[8.04 LTS] - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on [8.04 LTS] - Ubuntu ; John F. Morse wrote: > AV3 wrote: > >> My only complaint after upgrading on a Mac-installed Ubuntu 7.10 >> upgraded to 8.04 was loss of my language and keyboard settings, easily >> remedied. Of course, I haven't had time ...

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Thread: [8.04 LTS]

  1. Re: 8.04 on a Mac

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > AV3 wrote:
    >
    >> My only complaint after upgrading on a Mac-installed Ubuntu 7.10
    >> upgraded to 8.04 was loss of my language and keyboard settings, easily
    >> remedied. Of course, I haven't had time to test and try everything.

    >
    > I tried the LiveCD of xubuntu-6.06.1-desktop-powerpc on an old 350 MHz
    > Slot-Loading G3 iMac. I watched the OS boot process, but when it got to
    > the GUI desktop environment stage, it went dark. I did have the six TTY
    > consoles available.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > Now I see your message, so couldn't resist.
    >
    > What Mac do you have, and are you using any kernel cheats or xorg.conf
    > changes?
    >
    >



    I successfully booted up into the live CD Ubuntu 6.06 for MacPPC on my
    old PPC PowerBook G4, but I was unable to install Ubuntu into a
    partition of a peripheral storage disc as I intended, so I just played
    around with it for familiarization. My current Intel MacBook Pro running
    various versions of Mac OS up to 10.4.11 has hard disc room for
    installed Ubuntu 7.10 via Boot Camp, which as mentioned above was
    successfully just upgraded to 8.04. The MacBook Pro requires no cheats.
    It is just short of one year old. I don't use Parallels or VM, as I find
    booting up with BootChamp pretty fast.


    As a Mac user, I was amazed that one can boot up into the OS on a live
    CD, which I supposed to be just a plain old install disc. I may be naive
    about this, but I think it needs to be more explicitly advertised and
    explained for the benefit of outsiders.


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  2. Re: [8.04 LTS]

    quoting Donald Calloway, [27.04.2008 18:30 +0200]:

    > I upgraded my system to Ubuntu 8.04 LTS this morning and all went extremely well. No
    > hardware issues.


    same her

    > All my old settings were untouched.


    not for me

    I was prompted for overwriting/replacing my configs for samba, login
    crontab and nntp but this was no issue at all

    Much more irritation are caused by the xfs-Warnings and i have no idea
    how to cure ...

    Andreas




  3. Re: [8.04 LTS]

    Andreas Hirsch wrote:
    > quoting Donald Calloway, [27.04.2008 18:30 +0200]:
    >
    >> I upgraded my system to Ubuntu 8.04 LTS this morning and all went extremely well. No
    >> hardware issues.
    >>

    >
    > same her
    >
    >> All my old settings were untouched.
    >>

    >
    > not for me
    >
    > I was prompted for overwriting/replacing my configs for samba, login
    > crontab and nntp but this was no issue at all
    >
    > Much more irritation are caused by the xfs-Warnings and i have no idea
    > how to cure ...
    >
    > Andreas



    The only suggestion I could make to the Canonical team would be to add
    an option at the beginning of the upgrade process to check so you won't
    need to babysit the upgrade.

    Most people wouldn't want their custom config files overwritten, and
    most people remember the multiple Windows and Mac nags that drove them nuts!

    I prefer to start the upgrade then "get a life" even if it is going to
    bed. I don't want to wake up to find the upgrade stuck at step 31 of
    2800, waiting on some user input for a default.

    In the past I have been known to lay a stapler on the Enter key, then
    vacating the room. ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  4. Re: [8.04 LTS]

    On 2008-04-26, johnny bobby bee wrote:
    > I_Am_The_Walrus wrote:
    >> b) Download the ISO and do a clean install (I have space in one of my
    >> partitions)

    >
    > A clean install doesn't take much longer than an upgrade these days.
    > That way you can always go back to your previously working Gutsy
    > partition if it doesn't work the way you want.
    >
    > On your working Gutsy partition save your package (apps) list:
    > dpkg --get-selections \* > packagelist-name
    >
    > Clean install from iso took me <10 minutes. Booted and checked for
    > upgrade packages (2 minutes). Then to get all the packages from our
    > Gutsy install to Hardy, run:
    > dpkg --set-selections < packagelist-name
    >
    > then:
    > apt-get dselect-upgrade
    >
    > And you've got a clean install with all the packages (apps) you had in
    > Gutsy. All in about an hour.


    You make it sound easy, and I'm assuming you're carrying forward /home,
    but what about the following:

    Each user's crontab?
    -I always imagined these were kept outside of /home. Not sure where, though.
    Root's crontab?
    -I guess this is kept either in /root or somewhere else? /etc?
    Samba settings? Samba passwords?
    -you'd lose /etc/samba/*
    Users/groups?
    -When you just copy forward /home, How does the OS know which permissions
    to assign to legacy users, and which groups they were part of? Would that
    all need recreating?

    It's stuff like the above which makes the upgrade path so appealing.

    --
    -Toby
    Add the word afiduluminag to the subject to circumvent my email filters.

  5. Re: [8.04 LTS]

    On Thu, 01 May 2008 14:00:01 +0100, Toby Newman wrote:
    >
    > You make it sound easy, and I'm assuming you're carrying forward /home,
    > but what about the following:


    And what if your disk died as you read this reply.

    > Each user's crontab?
    > -I always imagined these were kept outside of /home. Not sure where, though.
    > Root's crontab?
    > -I guess this is kept either in /root or somewhere else? /etc?


    Under /var/spool/cron* maybe

    > Samba settings? Samba passwords?
    > -you'd lose /etc/samba/*


    Once you know where things are saved, easy enough to replace.
    I have a script to copy files to be backed up into /bkup
    $ cd /bkup ; ls
    accounts etc local root

    and use mkisofs to create a backup iso of /bkup in /local/spare

    For restore/new installs, I loop back the backup iso, if the backup
    partition is still valid, or insert/mount burnt iso.
    I then run a script which copies files to fn_orig, and
    automagically modifies system files with my changes.

    You either make the computer work for you, or it works you. :-)
    http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/index.html can help with writing scripts.

    > Users/groups?
    > -When you just copy forward /home, How does the OS know which permissions
    > to assign to legacy users, and which groups they were part of? Would that
    > all need recreating?


    Now, that does give a bit of a challenge.

    I have a multi-boot setup where I have /home in each install with links to
    common stuff in /accounts/$USER.
    Each internet activity requiring a password has it's own linux account.

    My solution was to set my user's UID/GID starting at 1500.
    That makes it simple to grep the :15xx users from /etc/passwd and group.
    A little more work to pull their records from *shadow files.

    On new installs, I use cat to append the records back to the files,
    cp -a /etc/skel /home and use chmod -R to set UID/GID as needed.
    So far it works on Suse, Mandriva, PcLinuxos, Fedora, ubuntu and kubuntu.

    ---------------------- user UID/GID save script starts below this line------
    #!/bin/bash
    #************************************************* *****************
    #*
    #* save_1500-saves 15?? uid/gid /etc/passwd,group,gshadow,shadow to /etc/*_1500
    #*
    #* To append/restore results after install
    #* cat /etc/group_1500 >> /etc/group
    #* cat /etc/gshadow_1500 >> /etc/gshadow
    #* cat /etc/passwd_1500 >> /etc/passwd
    #* cat /etc/shadow_1500 >> /etc/shadow
    #*
    #************************************************* *****************
    typeset -i i=o

    _ifs_bkup="${IFS}"

    function ld_ary
    {
    #**********************************************
    #*
    #* ld_ary - load array[] with first name from
    #* each line from /etc/arg1_1500
    #*
    #* End of array[] contains --
    #*
    #**********************************************

    _ary_fn=/etc/${1}_1500

    IFS=":"
    i=0

    while read line ; do
    set -- $line
    array[$i]=$1
    i=$(( $i + 1 ))
    done < $_ary_fn

    array[$i]="--"

    IFS="${_ifs_bkup}"

    } # end ld_ary

    function gen_1500
    {
    #**********************************************
    #*
    #* gen_1500 - generate /etc/arg1_1500.
    #*
    #* reads /etc/arg1 file and any lines starting with
    #* a name found in array[] are written to
    #* /etc/arg1_1500 with the supplied arg2 perm.
    #*
    #**********************************************

    _in_fn=/etc/$1
    _out_fn=/etc/${1}_1500

    /bin/cp /dev/null $_out_fn
    chmod $2 $_out_fn

    while read line ; do
    _parse=$line
    IFS=":"
    set -- $_parse
    IFS="${_ifs_bkup}"
    i=0
    while [ "${array[$i]}" != "--" ] ; do
    if [ "${array[$i]}" = "$1" ] ; then
    echo $line >> $_out_fn
    break
    fi
    i=$(( $i + 1 ))
    done

    done < $_in_fn

    IFS="${_ifs_bkup}"

    } # end gen_1500

    #***********************************
    #*
    #* Main code start here
    #*
    #***********************************

    grep ':15' /etc/group | grep -v ':15:' | sort -n -t ':' --key=3 > /etc/group_1500
    grep ':15' /etc/passwd | grep -v ':15:' | sort -n -t ':' --key=3 > /etc/passwd_1500

    ld_ary group
    gen_1500 gshadow 600

    ld_ary passwd
    gen_1500 shadow 600

    #**************** end save_1500 **********************************

  6. Re: [8.04 LTS]

    Bit Twister wrote:
    > On Thu, 01 May 2008 14:00:01 +0100, Toby Newman wrote:
    > (...)
    > > Users/groups?
    > > -When you just copy forward /home, How does the OS know which permissions
    > > to assign to legacy users, and which groups they were part of? Would that
    > > all need recreating?


    > Now, that does give a bit of a challenge.
    > (......)


    I'm thinking about reusing my old (Dapper) home partition after doing
    a clean install of Hardy.

    If I have only a small number of users, could I manually fix the
    user/group problems mentioned above? What would I need to do? Note
    all usernames, userids and users' groups and passwords and then using
    these when setting up the users on the new install?

    And the first username set up during installation should match the
    previous first username (uid=1000)?

    --
    Niklaus

  7. Re: [8.04 LTS]

    On 02 May 2008 13:15:46 GMT, Niklaus Kuehnis wrote:
    > Bit Twister wrote:
    >> On Thu, 01 May 2008 14:00:01 +0100, Toby Newman wrote:
    >> (...)
    >> > Users/groups?
    >> > -When you just copy forward /home, How does the OS know which permissions
    >> > to assign to legacy users, and which groups they were part of? Would that
    >> > all need recreating?

    >
    >> Now, that does give a bit of a challenge.
    >> (......)

    >
    > I'm thinking about reusing my old (Dapper) home partition after doing
    > a clean install of Hardy.
    >
    > If I have only a small number of users, could I manually fix the
    > user/group problems mentioned above?


    You can, I have. Read the last 4 lines of this reply.
    I'll wait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    > What would I need to do? Note
    > all usernames, userids and users' groups and passwords and then using
    > these when setting up the users on the new install?


    I would make a backup copies.
    cp passwd passwd_works
    cp group group_works

    and start editing away.


    > And the first username set up during installation should match the
    > previous first username (uid=1000)?


    Funny number that 1000. I had modified two different installs of other
    distributions to use 1000 UID/GIDs, then found out Suse starts with
    that number. :-(
    I got to go through the whole process again on three distributions.

    That is why I am running at 1500. On new installs I create the first
    account as "junk" using default UID/GID. After boot, I create "normal".
    junk is where I would test some changes and normal where nothing is
    changed. That way if normal works, I know it is a user problem, not a
    system problem.

    That allows the script to pull all users except junk and normal
    regardless of which distribution, version being used.

    Changing UID/GID of a running user while trying to sudo can be bad news.

    If me, I would create a new user junk and assign a password to root.
    Log out of root and current account.
    Log in as junk.
    su - root


    Now you start playing around with UID/GIDs.
    Save current settings:
    cp passwd passwd_works
    cp group group_works

    I just added 1 to front of each user UID/GID in /etc/passwd
    Before: bittwister:x:500:500:Bit Twister:/home/bittwister:/bin/bash
    After: bittwister:x:1500:1500:Bit Twister:/home/bittwister:/bin/bash

    Same in /etc/group
    Before: bittwister:x:500:document,adm,bittwister,games
    After: bittwister:x:1500:document,adm,bittwister,games

    Next activity is to set current user files to new UID/GIDs.

    Let's say you have users like mom, pop, kid, bank and the junk account.
    They have their own group as bittwister's example shows.

    cd /home
    ls
    bank junk kid mom pop
    chown -R band:bank bank
    chown -R kid:kid kid
    chown -R mom:mom mom
    chown -R popop pop

    Reason junk was skipped was because junk retains the original UID/GID it was
    created with and you happen to be logged in a as junk.

    Now, users may have files in other directories for things like mail,
    cron, at, tmp,.....

    You have to find those files with something like
    cd /
    find -gid 503 > fix.gid

    fix.gid will be a list of directory/files with group value of 503

    You may have to use ls -n and look up old numbers in passwd/group_works.

    You do not modify files in ./proc
    You have to look at each one to see what needs changing.
    Sometime file UID/GID are the same and you can use mom:mom.
    Sometime file UID/GID are NOT the same and you may have to use
    chown or chgrp where needed. Sometimes you can use chown -R mom:mail *

    Now check for old uid owner files.
    find -uid 503 > fix.uid
    You do the above again.
    Now you repeat the process for each old uid/gid.


    --
    The warranty and liability expired as you read this message.
    If the above breaks your system, it's yours and you keep both pieces.
    Practice safe computing. Backup the file before you change it.
    Do a, man command_here or cat command_here, before using it.

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