Clean up old kernels in ubuntu - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Clean up old kernels in ubuntu - Ubuntu ; * Meat Plow wrote in alt.os.linux.debian: > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 19:27:18 +0000, Peter J Ross wrote: > >> In alt.os.linux.debian on Tue, 17 Jun 2008 15:07:13 -0400, Meat Plow >> wrote: >> >>> The menu list is easy ...

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Thread: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

  1. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    * Meat Plow wrote in alt.os.linux.debian:

    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 19:27:18 +0000, Peter J Ross wrote:
    >
    >> In alt.os.linux.debian on Tue, 17 Jun 2008 15:07:13 -0400, Meat Plow
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The menu list is easy and safe to edit, just make a backup copy.
    >>> Read the list in Kate or your favorite gui editor and it will tell
    >>> you how to edit it.

    >>
    >> This will, however, need to be done as root. And the menu list will
    >> reappear whenever "update-grub" is run automatically, for example
    >> when a new kernel upgrade is available. Removing the packages with
    >> apt / aptitude / synaptic / adept is probably best.

    >
    > Nah hand removing is the easiest. And it's a given if the user knows
    > anything about linux that the file cannot be saved unless you are root
    > or su.


    Easier than unchecking an option in Synaptic? I disagree.

    >
    >>
    >>> The initrd and vmlinuz modules are all marked with the same build
    >>> numbers. However they do not occupy much space at all maybe 50 megs
    >>> for 4 successive build updates. If you're scrimping for 50 megs you
    >>> should upgrade your storage.

    >>
    >> Some people use a small partition for /boot. In any case, keeping
    >> obsolete kernels, which have perhaps been updated because of security
    >> holes, may not be a good idea.

    >
    > Not an issue if the kernel isn't being used. However I guess I might
    > be giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably
    > should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.
    >


    VMWare Player in Ubuntu was broken because of a kernal update, had I
    removed old kernals I would not have been able to make it work. I always
    keep at least one iteration back if not 2 and I do also keep a very small
    /boot partition (~50 meg)

    --
    David

  2. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 18:41:51 +0200, Mark Madsen wrote:

    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:15:10 -0400, Meat Plow wrote:
    >
    >> However I guess I might be
    >> giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably
    >> should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.

    >
    > There are newbies who write in this group too....


    Semantics.




  3. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:52:04 +0000, SINNER wrote:

    > * Meat Plow wrote in alt.os.linux.debian:
    >
    >> On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 19:27:18 +0000, Peter J Ross wrote:
    >>
    >>> In alt.os.linux.debian on Tue, 17 Jun 2008 15:07:13 -0400, Meat Plow
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> The menu list is easy and safe to edit, just make a backup copy. Read
    >>>> the list in Kate or your favorite gui editor and it will tell you how
    >>>> to edit it.
    >>>
    >>> This will, however, need to be done as root. And the menu list will
    >>> reappear whenever "update-grub" is run automatically, for example when
    >>> a new kernel upgrade is available. Removing the packages with apt /
    >>> aptitude / synaptic / adept is probably best.

    >>
    >> Nah hand removing is the easiest. And it's a given if the user knows
    >> anything about linux that the file cannot be saved unless you are root
    >> or su.

    >
    > Easier than unchecking an option in Synaptic? I disagree.


    Personal choice.

    >
    >>
    >>>> The initrd and vmlinuz modules are all marked with the same build
    >>>> numbers. However they do not occupy much space at all maybe 50 megs
    >>>> for 4 successive build updates. If you're scrimping for 50 megs you
    >>>> should upgrade your storage.
    >>>
    >>> Some people use a small partition for /boot. In any case, keeping
    >>> obsolete kernels, which have perhaps been updated because of security
    >>> holes, may not be a good idea.

    >>
    >> Not an issue if the kernel isn't being used. However I guess I might be
    >> giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably
    >> should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.
    >>
    >>

    > VMWare Player in Ubuntu was broken because of a kernal update, had I
    > removed old kernals I would not have been able to make it work. I always
    > keep at least one iteration back if not 2 and I do also keep a very small
    > /boot partition (~50 meg)


    I keep an entire drive mirrored then shelved once I get things tweaked.
    Things go haywire or the drive pukes as happened to me just a couple
    months ago and I'm back in minutes. I use a scheduled rdiff-backup to copy
    modified or new data from /home to a network storage device which mirrors
    itself to a hidden drive every morning. This strategy to maintain the
    integrity of my data was put into use in May when my drive failed and
    functioned perfectly.



  4. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:15:10 -0400, Meat Plow wrote:

    > giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably should
    > realize that some n00bs actually read this group.


    Well, yeah. You read it, don't you?


    --
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as he descended down into Shayol Ghul.


  5. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 18:41:51 +0200, Mark Madsen wrote:

    >> giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably
    >> should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.


    > There are newbies who write in this group too....


    Yup, and "Meat Plow" is a prime example of that.


    --
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as he found Earl in his honey pot.


  6. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    propman schrieb:

    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 14:47:30 +0200, Andreas Wagner wrote:
    >> By the way: aptitude also automatically cared about the header-files,
    >> which were orphaned after uninstalling the kernel-image and removed
    >> them too.

    >
    > Are these "header files" related to recompiling the kernel or....?


    For recompiling, you need the "linux-source"-package.
    The "linux-header"-package is needed to compile additional modules, if
    I remember correctly. Search the web and find out.

    > Also where would they be located?


    In my case: /usr/src/linux-headers-2.6.24-19-rt

    > I'm interested to see if Boot Manager also removed the old ones.


    Do a

    man aptitude
    aptitude --help
    aptitude search linux-headers

    to look up, wether there are any "linux-header"-packages installed. They
    have an "i" in the first column. If so, do a

    man dpkg-query
    dpkg-query -L linux-headers-2.6.24-19-rt

    but replace the "linux-headers-2.6.24-19-rt" with one of the previous
    results marked as being installed.

    You might want to pipe some results through "less". Looks like that:

    man less
    ls /usr/share/doc | less

    > Thanks! :-)


    No problem
    Andreas

  7. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 20:44:39 +0200, Andreas Wagner wrote:

    > propman schrieb:
    >
    >> On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 14:47:30 +0200, Andreas Wagner wrote:
    >>> By the way: aptitude also automatically cared about the header-files,
    >>> which were orphaned after uninstalling the kernel-image and removed
    >>> them too.

    >>
    >> Are these "header files" related to recompiling the kernel or....?


    >> Also where would they be located?

    >
    > In my case: /usr/src/linux-headers-2.6.24-19-rt


    Fantastic, Andreas.....thanks for including so much information. Much
    appreciated! :-)


  8. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    In Wed, 18 Jun 2008 01:25:51, Jim Cochrane wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:
    > On 2008-06-18, Moog wrote:
    >> Dan C illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>> On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 22:18:51 +0000, Moog wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>> No problem. It beats the hell out of b0rking the klack out of your
    >>>>>> menu.list using nano from within single user mode. ;-)
    >>>
    >>>>> Nano? Weak!
    >>>
    >>>> I do use vim, but is it installed by default? I mentioned Nano for the
    >>>> benefit of the n00bs. ;-)
    >>>
    >>> You're the n00b, if you think editing menu.lst with nano (or with vi) is
    >>> something hard or scary.
    >>>
    >>> Ooooohhhh! Using a text editor??? Oh my! That's too complicated!
    >>>
    >>> LOL. n00b.

    >>
    >> Heh. Hi Dan.
    >>
    >> Honestly. You seem to have lost your eyesight. The winky smiley things
    >> are intended as a guide.
    >>
    >> Still. I wouldn't have expected anything else from you.
    >>
    >> Well. Actually, a "bugger off" or a "win-droid" would have been nice.
    >> You *have* go a reputation to uphold, dontcha know!
    >>

    >
    > [Damn - I've killfiled Dan C, but I keep seeing his messages anyway
    > because people keep replying to him. Maybe I should just killfile
    > everybody ;-) ]
    >


    Haven't tried it myself but shouldn't slrn be able to kill
    any post that answers one from Grumpy Danny? Something like:

    Score:: =-9999
    References: youmustbejoking@lan\.invalid\.fqdn>$

    If it works, I'd seriously consider moving to slrn...

    Saludos,
    AHG
    --
    Laughing Stock: A herd of cows with ticklish teats.
    15:37:48 up 7:36, 5 users, load average: 0.94, 0.47, 0.63

  9. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:20:43 -0500, Dan C wrote:

    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:15:10 -0400, Meat Plow wrote:
    >
    >> giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably
    >> should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.

    >
    > Well, yeah. You read it, don't you?


    Well yeah. You read it don't you?




  10. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:21:21 -0500, Dan C wrote:

    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 18:41:51 +0200, Mark Madsen wrote:
    >
    >>> giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably
    >>> should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.

    >
    >> There are newbies who write in this group too....

    >
    > Yup, and "Meat Plow" is a prime example of that.


    Ah poor wittle baby crying about bad old Meat Plow again? Here ya go;

    http://www.mondaymorninginsight.com/...ds/Kleenex.jpg

    heh

  11. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    * Meat Plow wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:52:04 +0000, SINNER wrote:
    >
    >> * Meat Plow wrote in alt.os.linux.debian:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 19:27:18 +0000, Peter J Ross wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In alt.os.linux.debian on Tue, 17 Jun 2008 15:07:13 -0400, Meat
    >>>> Plow wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> The menu list is easy and safe to edit, just make a backup copy.
    >>>>> Read the list in Kate or your favorite gui editor and it will tell
    >>>>> you how to edit it.
    >>>>
    >>>> This will, however, need to be done as root. And the menu list will
    >>>> reappear whenever "update-grub" is run automatically, for example
    >>>> when a new kernel upgrade is available. Removing the packages with
    >>>> apt / aptitude / synaptic / adept is probably best.
    >>>
    >>> Nah hand removing is the easiest. And it's a given if the user knows
    >>> anything about linux that the file cannot be saved unless you are
    >>> root or su.

    >>
    >> Easier than unchecking an option in Synaptic? I disagree.

    >
    > Personal choice.


    No, Personal Choice is how you choose to do it, easy is easy. Telling
    synaptic to do the work is easier. Saying that doing it by hand, which
    means removing various files from differnet locations and editing configs
    is easier is misleading and has nothing to do with choice. If you are
    more comfortable at the CLI then using apt-get is still easier.

    >>>>> The initrd and vmlinuz modules are all marked with the same build
    >>>>> numbers. However they do not occupy much space at all maybe 50
    >>>>> megs for 4 successive build updates. If you're scrimping for 50
    >>>>> megs you should upgrade your storage.
    >>>>
    >>>> Some people use a small partition for /boot. In any case, keeping
    >>>> obsolete kernels, which have perhaps been updated because of
    >>>> security holes, may not be a good idea.
    >>>
    >>> Not an issue if the kernel isn't being used. However I guess I might
    >>> be giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I
    >>> probably should realize that some n00bs actually read this group.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> VMWare Player in Ubuntu was broken because of a kernal update, had I
    >> removed old kernals I would not have been able to make it work. I
    >> always keep at least one iteration back if not 2 and I do also keep a
    >> very small /boot partition (~50 meg)

    >
    > I keep an entire drive mirrored then shelved once I get things
    > tweaked. Things go haywire or the drive pukes as happened to me just a
    > couple months ago and I'm back in minutes. I use a scheduled
    > rdiff-backup to copy modified or new data from /home to a network
    > storage device which mirrors itself to a hidden drive every morning.
    > This strategy to maintain the integrity of my data was put into use in
    > May when my drive failed and functioned perfectly.


    And yet all I needed to do was reboot and select an older kernel, your
    way seems a bit like overkill. Restore a whole OS to fix a kernel related
    issue? Not to mention I hope you have several rdiff's or your backup
    strategy needs some tweaking.

    --
    David


  12. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    Andreas Wagner wrote:
    > In my case: /usr/src/linux-headers-2.6.24-19-rt


    Curious, why did you choose the 'rt - real time preemption patch', and
    how does it differ from the -generic kernel?

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  13. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On 18 Jun 2008 19:40:01 GMT, Andres E. Hernando wrote:

    > Haven't tried it myself but shouldn't slrn be able to kill
    > any post that answers one from Grumpy Danny? Something like:
    >
    > Score:: =-9999
    > References: youmustbejoking@lan\.invalid\.fqdn>$
    >
    > If it works, I'd seriously consider moving to slrn...


    You would not even have to add backslashes for slrn to catch it.
    Score:: =-9999
    References: youmustbejoking@lan.invalid.fqdn


    If you want to use cleanscore, you can even set expiration dates to
    remove scoring rules. Some snippets from my kill file.

    Score: =-9999
    Expires: 6/27/2008
    Subject: Whoops, didn't mean to send
    Score: =-9999
    Expires: 6/27/2008
    From: F8BOE
    Score: =-9999
    NNTP-Posting-Host: 76.175.60.147
    Score: =-9999
    Subject: Notice to Newcomers
    Score: 666
    From: hadronquark

    cleanscore can be found in the site map box at http://www.slrn.org/

  14. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    johnny bobby bee wrote:

    > Andreas Wagner wrote:
    >> In my case: /usr/src/linux-headers-2.6.24-19-rt

    >
    > Curious, why did you choose the 'rt - real time preemption patch',


    I used some audio-applications and hoped it decreases the latency. I
    especially had problems with JACK (JACK audio connection kit; see
    wikipedia for explanation) having buffer-underruns. Using the RT-kernel
    and giving apropiate rights and using the right options solved that, if
    I remember correctly. Ther's a lot in the net about that.

    > and how does it differ from the -generic kernel?


    There should be more reliable and complete information about that in the
    net than that, what I can say. Just search for linux real time kernel.

    Greetings
    Andreas

  15. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:01:04 -0400, Meat Plow wrote:

    >>> There are newbies who write in this group too....


    >> Yup, and "Meat Plow" is a prime example of that.


    > Ah poor wittle baby crying about bad old Meat Plow again? Here ya go;


    Crying? No. Where'd you get that idea, n00b?


    --
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as he clubbed another baby seal.


  16. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    On 2008-06-17, Meat Plow wrote:

    > The menu list is easy and safe to edit, just make a backup copy. Read the
    > list in Kate or your favorite gui editor and it will tell you how to edit
    > it. The initrd and vmlinuz modules are all marked with the same build
    > numbers. However they do not occupy much space at all maybe 50 megs for 4
    > successive build updates. If you're scrimping for 50 megs you should
    > upgrade your storage.
    >


    Considering that *nix "accepted standards" have usually been a /boot
    partition of 100M, 50M is about half of the space. Not everyone uses
    the brain-dead 'give all space to /' philosophy...

    Also, when you remove the boot entries, you should probably remove the
    associated modules directories...

    I have never done it this way, but I have read that you can do it in
    Synaptic by simply de-selecting the kernels you don't want anymore...


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  17. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > Matt wrote:
    >
    >> You could set up something like a cron job that would (by some
    >> combination of ls -a, wc, sed, perl, and tail) find all old vmlinuz*
    >> files in /boot and remove the associated packages using apt or so, as
    >> suggested by Andreas.
    >>
    >> Instead of a cron job, you could run it at boot time, since you will
    >> be rebooting after updating to your new kernel. That way you could
    >> assume the invariant that there would be at most one old kernel. Then
    >> you could just remove the package for the older of the two vmlinuz*
    >> files, if there were more than one at boot time.

    >
    >
    > A roofer could use a ten-pound sledge hammer to make sure all the nails
    > were fully driven.
    >
    > Just how difficult is it to remove a kernel once every 90 days?



    I think I can say that it is somewhat more difficult than putting me in
    your kill file.

  18. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    In alt.os.linux.debian on Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:15:10 -0400, Meat Plow
    wrote:

    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 19:27:18 +0000, Peter J Ross wrote:
    >
    >> In alt.os.linux.debian on Tue, 17 Jun 2008 15:07:13 -0400, Meat Plow
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The menu list is easy and safe to edit, just make a backup copy. Read
    >>> the list in Kate or your favorite gui editor and it will tell you how to
    >>> edit it.

    >>
    >> This will, however, need to be done as root. And the menu list will
    >> reappear whenever "update-grub" is run automatically, for example when a
    >> new kernel upgrade is available. Removing the packages with apt / aptitude
    >> / synaptic / adept is probably best.

    >
    > Nah hand removing is the easiest.


    Not in my experience. Even custom kernels are easier to remove if
    made into a .deb package for installation.

    > And it's a given if the user knows
    > anything about linux that the file cannot be saved unless you are root or
    > su.


    Ubuntu users aren't necessarily experienced Linux users. "sudo kate"
    will allow the menu.lst to be edited and saved, but opening Kate (or
    another GUI editor) from the menu won't.

    >>> The initrd and vmlinuz modules are all marked with the same build
    >>> numbers. However they do not occupy much space at all maybe 50 megs for
    >>> 4 successive build updates. If you're scrimping for 50 megs you should
    >>> upgrade your storage.

    >>
    >> Some people use a small partition for /boot. In any case, keeping obsolete
    >> kernels, which have perhaps been updated because of security holes, may
    >> not be a good idea.

    >
    > Not an issue if the kernel isn't being used.


    It could be an issue if somebody accidentally scrolls down the boot
    menu too far.

    As others have said, keeping a kernel that works is a good idea, but
    not if that kernel has unpatched vulnerabilities.

    > However I guess I might be
    > giving too broad of a credit in the savvy department and I probably should
    > realize that some n00bs actually read this group.


    In this case, I think that somebody who was experienced enough to
    benefit from the advanced answer would already know it, and telling a
    "n00b" to rm a bunch of files as root is probably *not* a good idea.

    --
    PJR :-)



  19. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    Jim Cochrane illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:

    >
    > [Damn - I've killfiled Dan C, but I keep seeing his messages anyway
    > because people keep replying to him. Maybe I should just killfile
    > everybody ;-) ]


    I cannot believe that everyone killfiles him. His razor sharp whit and
    repartee make me smile.

    Sometimes people take things too personally. Dan C is hilarious. You
    just have to read between the lines.

    I have a game I play. Count the DanC catchphrases in his posts. When
    he includes them all, I feel duty bound to voice my approval.

    Did that make sense? Who ties your shoelaces in the morning? Bugger
    off Windroid, n00b.
    ;-)

    --
    Moog

    “Are you going to come quietly, or do I have to use earplugs?”

  20. Re: Clean up old kernels in ubuntu

    dennis@home illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >
    >
    > "Moog" wrote in message
    > news:6bqribF3d7m06U1@mid.individual.net...
    >> johnny bobby bee illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>> Moog wrote:
    >>>> No problem. It beats the hell out of b0rking the klack out of your
    >>>> menu.list
    >>>> using nano from within single user mode. ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Nano? Weak!
    >>>

    >>
    >> I do use vim, but is it installed by default?
    >>
    >> I mentioned Nano for the benefit of the n00bs. ;-)

    >
    > I've had to use nano to get Ubuntu to install before now. ;-)


    See. Told yer!
    ;-)

    --
    Moog

    “Are you going to come quietly, or do I have to use earplugs?”

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