Just a few days left - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Just a few days left - Ubuntu ; On 2008-06-19, DanS wrote: > ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote in > news:slrng5lehk.t5c.ibuprofin@compton.phx.az.us: > >> On Thu, 19 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in >> article , derspankster wrote: >> >>>Wendell wrote: >> >>>>derspankster wrote: >>>> >>>>> Because my ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 37 of 37

Thread: Just a few days left

  1. Re: Just a few days left

    On 2008-06-19, DanS wrote:
    > ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote in
    > news:slrng5lehk.t5c.ibuprofin@compton.phx.az.us:
    >
    >> On Thu, 19 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in
    >> article <485a6785$0$5714$4c368faf@roadrunner.com>, derspankster wrote:
    >>
    >>>Wendell wrote:

    >>
    >>>>derspankster wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Because my provider, Time Warner is eliminating newsgroups, my days
    >>>>> lurking and reading this group are coming to an end. I doubt that
    >>>>> I'll pay extra for newsgroups from another provider so I must say
    >>>>> goodbye to all. I have enjoyed the group over the years. The best
    >>>>> to all.

    >>
    >> You could always tell Time Warner to shove it where the sun don't
    >> shine, and replace the incompetent idiots with a provider that
    >> actually has access to a functioning brain cell, but that's a personal
    >> decision.

    >
    > It's kind of hard to dump TW when it's the only broadband that serves my
    > address.
    >
    >


    Sure, but you are not required to use their nntp server. I use TW
    because nothing else available here comes close to RoadRunner Turbo in
    speed. But I have never connected to their news or mail servers. Not
    for a second. They are junk to begin with.

    Now, I personally pay for the mid-level service from giganews, as that
    gives me a certain level of service that I sometimes require. But if
    you are just using the text based usenet groups, try news.datemas.de
    or motzarella.org, or one of the other various free services.

    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  2. Re: Just a few days left

    On 2008-06-19, ray wrote:
    > On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 07:49:57 -0400, derspankster wrote:
    >
    >> Because my provider, Time Warner is eliminating newsgroups, my days
    >> lurking and reading this group are coming to an end. I doubt that I'll
    >> pay extra for newsgroups from another provider so I must say goodbye to
    >> all. I have enjoyed the group over the years. The best to all.

    >
    > FWIW - my ISP does not provide news server - never has as far as I can
    > tell. I have used news.individual.net for several years with complete
    > satisfaction. Their performance exceeds that of any ISP i've tried. Cost
    > is on the order of one euro per month - shouldn't bread the bank.



    I like breaded chicken.

    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  3. Re: Just a few days left

    On 19 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    , DanS wrote:

    >ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote


    >> You could always tell Time Warner to shove it where the sun don't
    >> shine, and replace the incompetent idiots with a provider that
    >> actually has access to a functioning brain cell, but that's a
    >> personal decision.

    >
    >It's kind of hard to dump TW when it's the only broadband that serves
    >my address.


    Is it? My local is Cox, and I wouldn't consider them, or recommend
    them to any enemy, but that's hardly the only game in town. Are you
    outside of DSL range?

    http://www.business.com/directory/in...ernet_service_
    providers_isp/isps_by_country/united_states/

    That's all one line. I make no guarantees, and have no preference.
    There are also wireless providers, but they tend to be more expensive
    and less reliable.

    Old guy

  4. Re: Just a few days left

    On 2008-06-21, Moe Trin wrote:
    > On 19 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    >, DanS wrote:
    >
    >>ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote

    >
    >>> You could always tell Time Warner to shove it where the sun don't
    >>> shine, and replace the incompetent idiots with a provider that
    >>> actually has access to a functioning brain cell, but that's a
    >>> personal decision.

    >>
    >>It's kind of hard to dump TW when it's the only broadband that serves
    >>my address.

    >
    > Is it? My local is Cox, and I wouldn't consider them, or recommend
    > them to any enemy, but that's hardly the only game in town. Are you
    > outside of DSL range?
    >
    > http://www.business.com/directory/in...ernet_service_
    > providers_isp/isps_by_country/united_states/
    >
    > That's all one line. I make no guarantees, and have no preference.
    > There are also wireless providers, but they tend to be more expensive
    > and less reliable.


    I can't answer for the OP, but DSL at my house is 768k max. It's not
    a reasonable choice. I'll consider verizon again once FIOS is
    available in my neighborhood, but considering the reliability and
    speed I get from Time Warner, I'm not sure that I'll move...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  5. Re: Just a few days left

    In Moe Trin:

    [Snip...]

    > there are ways around such road blocks - many ways


    Speaking for myself, these morons need my $CASH a lot more than I need any
    of their "sanctioned" services. Thank $DEITY for FOSS and visionaries like
    Mark Shuttleworth to answer political busybodies like Mario Cuomo.

    > You can still find dialups that accept 300 BPS?




    From WordNet (r) 2.0 (wn)

    facetious adj : cleverly amusing in tone; "a bantering tone";
    "facetious remarks"; "tongue-in-cheek advice" [syn: {bantering},
    {tongue-in-cheek}]



    > the slowest connection I could negotiate was 1200 BPS (v.22bis)


    FWIW, I did email, text editing, job control, etc. via DEC vt220 terminals
    and 1200 BPS VAXen dialups for years in the late 80's and early 90's. That
    was serious business then, mostly supporting unclassified aerospace design
    jobs (running on various mainframes at my workplace) from home.

    Ergo IMO, Mario Cuomo and other clumsy amateurs are very late to the game.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    I toss GoogleGroup posts from gitgo (http://improve-usenet.org).

  6. Re: Just a few days left

    Bada bing Harold Stevens bada bang:
    > In Moe Trin:
    >
    > [Snip...]
    >
    >> there are ways around such road blocks - Smany ways

    >
    > Speaking for myself, these morons need my $CASH a lot more than I need any
    > of their "sanctioned" services. Thank $DEITY for FOSS and visionaries like
    > Mark Shuttleworth to answer political busybodies like Mario Cuomo.
    >


    Did you mean _Andrew_ Cuomo, the NYS Attorney General?

    >> You can still find dialups that accept 300 BPS?

    >
    >
    >
    > From WordNet (r) 2.0 (wn)
    >
    > facetious adj : cleverly amusing in tone; "a bantering tone";
    > "facetious remarks"; "tongue-in-cheek advice" [syn: {bantering},
    > {tongue-in-cheek}]
    >
    >
    >
    >> the slowest connection I could negotiate was 1200 BPS (v.22bis)

    >
    > FWIW, I did email, text editing, job control, etc. via DEC vt220 terminals
    > and 1200 BPS VAXen dialups for years in the late 80's and early 90's. That
    > was serious business then, mostly supporting unclassified aerospace design
    > jobs (running on various mainframes at my workplace) from home.
    >
    > Ergo IMO, Mario Cuomo and other clumsy amateurs are very late to the game.
    >


    Or did you mean Mario Andretti?

    Mike "there's a difference, you know" Yetto
    --
    Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitas.
    - William of Ockham

  7. Re: Just a few days left

    In Mike Yetto:

    [Snip...]

    > Mike "there's a difference, you know" Yetto


    Whichever of the Mario Brothers is fscking Usenet now; yeah, that one.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    I toss GoogleGroup posts from gitgo (http://improve-usenet.org).

  8. Re: Just a few days left

    Harold Stevens wrote:
    > Ergo IMO, Mario Cuomo and other clumsy amateurs are very late to the game.


    Mario Cuomo left the NY governor's mansion many years ago.


    --
    Wes Groleau
    http://groleau.freeshell.org/teaching/

  9. Re: Just a few days left

    Wes Groleau wrote:

    > Harold Stevens wrote:
    >> Ergo IMO, Mario Cuomo and other clumsy amateurs are very late to the
    >> game.

    >
    > Mario Cuomo left the NY governor's mansion many years ago.


    ...and Andrew, the Usenet Killer, is his son.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

  10. Re: Just a few days left

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    , Harold Stevens wrote:

    >In Moe Trin:


    >> the slowest connection I could negotiate was 1200 BPS (v.22bis)

    >
    >FWIW, I did email, text editing, job control, etc. via DEC vt220
    >terminals and 1200 BPS VAXen dialups for years in the late 80's and
    >early 90's.


    Texas Instruments Silent/700 - complete with the foam cups you dropped
    the phone headset into. They were a lot better than the ASR-33, but
    not as quiet as your DECs.

    >That was serious business then, mostly supporting unclassified
    >aerospace design jobs (running on various mainframes at my workplace)
    >from home.


    Yeah, I remember who that was. My wife didn't start working from home
    until about 1994, monitoring jobs on a mainframe at the data-center
    600 miles away. The problem with working from home is that we're
    both salaried (don't get overtime) and invariably these "oh by the
    way, could you..." tasks are run after normal business hours. Still,
    it's better than having to drive in to work at some horrible hour and
    do the same job there.

    Old guy

  11. Re: Just a few days left

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > Texas Instruments Silent/700 - complete with the foam cups you dropped
    > the phone headset into. They were a lot better than the ASR-33, but
    > not as quiet as your DECs.


    Huh?

    The Silent 700 was just that -- silent. Of course the thermal paper
    stunk and was expensive.

    The DECs certainly weren't quiet. The noisy TP-1000's Zip-Zip-Zip kept
    you on edge. Probably quieter than a Teletype Model 33 though.

    The Model 35, like the 28, was quieter since it didn't bounce along on a
    "rubber band" so much, or slowly walk across the floor. Ever run a 33 on
    a wooden floor and go downstairs to listen? Or worse, a Model 15!

    Perhaps your's needed a squirt of oil? Many times I've dropped the whole
    print assembly into a vat of oil, then let it drip "dry." Really makes a
    nice machine run even quieter and smoother.

    Oh, those were the Model 15s, 28s and 35s. You couldn't do that to a 33,
    40 or 43.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  12. Re: Just a few days left

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    , John F. Morse wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:
    >
    >> Texas Instruments Silent/700 - complete with the foam cups you
    >> dropped the phone headset into. They were a lot better than the
    >> ASR-33, but not as quiet as your DECs.

    >
    >Huh?
    >
    >The Silent 700 was just that -- silent.


    Not that I recall - It's been a few (17?) years since I seen one (and
    probably over 25 years since I used one even occasionally), but the
    stepper motor that positioned the print head made noise, as did the
    paper feed.

    >Of course the thermal paper stunk and was expensive.


    I didn't pay for that - the company supplied it in six-packs. I don't
    recall much smell, but I was a smoker back then. The paper was pretty
    lousy though.

    >The DECs certainly weren't quiet. The noisy TP-1000's Zip-Zip-Zip
    >kept you on edge. Probably quieter than a Teletype Model 33 though.


    I only had a DEC for a short time. Mostly, I had some
    other crappy terminal, up until about 1984 when we switched to PC
    clones. Most of the terminals were silent, except for the high
    frequency scream of the flybacks. I don't think that many of them
    even had fans.

    >The Model 35, like the 28, was quieter since it didn't bounce along on
    >a "rubber band" so much, or slowly walk across the floor. Ever run a
    >33 on a wooden floor and go downstairs to listen? Or worse, a Model 15!


    They had an excuse - they were mechanical nightmares.

    >Perhaps your's needed a squirt of oil? Many times I've dropped the
    >whole print assembly into a vat of oil, then let it drip "dry." Really
    >makes a nice machine run even quieter and smoother.


    I would never try that - these were at least company property, and
    rarely government stuff. It's not working right means it's time to
    take it in and give it to the hardware group.

    Old guy

  13. Re: Just a few days left

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > On Sun, 22 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    > , John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Moe Trin wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Texas Instruments Silent/700 - complete with the foam cups you
    >>> dropped the phone headset into. They were a lot better than the
    >>> ASR-33, but not as quiet as your DECs.
    >>>

    >> Huh?
    >>
    >> The Silent 700 was just that -- silent.
    >>

    >
    > Not that I recall - It's been a few (17?) years since I seen one (and
    > probably over 25 years since I used one even occasionally), but the
    > stepper motor that positioned the print head made noise, as did the
    > paper feed.
    >



    Hah! It's been 30 years since I saw one, around 1978, when my wife
    borrowed one from her Realty business owner. I hooked it up to my Apple ][.

    It was very quiet. It had the acoustic coupler. I borrowed another one
    from Southwestern Bell where I worked. It didn't have the acoustic
    coupler but instead had a DB-25 serial connector.

    I be you had one that was just plain worn out. Kinda like old people and
    their knees, etc.


    >> Of course the thermal paper stunk and was expensive.
    >>

    >
    > I didn't pay for that - the company supplied it in six-packs. I don't
    > recall much smell, but I was a smoker back then. The paper was pretty
    > lousy though.
    >



    I smoked then too, but I can remember that thermal paper odor. I don't
    think I ever bought a roll, since "work" had cases of it.

    I really hated having to cut the curling paper up into page sized sheets
    so I could file it.


    >> The DECs certainly weren't quiet. The noisy TP-1000's Zip-Zip-Zip
    >> kept you on edge. Probably quieter than a Teletype Model 33 though.
    >>

    >
    > I only had a DEC for a short time. Mostly, I had some
    > other crappy terminal, up until about 1984 when we switched to PC
    > clones. Most of the terminals were silent, except for the high
    > frequency scream of the flybacks. I don't think that many of them
    > even had fans.
    >



    We had a DEC connected to the DEC PDP 11/70 in the Switching Control
    Center. It wasn't quiet, even in that room with all the PDP 11/70 fans,
    air conditioning, other Model 33 Teletypes, a copy machine, ....

    I've worked on many TP-1000 printers which are identical to the LA-34 or
    LA-36 (whatever they were called). The printhead wires made a singing
    noise as they moved across the metal strike bar behind the paper.


    >> The Model 35, like the 28, was quieter since it didn't bounce along on
    >> a "rubber band" so much, or slowly walk across the floor. Ever run a
    >> 33 on a wooden floor and go downstairs to listen? Or worse, a Model 15!
    >>

    >
    > They had an excuse - they were mechanical nightmares.
    >



    They certainly were! I kinda miss messing with the old Model 15s using
    ham radio RTTY. I remember leaving one run while I went downstairs to
    eat supper. I could hear it thumping away through the ceiling. After
    dinner, I returned to the second floor radio shack and found the Model
    15 about six feet from where I had left it!

    It was stopped from going further because the signal cable was stretched
    tight, holding it back. If not for the cable, it probably would have
    eventually found the top of the stairs and committed suicide!


    >> Perhaps your's needed a squirt of oil? Many times I've dropped the
    >> whole print assembly into a vat of oil, then let it drip "dry." Really
    >> makes a nice machine run even quieter and smoother.
    >>

    >
    > I would never try that - these were at least company property, and
    > rarely government stuff. It's not working right means it's time to
    > take it in and give it to the hardware group.
    >
    > Old guy
    >



    Well that was my job. I was a Teletypeman, later called a Teletype
    Technician when the women objected to the sexist title.

    I worked on a lot of Model 15 KSR and the similar Model 19 ASR when in
    the Army in Alaska. I only remember one Model 28 ASR back then, and it
    was at Post Signal, used for sending telegrams by the troops to wherever
    the other end was (Western Union perhaps).

    When I was a TTY Tech for Southwestern Bell, I can remember only one
    Model 15 at an old M-K-T ("Katy") railroad station in Lenexa, KS.

    We had a 28 KSR that was the "terminal" for a 101 ESS control unit. All
    the big 1ESS switches used Model 35 KSR and 35 ASR Teletypes. The main
    reason to switch was to use 8-bit ASCII instead of 5-level Baudot,
    exemplified by the four-row keyboard compared to the three-row used on
    Baudot.

    When they went to 1AESS, the Dataspeed 40 Teletype was used, and the
    speed jumped from 110 speed (100 WPM/10 CPS) to 1200 BPS. The Models 15,
    19 and 28 were 60 WPM. The 28 was a really tough TTY and could do 100
    with the proper gears, but the life expectancy was somewhat reduced.

    The Dataspeed 40 could actually go much faster, since it was a
    solid-state controller-driven CRT. Its connected printer was the
    limiting factor though. Then the type of printer, 80 vs 132 column, and
    the type chain. Some used an upper and lower case chain, and some only
    upper case, which has two (on the 80 column) or three (on the 132
    column) complete alphabets, giving the opportunity to strike a certain
    character in a certain column more frequently.

    I've seen a 132 column uppercase only Model 40 ROP keep up with a 208A
    Data Set, which is a 4800 BPS 4-wire private line data modem. It can eat
    up a box of fanfold, sprocket feed paper in less than an hour.

    It didn't hurt the old units to dunk them under in a vat of oil. It was
    only metallic parts, no motor, ribbon, rubber, etc.

    You did need to let then stand overnight on a drip tray though, or you
    would have a mess in their mounting and cabinet. Guess whose job it was
    to keep cabinets clean? ;-)

    Customers wouldn't do the work, and it was really better if they keepen
    das hands in der pockets and vatched dem blinkin lites anywayz.

    You can put too much oil in an automobile engine, but there is no limit
    for a mechanical Teletype (or teletypewriter), or any other machinery
    where the lubricant isn't likely to be compressed or "beaten into suds"
    like a revolving crankshaft counterweight can do. The only harm is in
    the resulting mess. ;-)

    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  14. Re: Just a few days left

    In Moe Trin:

    [Snip...]

    > I only had a DEC for a short time


    FWIW, the vt220 series I had at home were video terminals (NOT mechanical
    teletypes of any sort), and (as you mentioned) totally silent.

    No way I could have stayed married with teletype noise in our house.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    I toss GoogleGroup posts from gitgo (http://improve-usenet.org).

  15. Re: Just a few days left

    CBFalconer wrote:
    > derspankster wrote:
    >> Because my provider, Time Warner is eliminating newsgroups, my
    >> days lurking and reading this group are coming to an end. I doubt
    >> that I'll pay extra for newsgroups from another provider so I
    >> must say goodbye to all. I have enjoyed the group over the years.
    >> The best to all.

    >
    > Try something listed in my sig. below.
    >

    Well, here it is the 23rd and I still have TW newsgroups. Wonder for how
    much longer?

  16. Re: Just a few days left

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    , John F. Morse wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >> John F. Morse wrote:


    >>> The Silent 700 was just that -- silent.


    >> Not that I recall - It's been a few (17?) years since I seen one (and
    >> probably over 25 years since I used one even occasionally), but the
    >> stepper motor that positioned the print head made noise, as did the
    >> paper feed.


    >Hah! It's been 30 years since I saw one, around 1978, when my wife
    >borrowed one from her Realty business owner. I hooked it up to my Apple
    >][.


    First one I got was in 1975, on loan from the Feds. TI was involved
    in the hardware design, and included one as part of the project.

    >It was very quiet. It had the acoustic coupler. I borrowed another one
    >from Southwestern Bell where I worked. It didn't have the acoustic
    >coupler but instead had a DB-25 serial connector.


    There were a number of different models, all sharing the basic hardware,
    but some were portables, some were desktop, and some came with a set
    of panels that acted as (floor length) legs. A co-worker remembers that
    the print head itself made some noise, but agrees that the head and
    platen motors were noisy (but no where near as bad as an ASR-33).

    >I be you had one that was just plain worn out. Kinda like old people
    >and their knees, etc.


    ;-) I'd think not, as the units were new when we got them.

    >I really hated having to cut the curling paper up into page sized
    >sheets so I could file it.


    Yes - that was a real problem - coupled with the fact that the printing
    faded over time.

    >We had a DEC connected to the DEC PDP 11/70 in the Switching Control
    >Center. It wasn't quiet, even in that room with all the PDP 11/70 fans,
    >air conditioning, other Model 33 Teletypes, a copy machine, ....


    If it was anything like our dinosaur pens, you couldn't hear yourself
    think in there - and even a ASR-33 would have sounded muted.

    >They certainly were! I kinda miss messing with the old Model 15s using
    >ham radio RTTY. I remember leaving one run while I went downstairs to
    >eat supper. I could hear it thumping away through the ceiling. After
    >dinner, I returned to the second floor radio shack and found the Model
    >15 about six feet from where I had left it!


    That sounds seriously wrong. I don't recall any of them walking that
    badly, but then the units I was familiar with were basically table-top
    units setting on their own table which also had a ton of paper in the
    bottom. Seems to me I also remember them sitting on a one inch thick
    soft rubber pad.

    >It was stopped from going further because the signal cable was
    >stretched tight, holding it back. If not for the cable, it probably
    >would have eventually found the top of the stairs and committed suicide!


    damaging the wall and floor in the process.

    >Well that was my job. I was a Teletypeman, later called a Teletype
    >Technician when the women objected to the sexist title.
    >
    >I worked on a lot of Model 15 KSR and the similar Model 19 ASR when in
    >the Army in Alaska. I only remember one Model 28 ASR back then, and it
    >was at Post Signal, used for sending telegrams by the troops to wherever
    >the other end was (Western Union perhaps).


    I've forgotten most of the terminals we were using back then. Most of
    the people were using punched cards, and seeing the output some time
    later as fan-fold printouts. We had some TeleType systems, but by the
    time I got into it heavy, we had switched to stuff like the TI 700s. We
    had a LOT of the early CRT type systems. By about 1982, even the CRT
    type terminals were starting to be replaced with IBM clones.

    Old guy

  17. Re: Just a few days left

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.ubuntu, in article
    , Harold Stevens wrote:

    >> I only had a DEC for a short time

    >
    >FWIW, the vt220 series I had at home were video terminals (NOT mechanical
    >teletypes of any sort), and (as you mentioned) totally silent.


    It's been years, but I vaguely recall vt52s, vt100s, and vt220s, but
    I've long since forgotten which was which.

    >No way I could have stayed married with teletype noise in our house.


    There is that. It was bad enough with the d4mn daisy wheel printers
    and even the Epson FX-80s made far to much noise for my wife. Of course
    things changed a bit when she had to have a printer on her system,
    but that's _completely_ different. ;-)

    Old guy

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2