Ubuntu partitioning - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Ubuntu partitioning - Ubuntu ; New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived ...

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Thread: Ubuntu partitioning

  1. Ubuntu partitioning

    New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    point to a website with info?

  2. Re: Ubuntu partitioning

    Airman Thunderbird schreef:
    > New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    > need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    > can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    > point to a website with info?


    As an example I'll use my laptop's 160GB drive.

    Start with defragging your disk from Windows, not absolutely necessary
    but it doesn't hurt.

    I used the Gparted Live CD to partition before installing Kubuntu but
    this works as well with the (K)Ubuntu disks as part of the manual
    install option.

    First I reduced the C-drive to 60GB, please be aware that outside of
    Microsoft this disk is known as hda (or sda in most newer Linux distro's).
    Because you now have two partitions they are called hda1 and hda2.

    Next you split this new and empty 100GB hda2 partition into what is
    needed for the Linux install.

    100MB is sufficient for the /boot partition (hda2).
    Then 2GB as swap (hda3)
    And the remainder as root partition or / (hda4)

    In case you want a separate /home partition you'd probably reserve about
    15-20GB for root (/) and the rest as /home (hda5)

    As said, I did this as a separate operation using the Gparted Live CD
    and there's a good chance your hard disk will be seen as sda instead of hda.
    The amount of space used for system files in root (/) depends a lot on
    how much software you want to install and is hard to predict, that's why
    I don't bother with a separate /home partition.
    When I reinstall I just back up my /home folder to an external USB drive
    and after the initial reinstall I copy the interesting bits back.

    And please note these days you can access the Linux partitions from
    within Windows (using ext2ifs) and the Windows partition from within
    Linux (ntfs-3g).

  3. Re: Ubuntu partitioning

    Airman Thunderbird illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    > need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    > can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    > point to a website with info?


    Certainly
    https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/switchi...titioning-dual

    HTH.

    --
    Moog

    "The G is for the gnarled face of someone who's on ninety thousand
    pounds a week who reckoned he should have had a throw in"

  4. Re: Ubuntu partitioning


    "Dirk T. Verbeek" wrote in message
    news:48269a83$0$14342$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
    > Airman Thunderbird schreef:
    >> New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    >> need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    >> can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    >> point to a website with info?

    >
    > As an example I'll use my laptop's 160GB drive.
    >
    > Start with defragging your disk from Windows, not absolutely necessary but
    > it doesn't hurt.
    >
    > I used the Gparted Live CD to partition before installing Kubuntu but this
    > works as well with the (K)Ubuntu disks as part of the manual install
    > option.
    >
    > First I reduced the C-drive to 60GB, please be aware that outside of
    > Microsoft this disk is known as hda (or sda in most newer Linux distro's).
    > Because you now have two partitions they are called hda1 and hda2.
    >
    > Next you split this new and empty 100GB hda2 partition into what is needed
    > for the Linux install.
    >
    > 100MB is sufficient for the /boot partition (hda2).
    > Then 2GB as swap (hda3)
    > And the remainder as root partition or / (hda4)
    >
    > In case you want a separate /home partition you'd probably reserve about
    > 15-20GB for root (/) and the rest as /home (hda5)
    >
    > As said, I did this as a separate operation using the Gparted Live CD and
    > there's a good chance your hard disk will be seen as sda instead of hda.
    > The amount of space used for system files in root (/) depends a lot on how
    > much software you want to install and is hard to predict, that's why I
    > don't bother with a separate /home partition.
    > When I reinstall I just back up my /home folder to an external USB drive
    > and after the initial reinstall I copy the interesting bits back.
    >
    > And please note these days you can access the Linux partitions from within
    > Windows (using ext2ifs) and the Windows partition from within Linux
    > (ntfs-3g).


    Hi Dirk,
    I see you are recommending making a separate /boot partition. I've never
    done this myself so could you tell me what's the advantage. Multi-booting?
    BTW a very clear set of instructions for any noob.
    Cheers
    Dave



  5. Re: Ubuntu partitioning

    On Sat, 10 May 2008 18:18:05 -0500, Airman Thunderbird wrote:

    > New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    > need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    > can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    > point to a website with info?


    You could boot with the live CD and use the guided partitioning GUI to
    resize your NTFS partition and create the / ext3 and swap partition.

    About the only thing to know if you chose manual GUI is that / is where
    the install goes and make the swap partition twice what your ram is.



  6. Re: Ubuntu partitioning

    davesurrey schreef:
    > "Dirk T. Verbeek" wrote in message
    > news:48269a83$0$14342$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
    >> Airman Thunderbird schreef:
    >>> New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    >>> need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    >>> can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    >>> point to a website with info?

    >> As an example I'll use my laptop's 160GB drive.
    >>
    >> Start with defragging your disk from Windows, not absolutely necessary but
    >> it doesn't hurt.
    >>
    >> I used the Gparted Live CD to partition before installing Kubuntu but this
    >> works as well with the (K)Ubuntu disks as part of the manual install
    >> option.
    >>
    >> First I reduced the C-drive to 60GB, please be aware that outside of
    >> Microsoft this disk is known as hda (or sda in most newer Linux distro's).
    >> Because you now have two partitions they are called hda1 and hda2.
    >>
    >> Next you split this new and empty 100GB hda2 partition into what is needed
    >> for the Linux install.
    >>
    >> 100MB is sufficient for the /boot partition (hda2).
    >> Then 2GB as swap (hda3)
    >> And the remainder as root partition or / (hda4)
    >>
    >> In case you want a separate /home partition you'd probably reserve about
    >> 15-20GB for root (/) and the rest as /home (hda5)
    >>
    >> As said, I did this as a separate operation using the Gparted Live CD and
    >> there's a good chance your hard disk will be seen as sda instead of hda.
    >> The amount of space used for system files in root (/) depends a lot on how
    >> much software you want to install and is hard to predict, that's why I
    >> don't bother with a separate /home partition.
    >> When I reinstall I just back up my /home folder to an external USB drive
    >> and after the initial reinstall I copy the interesting bits back.
    >>
    >> And please note these days you can access the Linux partitions from within
    >> Windows (using ext2ifs) and the Windows partition from within Linux
    >> (ntfs-3g).

    >
    > Hi Dirk,
    > I see you are recommending making a separate /boot partition. I've never
    > done this myself so could you tell me what's the advantage. Multi-booting?
    > BTW a very clear set of instructions for any noob.
    > Cheers
    > Dave
    >
    >

    When experimenting it is not unusual things muck up the root partition.
    As fsck should be done on an unmounted partition, this set up can boot
    without mounting the root.

    Well that's my reason, whether it's correct I'm not 100% sure but it
    works

  7. Re: Ubuntu partitioning


    "Dirk T. Verbeek" wrote in message
    news:48274813$0$14349$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
    > davesurrey schreef:
    >> "Dirk T. Verbeek" wrote in message
    >> news:48269a83$0$14342$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
    >>> Airman Thunderbird schreef:
    >>>> New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    >>>> need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron,
    >>>> but can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms,
    >>>> or point to a website with info?
    >>> As an example I'll use my laptop's 160GB drive.
    >>>
    >>> Start with defragging your disk from Windows, not absolutely necessary
    >>> but it doesn't hurt.
    >>>
    >>> I used the Gparted Live CD to partition before installing Kubuntu but
    >>> this works as well with the (K)Ubuntu disks as part of the manual
    >>> install option.
    >>>
    >>> First I reduced the C-drive to 60GB, please be aware that outside of
    >>> Microsoft this disk is known as hda (or sda in most newer Linux
    >>> distro's).
    >>> Because you now have two partitions they are called hda1 and hda2.
    >>>
    >>> Next you split this new and empty 100GB hda2 partition into what is
    >>> needed for the Linux install.
    >>>
    >>> 100MB is sufficient for the /boot partition (hda2).
    >>> Then 2GB as swap (hda3)
    >>> And the remainder as root partition or / (hda4)
    >>>
    >>> In case you want a separate /home partition you'd probably reserve about
    >>> 15-20GB for root (/) and the rest as /home (hda5)
    >>>
    >>> As said, I did this as a separate operation using the Gparted Live CD
    >>> and there's a good chance your hard disk will be seen as sda instead of
    >>> hda.
    >>> The amount of space used for system files in root (/) depends a lot on
    >>> how much software you want to install and is hard to predict, that's why
    >>> I don't bother with a separate /home partition.
    >>> When I reinstall I just back up my /home folder to an external USB drive
    >>> and after the initial reinstall I copy the interesting bits back.
    >>>
    >>> And please note these days you can access the Linux partitions from
    >>> within Windows (using ext2ifs) and the Windows partition from within
    >>> Linux (ntfs-3g).

    >>
    >> Hi Dirk,
    >> I see you are recommending making a separate /boot partition. I've never
    >> done this myself so could you tell me what's the advantage.
    >> Multi-booting?
    >> BTW a very clear set of instructions for any noob.
    >> Cheers
    >> Dave

    > When experimenting it is not unusual things muck up the root partition.
    > As fsck should be done on an unmounted partition, this set up can boot
    > without mounting the root.
    >
    > Well that's my reason, whether it's correct I'm not 100% sure but it works
    >


    Thanks Dirk,
    I guess that could be very useful. Just surprised that I've never seen
    anyone else mention it. Smart idea.
    I certainly bow to your better judgement.
    Cheers
    Dave



  8. Re: Ubuntu partitioning

    On Sat, 10 May 2008 18:18:05 -0500, Airman Thunderbird
    wrote:

    >New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    >need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    >can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    >point to a website with info?


    Check out the How-To dual boot video on Ubuntu screencasts.



    Roy Strachan - Registered Linux User 469226

  9. Re: Ubuntu partitioning

    Thanks, got it working, but display problems with a Dell laptop was a
    deal-killer.

    Roy Strachan wrote:
    > On Sat, 10 May 2008 18:18:05 -0500, Airman Thunderbird
    > wrote:
    >
    >> New to Linux, so bear with me. I have one hard drive on my laptop, and
    >> need to keep my XP install. Tried to use the partition GUI in Heron, but
    >> can't figure it out. Can someone explain in linux-deprived terms, or
    >> point to a website with info?

    >
    > Check out the How-To dual boot video on Ubuntu screencasts.
    >
    >
    >
    > Roy Strachan - Registered Linux User 469226


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