.


    Right...

    >
    > The su command with no options won't work on most default Ubuntu
    > installations where the sudo command is the preferred method to gain
    > superuser privileges.


    That's incorrect. The su command will work, but it will not switch to
    user root, as the user is disabled. If you are logged in as john, and
    want to switch to user joe, su joe will work fine, so long as you have
    the password...

    >
    > I would appreciate it if you did not post how to defeat this. Never give
    > a hand grenade to someone who is untrained. ;-)


    While I kinda agree, I also think that like everything else in linux,
    the choice is there, and the users should become educated. I like
    sudo most of the time, but su is useful at times, as well... Sure
    saves a lot of typing when executing several commands...



    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  9. Re: modifying system file?

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 10:02:01 -0500,
    Alan Illeman wrote:

    > Is there a tutorial somewhere for commands? (I used to be a
    > DOS & C programmer years ago).


    Someone mentioned 'man'. Most of debian's derivitives have pretty
    sparse man pages. More complete info and some examples can often be
    found with 'info', which you are often referred to in the man pages.

    You can also check for README files, examples and so forth in
    /usr/share/doc// .

    Other good sources for info are:

    http://www.google.com/
    http://www.tldp.org/

    When reviewing sites for additional info pay attention to the date of
    the post as some info may be dated. Coming from a background in C,
    you may appreciate build-essential, glibc-doc and manpages-dev.

    $ sudo apt-get install build-essential glibc-doc manpages-dev

    HTH,

    Michael C.
    --
    mjchappell@verizon.net http://mcsuper5.freeshell.org/

    In selling, as in golf, the follow-through is important.

  10. Re: modifying system file?

    Trevor Best wrote:
    > On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 18:00:43 -0500, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or so as
    >> another FAQ. ;-)
    >>

    >
    > Will there be separate FAQs for 7.1 and 8.4?



    Just a neverending supply of addendums, like 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.7.1,
    8.7.2, .... ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  11. Re: modifying system file?

    John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > Moog wrote:
    >>> Is "sudo" supervisor-do ?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Super-user
    >>

    >
    >
    > Switch User DO {this-and-that}.
    >
    > Without an optional username (sudo -u someuser command), it defaults to
    > you, the logged-in user (whoami), as the user, who is normally in the
    > adm group, or has root privileges in the /etc/sudoers file.
    >
    > The same as su (Switch User), which is not "Super User."
    >
    > I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or so as
    > another FAQ. ;-)


    I was going by the official Ubuntu doc.

    My understanding was that su was switch user, sudo was super user, for
    the simple reason that it can only be used from the first installed
    account and no others.

    I know you can add further users to the sudoers group, but only from
    the first account (the super user).

    Maybe it's Ubuntu's fault for re-defining traditional linux terms!!

    Heh. It's definitely not me. ;-)

    --
    So I went to the dentist. He said "Say Aaah." I said "Why?" He said "My
    dog's died.'" ~ Tim Vine

  12. Re: modifying system file?

    Joe illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > On 2008-06-29, John F. Morse wrote:
    >> Joe wrote:
    >>
    >>> Actually, switch user. It defaults to root if nothing else is
    >>> specified, but will allow you to switch to any user on the system,
    >>> which is quite useful when users call saying that they can't access
    >>> whatever file... You can su joe - , and have access to everything
    >>> just like joe sees it.
    >>>
    >>> I know that man says super user these days, but it used to be reported
    >>> as switch user... ;-)
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Your man isn't as good as my man! (That doesn't sound right coming from
    >> a John to a Joe.) ;-)
    >>
    >> su(1) -- su - change user ID or become super-user
    >>
    >> sudo(8) -- sudo, sudoedit - execute a command as another user
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Right, it doesn't say "switch user" as it should, but does put
    > super-user right there in the line, which causes confusion, IMO...


    Blimey. I'm confused. ;-)


    --
    "Probably the toughest time in anyone's life is when you have to murder
    a loved one because they're the devil." ~ Emo Philips

  13. Re: modifying system file?

    On 2008-07-01, Moog wrote:
    > John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >> Moog wrote:
    >>>> Is "sudo" supervisor-do ?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Super-user
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Switch User DO {this-and-that}.
    >>
    >> Without an optional username (sudo -u someuser command), it defaults to
    >> you, the logged-in user (whoami), as the user, who is normally in the
    >> adm group, or has root privileges in the /etc/sudoers file.
    >>
    >> The same as su (Switch User), which is not "Super User."
    >>
    >> I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or so as
    >> another FAQ. ;-)

    >
    > I was going by the official Ubuntu doc.
    >
    > My understanding was that su was switch user, sudo was super user, for
    > the simple reason that it can only be used from the first installed
    > account and no others.


    That's simply because Ubuntu adds the first created user as a
    sudoer... Other distros don't do this...

    >
    > I know you can add further users to the sudoers group, but only from
    > the first account (the super user).


    Technically, only from root (you can use sudo to acheive this... ;-)

    >
    > Maybe it's Ubuntu's fault for re-defining traditional linux terms!!


    Indeed!

    >
    > Heh. It's definitely not me. ;-)
    >


    Doesn't mean I can't blame you... ;-)


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  14. Re: modifying system file?

    Joe illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > On 2008-07-01, Moog wrote:
    >> John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>> Moog wrote:
    >>>>> Is "sudo" supervisor-do ?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Super-user
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Switch User DO {this-and-that}.
    >>>
    >>> Without an optional username (sudo -u someuser command), it defaults to
    >>> you, the logged-in user (whoami), as the user, who is normally in the
    >>> adm group, or has root privileges in the /etc/sudoers file.
    >>>
    >>> The same as su (Switch User), which is not "Super User."
    >>>
    >>> I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or so as
    >>> another FAQ. ;-)

    >>
    >> I was going by the official Ubuntu doc.
    >>
    >> My understanding was that su was switch user, sudo was super user, for
    >> the simple reason that it can only be used from the first installed
    >> account and no others.

    >
    > That's simply because Ubuntu adds the first created user as a
    > sudoer... Other distros don't do this...


    There aren't many distro's that sudo is core to. Ubuntu and
    derivatives, yes. Most other debian and rpm distro's still require you
    set a root account.

    >> I know you can add further users to the sudoers group, but only from
    >> the first account (the super user).

    >
    > Technically, only from root (you can use sudo to acheive this... ;-)


    You can't actually log in as root though. Unless of course, you boot
    into recovery mode.

    >> Maybe it's Ubuntu's fault for re-defining traditional linux terms!!

    >
    > Indeed!


    Hell. They've moved the goalposts. I've no chance of socring a goal
    now. ;-)

    >> Heh. It's definitely not me. ;-)
    >>

    >
    > Doesn't mean I can't blame you... ;-)


    LOL. Why not? It's in "vogue" to do that recently.

    --
    "At my lemonade stand I used to give the first glass away free and
    charge five dollars for the second glass. The refill contained the
    antidote." ~ Emo Philips

  15. Re: modifying system file?

    Moog wrote:
    > Joe illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >> On 2008-07-01, Moog wrote:
    >>> John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>>> Moog wrote:
    >>>>>> Is "sudo" supervisor-do ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Super-user
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Switch User DO {this-and-that}.
    >>>>
    >>>> Without an optional username (sudo -u someuser command), it
    >>>> defaults to you, the logged-in user (whoami), as the user, who
    >>>> is normally in the adm group, or has root privileges in the
    >>>> /etc/sudoers file.
    >>>>
    >>>> The same as su (Switch User), which is not "Super User."
    >>>>
    >>>> I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or
    >>>> so as another FAQ. ;-)
    >>> I was going by the official Ubuntu doc.
    >>>
    >>> My understanding was that su was switch user, sudo was super
    >>> user, for the simple reason that it can only be used from the
    >>> first installed account and no others.

    >> That's simply because Ubuntu adds the first created user as a
    >> sudoer... Other distros don't do this...

    >
    > There aren't many distro's that sudo is core to. Ubuntu and
    > derivatives, yes. Most other debian and rpm distro's still require
    > you set a root account.
    >
    >>> I know you can add further users to the sudoers group, but only
    >>> from the first account (the super user).

    >> Technically, only from root (you can use sudo to acheive this...
    >> ;-)

    >
    > You can't actually log in as root though. Unless of course, you boot
    > into recovery mode.


    I Googled first,
    http://preview.tinyurl.com/3eae5k
    then did log in as root *before* really appreciating what rooted
    actually means. http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html#R

    When back online again I learned how to unroot
    sudo passwd -l root

    before I eventually Googled a super way to modify system files
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Ro...%20Drop%20Sudo

    Jeez,

    Maybe *nothing* can bend a learning curve like Google can?

    Bent Bob

    >
    >>> Maybe it's Ubuntu's fault for re-defining traditional linux
    >>> terms!!

    >> Indeed!

    >
    > Hell. They've moved the goalposts. I've no chance of socring a goal
    > now. ;-)
    >
    >>> Heh. It's definitely not me. ;-)
    >>>

    >> Doesn't mean I can't blame you... ;-)

    >
    > LOL. Why not? It's in "vogue" to do that recently.
    >


  16. Re: modifying system file?

    On 2008-07-01, Moog wrote:
    > Joe illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >> On 2008-07-01, Moog wrote:
    >>> John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>>> Moog wrote:
    >>>>>> Is "sudo" supervisor-do ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Super-user
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Switch User DO {this-and-that}.
    >>>>
    >>>> Without an optional username (sudo -u someuser command), it defaults to
    >>>> you, the logged-in user (whoami), as the user, who is normally in the
    >>>> adm group, or has root privileges in the /etc/sudoers file.
    >>>>
    >>>> The same as su (Switch User), which is not "Super User."
    >>>>
    >>>> I have a suspicion this will need to be reposted every month or so as
    >>>> another FAQ. ;-)
    >>>
    >>> I was going by the official Ubuntu doc.
    >>>
    >>> My understanding was that su was switch user, sudo was super user, for
    >>> the simple reason that it can only be used from the first installed
    >>> account and no others.

    >>
    >> That's simply because Ubuntu adds the first created user as a
    >> sudoer... Other distros don't do this...

    >
    > There aren't many distro's that sudo is core to. Ubuntu and
    > derivatives, yes. Most other debian and rpm distro's still require you
    > set a root account.


    Sudo is still part of the core install, it just isn't set up the same
    way. For instance, with Redhat (or CentOS), I can still use sudo, so
    long as I set the users up as sudoers. Sudo is still considered a
    useful tool, for allowing tracking and partial admin rights...

    >
    >>> I know you can add further users to the sudoers group, but only from
    >>> the first account (the super user).

    >>
    >> Technically, only from root (you can use sudo to acheive this... ;-)

    >
    > You can't actually log in as root though. Unless of course, you boot
    > into recovery mode.


    Sure, but when you sudo, you are using the root account. Without
    doing that, you are not able to edit the sudoers...

    And besides, I can log in as root... ;-)


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  17. Re: modifying system file?

    In article ,
    Dan C wrote:
    > > X-Newsreader: Microsoft Windows Mail 6.0.6001.18000

    >
    > Bugger off, Win-droid. Vista, no less! LOL. Wanker.


    Thus speaks the insecure noob.


    --
    --Tim Smith

  18. Re: modifying system file?

    On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 01:00:20 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:

    >> > X-Newsreader: Microsoft Windows Mail 6.0.6001.18000


    >> Bugger off, Win-droid. Vista, no less! LOL. Wanker.


    > Thus speaks the insecure noob.


    Insecure? Noob? LOL! HAR!!!

    > User-Agent: MT-NewsWatcher/3.5.3b2 (Intel Mac OS X)


    Bugger off, Mac-boy.


    --
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as he wiped out Ubuntu and installed Slackware.


  19. Re: modifying system file?

    In article ,
    Dan C wrote:
    >
    > > Thus speaks the insecure noob.

    >
    > Insecure? Noob? LOL! HAR!!!


    Yes, you are a noob. You demonstrate that all the time.

    Such as...

    >
    > > User-Agent: MT-NewsWatcher/3.5.3b2 (Intel Mac OS X)

    >
    > Bugger off, Mac-boy.


    A non-noob, for example, would know that the system one uses to post to
    usenet is pretty much irrelevant. A non-noob, for example, would pause
    to think, and recall that dmr used to post using Windows 95.

    A non-noob would be able to answer questions accurately and completely.
    Your answers to technical questions have indicated a grasp of the
    basics, but you miss the bigger picture, and so often miss the complete
    answer--and the incomplete answer can send the questioner down the wrong
    path.

    In short, a classic noob.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  20. Re: modifying system file?

    "Hobbes" wrote in message news:g485fu$r2o$1@aioe.org...
    > Alan Illeman wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > It's now 10AM (EST)
    > >
    > >> --
    > >> -bts
    > >> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    > >
    > >

    >
    > And yet...your driving it !


    As you've since learned, the signature belongs to one
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty - and no, I am not presently
    using wine/OE - just plain OE in Windows.



+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast