newby - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on newby - Ubuntu ; I've just started using Ubuntu having setup Hardy Heron on my HP laptop and found it incredibly smooth and easy...it even detected my wireless network which practically had me jumping for joy. An initial thought that getting a wireless mouse ...

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  1. newby

    I've just started using Ubuntu having setup Hardy Heron on my HP laptop and
    found it incredibly smooth and easy...it even detected my wireless network
    which practically had me jumping for joy. An initial thought that getting a
    wireless mouse to work proved wrong as the initial failure must have been a
    fluke. A quick post here prompted me to try again and, viola, my Logitech
    wireless mouse AND keyboard work flawlessly.

    So, I decided to continue the testing and installed HH on my backup desktop,
    also an HP but for whatever reason, I get hung up on the log in. I
    followed some suggestions made here but none worked so, realizing that it
    is, afterall, still in beta, I thought I'd just try the Kubuntu version for
    now and might like it better than the Gnome. After the initial setup,
    which was flawless except for the problem that grub won't load--I was
    prompted to try LILO and it seems to work fine. Anyway, after the restart
    and prompt for all the updates etc, I was prompted to select either KDE or
    KDE4 and, thinking quickly, selected the newer version 4. Everything worked
    just fine and there are no problems BUT I'm wondering if KDE4 is also still
    a beta and/or if it might make for a better evaluation if I used the
    previous released version. Obviously, as I'm testing both gnome (laptop)
    and KDE (desktop) with the plan of picking one or the other when the final
    version of HH is released (well, sometime after that) I wonder if using the
    newer KDE version might not be such a hot idea as I'm already testing the OS
    I know so little about and, perhaps, shouldn't complicate things.

    Any thoughts?

    Much ado about nothing?

    Thanks,
    Tim



  2. Re: GNOME vs KDE

    > version. Obviously, as I'm testing both gnome (laptop) and KDE
    > (desktop) with the plan of picking one or the other when the final
    > version of HH is released (well, sometime after that) I wonder if using
    > the newer KDE version might not be such a hot idea as I'm already
    > testing the OS I know so little about and, perhaps, shouldn't complicate
    > things.


    I barely remember that KDE is a more ambitious project. KDE includes a
    browser and some office applications. GNOME just tries to be a good
    desktop without extra stuff.

    Someone corrects me please.

    --
    @~@ Might, Courage, Vision, SINCERITY.
    / v \ Simplicity is Beauty! May the Force and Farce be with you!
    /( _ )\ (Xubuntu 7.10) Linux 2.6.25
    ^ ^ 20:36:01 up 3:42 0 users load average: 1.00 1.00 1.01
    (CSSA):
    http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_...ub_addressesa/

  3. Re: GNOME vs KDE

    "Man-wai Chang ToDie (33.6k)" wrote in
    news:480b3925$0$90265$14726298@news.sunsite.dk:

    >> version. Obviously, as I'm testing both gnome (laptop) and KDE
    >> (desktop) with the plan of picking one or the other when the final
    >> version of HH is released (well, sometime after that) I wonder if
    >> using the newer KDE version might not be such a hot idea as I'm
    >> already testing the OS I know so little about and, perhaps, shouldn't
    >> complicate things.

    >
    > I barely remember that KDE is a more ambitious project. KDE includes a
    > browser and some office applications. GNOME just tries to be a good
    > desktop without extra stuff.
    >
    > Someone corrects me please.


    No correction necesary. I found that too. I installed Ubuntu (with Gnome)
    and then later added KDE.

    Two things..one...KDE (v3?) was noticibly slower than Gnome....and two...it
    automatically installed all these 'K' apps.....Kthis....Kthat....Kwhatever.

    Lame.


  4. Re: newby

    TS Mathews wrote:

    Ub804>



    > So, I decided to continue the testing and installed HH on my backup
    > desktop, also an HP but for whatever reason, I get hung up on the log
    > in. I followed some suggestions made here but none worked so,
    > realizing that it is, afterall, still in beta, I thought I'd just try
    > the Kubuntu version for now and might like it better than the Gnome.


    DE>

    > BUT I'm wondering if KDE4 is also still a beta and/or
    > if it might make for a better evaluation if I used the previous
    > released version.


    KDE4 is not as completely functional with all kdeapps as is kde3.

    > Any thoughts?


    If you haven't experienced kde3 yet, you should have a session on the
    kub804 which is kde3 instead of 4.

    There's quite a lot of difference between gnome and kde which isn't
    appreciated just by having both of them on the same install.


    --
    Mike Easter


  5. Re: newby



    "Mike Easter" wrote in message
    news:n6Gdnf3BNphbyZbVnZ2dnUVZ_jSdnZ2d@earthlink.co m...
    > TS Mathews wrote:
    >
    > > Ub804>
    >
    >
    >
    >> So, I decided to continue the testing and installed HH on my backup
    >> desktop, also an HP but for whatever reason, I get hung up on the log
    >> in. I followed some suggestions made here but none worked so,
    >> realizing that it is, afterall, still in beta, I thought I'd just try
    >> the Kubuntu version for now and might like it better than the Gnome.

    >
    > > DE>
    >
    >> BUT I'm wondering if KDE4 is also still a beta and/or
    >> if it might make for a better evaluation if I used the previous
    >> released version.

    >
    > KDE4 is not as completely functional with all kdeapps as is kde3.
    >
    >> Any thoughts?

    >
    > If you haven't experienced kde3 yet, you should have a session on the
    > kub804 which is kde3 instead of 4.
    >
    > There's quite a lot of difference between gnome and kde which isn't
    > appreciated just by having both of them on the same install.
    >


    Actually, they're each setup as the one and only OS on two different
    computers. Gnome is on the laptop, KDE on the desktop. I wanted to be
    able to see how each would work without there being any chance of some
    outside influence having an effect on them. From a brief test I had done on
    dual boots when I only had one system, I thought I'd prefer Gnome as it
    seems easier to add programs but either things have gotten simpler or I just
    understand the OS a little better and I've had no problem installing the
    extras I wanted to use with KDE. It could be that I'm wanting to narrow it
    down for no good reason...assuming that, one day, either KDE or Gnome would
    "win" and the other will fade away. The more I think about it, that doesn't
    seem to be the case with Linux as it was in the "old" home computing world
    with Atari, Commodore etc fading away under the MS-DOS onslaught.

    Anyway, while my experiment started as a fluke, I think I actually prefer to
    use the two machines with different installs to better decide AND rather
    than think I've got to get this done, there's really no reason why the
    experiment can't run for weeks or even months. From what I know now, it
    seems the only thing I have to be careful of is mail I download from servers
    to make sure each system has it before it's deleted.



  6. Re: newby

    TS Mathews wrote:
    > I've just started using Ubuntu having setup Hardy Heron on my HP
    > laptop and found it incredibly smooth and easy...it even detected my
    > wireless network which practically had me jumping for joy. An initial
    > thought that getting a wireless mouse to work proved wrong as the
    > initial failure must have been a fluke. A quick post here prompted me
    > to try again and, viola, my Logitech wireless mouse AND keyboard work
    > flawlessly.
    >
    > So, I decided to continue the testing and installed HH on my backup
    > desktop, also an HP but for whatever reason, I get hung up on the log
    > in. I followed some suggestions made here but none worked so,
    > realizing that it is, afterall, still in beta, I thought I'd just try
    > the Kubuntu version for now and might like it better than the Gnome.
    > After the initial setup, which was flawless except for the problem
    > that grub won't load--I was prompted to try LILO and it seems to work
    > fine. Anyway, after the restart and prompt for all the updates etc, I
    > was prompted to select either KDE or KDE4 and, thinking quickly,
    > selected the newer version 4. Everything worked just fine and there
    > are no problems BUT I'm wondering if KDE4 is also still a beta and/or
    > if it might make for a better evaluation if I used the previous
    > released version. Obviously, as I'm testing both gnome (laptop) and
    > KDE (desktop) with the plan of picking one or the other when the final
    > version of HH is released (well, sometime after that) I wonder if
    > using the newer KDE version might not be such a hot idea as I'm
    > already testing the OS I know so little about and, perhaps, shouldn't
    > complicate things.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > Much ado about nothing?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Tim



    Hot off the top of my head....

    Others have mentioned that KDE is a Windows look-alike. Well, I don't
    think anything can be THAT bad. But it does resemble the Windows thought
    process more than GNOME.

    I use a few Ubuntu distros, which of course come with GNOME as the
    standard DE. Over the years I've added KDE to one or two just for a
    "look-see." Plus I do use several of the "k"-named programs under GNOME,
    such as KLibido, digiKam, Konqueror, KNotes, KCalc, Kate, KHexEdit,
    KGpg, KNode, .... Actually quite a few more.

    I also prefer Debian, which is GNOME as default. I use the same logic as
    above with the Ubuntu installs.

    I do have KDE as the default on some of my other distros, like Knoppix,
    Linspire, Mandrake, Slackware, .... I can't remember them all, but like
    owning a fleet of different cars, I just sit down and use them. I feel
    no learning curve when moving around, even amongst Windows 3.1, 95, 98
    and XP, nor within the Mac System 7, 9 and OS-X OSes. Or CDE,
    Enlightenment, Fluxbox, IceWM, JWM, Xfce, ....

    I've learned two truths about computers, starting with my "Red Book"
    Apple ][ in 1977: Tell the computer what you want to work on, and what
    you want to do with it. Select and command.

    Everything else is eye candy, glitz, and your ability to find what you
    want to select. These items are all your personal preferences and abilities.

    If you don't want complication, then GNOME would be my suggestion over KDE.

    Even better, you could learn the BASH commands, use the CLI, and have
    total control. That will come later though. ;-)

    The real answer is to try them all yourself and see which you like.
    Install several if you have the disk space. There is no hurry, take your
    time and explore them.

    After all, this is a Unix-like OS, and unlike Windows (and the Mac), you
    are not stuck using what Bill Gates (and Steve Jobs) thinks is best for
    you. You are free. Never forget that!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desktop_environment


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  7. Re: newby

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 15:33:59 +0000, TS Mathews wrote:

    > reason why the experiment can't run for weeks or even months. From what
    > I know now, it seems the only thing I have to be careful of is mail I
    > download from servers to make sure each system has it before it's
    > deleted.


    Two ways round this (all too common) 'problem'.

    1. If your ISP supports it, switch to IMAP - it's much better than POP
    anyway and your ISP (which does more regular backups than you) can store
    your mail for you.

    2. If you /must/ use POP then set all your email clients on all your
    machines to leave the messages on the server.

  8. Re: newby

    TS Mathews wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"


    >> If you haven't experienced kde3 yet, you should have a session on the
    >> kub804 which is kde3 instead of 4.
    >>
    >> There's quite a lot of difference between gnome and kde which isn't
    >> appreciated just by having both of them on the same install.


    Here I was referring to the advice that some are often given about
    putting gnome & kde into the same install, such as How to install KDE on
    Ubuntu http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/kde and How to install Ubuntu on
    top of Kubuntu http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/gnome

    > Actually, they're each setup as the one and only OS on two different
    > computers. Gnome is on the laptop, KDE on the desktop.


    I understand.

    > From what I know now, it seems the only thing I have to be
    > careful of is mail I download from servers to make sure each system
    > has it before it's deleted.


    Have you investigated using IMAP instead of POP?

    --
    Mike Easter


  9. Re: newby



    "Mike Easter" wrote in message
    news:lYednVBFKM7z-pbVnZ2dnUVZ_uGdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
    > TS Mathews wrote:
    >> "Mike Easter"

    >
    >>> If you haven't experienced kde3 yet, you should have a session on the
    >>> kub804 which is kde3 instead of 4.
    >>>
    >>> There's quite a lot of difference between gnome and kde which isn't
    >>> appreciated just by having both of them on the same install.

    >
    > Here I was referring to the advice that some are often given about
    > putting gnome & kde into the same install, such as How to install KDE on
    > Ubuntu http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/kde and How to install Ubuntu on
    > top of Kubuntu http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/gnome
    >
    >> Actually, they're each setup as the one and only OS on two different
    >> computers. Gnome is on the laptop, KDE on the desktop.

    >
    > I understand.
    >
    >> From what I know now, it seems the only thing I have to be
    >> careful of is mail I download from servers to make sure each system
    >> has it before it's deleted.

    >
    > Have you investigated using IMAP instead of POP?
    >


    Two people have suggested that so, I guess, it's time I get off my duff and
    stop wondering exactly what IMAP is, Google it, learn how to use it and get
    going.



  10. Re: newby

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 17:51:45 +0000, TS Mathews wrote:


    >> Have you investigated using IMAP instead of POP?
    >>
    >>

    > Two people have suggested that so, I guess, it's time I get off my duff
    > and stop wondering exactly what IMAP is, Google it, learn how to use it
    > and get going.


    Basically it's a protocol for managing you mail ON THE ISP's SERVER. Move
    something on your machine and it moves on the server. You never have to
    download your mail, unless you want to save a local copy. Create a sub-
    folder to your inbox locally and it's created on the server, delete a
    message locally and it's deleted on the server etc. etc. etc.
    In Thunderbird )for example) a new mail account can be POP or IMAP - you
    select with radio buttons. BUT your MSP has to support it. Mine is
    imap.spamcop.net. You don't have to learn to use it: if your MSP supports
    it it's just like any other mail account, you just continue using your
    favourite email client.

  11. Re: newby

    TS Mathews wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"
    >> TS Mathews wrote:


    >>> From what I know now, it seems the only thing I have to be
    >>> careful of is mail I download from servers to make sure each system
    >>> has it before it's deleted.

    >>
    >> Have you investigated using IMAP instead of POP?
    >>

    >
    > Two people have suggested that so, I guess, it's time I get off my
    > duff and stop wondering exactly what IMAP is, Google it, learn how to
    > use it and get going.


    Since you are still posting here with a Win newsreader, I can't tell
    what MUA you are using with your Ub or Kub install, but such as Tbird
    and others will handle IMAP. If you are talking about using your
    connectivity provider's eastlink.ca mailbox, I think they don't offer
    IMAP access.

    If you want to experiment with IMAP, gmail would be handy or a
    possibility to use, since it is free, and not only offers webmail, but
    also pop & imap.


    --
    Mike Easter


  12. Re: newby



    "Mike Easter" wrote in message
    news:hbSdnRBLW7M2DpbVnZ2dnUVZ_sednZ2d@earthlink.co m...
    > TS Mathews wrote:
    >> "Mike Easter"
    >>> TS Mathews wrote:

    >
    >>>> From what I know now, it seems the only thing I have to be
    >>>> careful of is mail I download from servers to make sure each system
    >>>> has it before it's deleted.
    >>>
    >>> Have you investigated using IMAP instead of POP?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Two people have suggested that so, I guess, it's time I get off my
    >> duff and stop wondering exactly what IMAP is, Google it, learn how to
    >> use it and get going.

    >
    > Since you are still posting here with a Win newsreader, I can't tell
    > what MUA you are using with your Ub or Kub install, but such as Tbird
    > and others will handle IMAP. If you are talking about using your
    > connectivity provider's eastlink.ca mailbox, I think they don't offer
    > IMAP access.
    >
    > If you want to experiment with IMAP, gmail would be handy or a
    > possibility to use, since it is free, and not only offers webmail, but
    > also pop & imap.
    >

    Yeah, I haven't setup my mail program on either Linux machine yet but even
    if I had, I'd rather test the IMAP setup here as I know how my MS stuff
    works. I'm curious, using Gmail as a pop doesn't seem any different from
    the IMAP setup other than the fact that I don't actually see the various
    folders (yeah, I know they're not called folders in Gmail but I've forgotten
    what to call them) and I have to go online to delete things from the inbox.

    For now, I've used the IMAP setup for an aol account and done a little
    mail today and will begin moving the hotmail account as well. Then I'll
    pick an e-mail program or two for testing on the Linux systems. As I know a
    little bit about Thunderbird, I'll certainly try it but I know nothing about
    some of the others people have mentioned here. My guess is, it'll be
    Thunderbird as I know version 3.0 will be adding a calendar and I like the
    idea of integrating calendar, e-mail and news into one program.

    Thanks again for the help.



  13. Re: newby

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 20:45:42 +0000, TS Mathews wrote:

    As I know a little bit about Thunderbird, I'll certainly try
    > it but I know nothing about some of the others people have mentioned
    > here. My guess is, it'll be Thunderbird as I know version 3.0 will be
    > adding a calendar and I like the idea of integrating calendar, e-mail
    > and news into one program.
    >
    > Thanks again for the help.


    You are very welcome! in all senses.

  14. Re: newby

    TS Mathews wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Mike Easter" wrote in message
    > news:hbSdnRBLW7M2DpbVnZ2dnUVZ_sednZ2d@earthlink.co m...
    >> TS Mathews wrote:
    >>> "Mike Easter"
    >>>> TS Mathews wrote:

    >>
    >>>>> From what I know now, it seems the only thing I have to be
    >>>>> careful of is mail I download from servers to make sure each system
    >>>>> has it before it's deleted.
    >>>>
    >>>> Have you investigated using IMAP instead of POP?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Two people have suggested that so, I guess, it's time I get off my
    >>> duff and stop wondering exactly what IMAP is, Google it, learn how to
    >>> use it and get going.

    >>
    >> Since you are still posting here with a Win newsreader, I can't tell
    >> what MUA you are using with your Ub or Kub install, but such as Tbird
    >> and others will handle IMAP. If you are talking about using your
    >> connectivity provider's eastlink.ca mailbox, I think they don't offer
    >> IMAP access.
    >>
    >> If you want to experiment with IMAP, gmail would be handy or a
    >> possibility to use, since it is free, and not only offers webmail, but
    >> also pop & imap.
    >>

    > Yeah, I haven't setup my mail program on either Linux machine yet but
    > even if I had, I'd rather test the IMAP setup here as I know how my MS
    > stuff works. I'm curious, using Gmail as a pop doesn't seem any
    > different from the IMAP setup other than the fact that I don't actually
    > see the various folders (yeah, I know they're not called folders in
    > Gmail but I've forgotten what to call them) and I have to go online to
    > delete things from the inbox.
    >
    > For now, I've used the IMAP setup for an aol account and done a
    > little mail today and will begin moving the hotmail account as well.
    > Then I'll pick an e-mail program or two for testing on the Linux
    > systems. As I know a little bit about Thunderbird, I'll certainly try
    > it but I know nothing about some of the others people have mentioned
    > here. My guess is, it'll be Thunderbird as I know version 3.0 will be
    > adding a calendar and I like the idea of integrating calendar, e-mail
    > and news into one program.
    >
    > Thanks again for the help.
    >
    >

    As you can see, I've installed Thunderbird on my Vista system and set it
    up much as I'd been using Windows Live Mail and everything seems to be
    working. As I was able to import both my contacts and my messages, I
    hoped I could dave these files, move them to a flash card and copy them
    to my Linux systems when I setup Thunderbird on them but I'm at a loss
    to find the files. I looked in documents and settings as well as all
    the subdirectories off of the installed Thunderbird in my Program
    files." By any chance can any of you clue me in as to where Thunderbird
    puts it's files--meaning the contact/address book and messages--in the
    Microsoft environment.

    I think, after this step, I may be able to operate completely in the
    Linux world. Of course, coward that I am, I'll leave this system alone
    until I've used Linux on the other two for a few weeks and feel pretty
    confident that I'm done with Billy G and his crowd.

    Thanks,
    Tim

  15. Re: newby

    On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 00:09:36 GMT, Tim Mathews
    wrote:

    >TS Mathews wrote:
    >As you can see, I've installed Thunderbird on my Vista system and set it
    >up much as I'd been using Windows Live Mail and everything seems to be
    >working. As I was able to import both my contacts and my messages, I
    >hoped I could dave these files, move them to a flash card and copy them
    >to my Linux systems when I setup Thunderbird on them but I'm at a loss
    >to find the files. I looked in documents and settings as well as all
    >the subdirectories off of the installed Thunderbird in my Program
    >files." By any chance can any of you clue me in as to where Thunderbird
    >puts it's files--meaning the contact/address book and messages--in the
    >Microsoft environment.
    >Thanks,
    >Tim


    I don't use Thunderbird any more. I find Agent to be irreplaceable for
    newsgroups, and gmail is my email client. I intend to run Agent in Linux
    using Wine. Having said that:

    Most of my configs and such in Vista are in
    /users/Barry/appdata/roaming. Vista doesn't use Documents and Settings,
    and gives misleading error messages when you try to access your data
    from there.

    Does this help?

    Barry
    Barry Jones

  16. Re: newby

    Tim Mathews wrote:
    > TS Mathews wrote:
    >> Yeah, I haven't setup my mail program on either Linux machine yet but
    >> even if I had, I'd rather test the IMAP setup here as I know how my
    >> MS stuff works. I'm curious, using Gmail as a pop doesn't seem any
    >> different from the IMAP setup other than the fact that I don't
    >> actually see the various folders (yeah, I know they're not called
    >> folders in Gmail but I've forgotten what to call them) and I have to
    >> go online to delete things from the inbox.
    >>
    >> For now, I've used the IMAP setup for an aol account and done a
    >> little mail today and will begin moving the hotmail account as well.
    >> Then I'll pick an e-mail program or two for testing on the Linux
    >> systems. As I know a little bit about Thunderbird, I'll certainly
    >> try it but I know nothing about some of the others people have
    >> mentioned here. My guess is, it'll be Thunderbird as I know version
    >> 3.0 will be adding a calendar and I like the idea of integrating
    >> calendar, e-mail and news into one program.
    >>
    >> Thanks again for the help.



    There is a program called Evolution (it's the default e-mail program for
    GNOME if I remember correctly), which is a similar program to Microsoft
    Outlook (not Outlook Eggspress). It has a calender, appointment book,
    etc., like Outlook, but unlike Outlook, Evolution can do NNTP news as well.

    Some people swear by it, and others naturally swear at it. You will need
    to explore it and see if it does what you want.

    Personally, I use the calender and appointment portion, but only use the
    mail and news clients for testing.

    For mail and news, Thunderbird is my usual application, with Pan and a
    few others used from time to time for news. Thunderbird is not great,
    but it and the other Mozilla/Netscape clients have been used for years,
    and I have a lot of messages archived in various directories (folders).

    IMHO, most any news client is better than Thunderbird on USENET, because
    it can't filter worth a hoot. If archived messages are not a concern,
    then I'd suggest Pan, KNode or Sylpheed-Claws for a GUI reader, or if
    you want to learn a CLI client, then slrn is probably at the top of the
    list of many CLI readers.


    > As you can see, I've installed Thunderbird on my Vista system and set
    > it up much as I'd been using Windows Live Mail and everything seems to
    > be working. As I was able to import both my contacts and my messages,
    > I hoped I could dave these files, move them to a flash card and copy
    > them to my Linux systems when I setup Thunderbird on them but I'm at a
    > loss to find the files. I looked in documents and settings as well as
    > all the subdirectories off of the installed Thunderbird in my Program
    > files." By any chance can any of you clue me in as to where
    > Thunderbird puts it's files--meaning the contact/address book and
    > messages--in the Microsoft environment.



    Look in your Account Settings under the Server Settings, and see what
    pathname is used in the "Local directory" box at the bottom.

    This is the location for XP Home and Pro. Vista might be different.

    Well, Vista is different, but you know what I mean. ;-)


    > I think, after this step, I may be able to operate completely in the
    > Linux world. Of course, coward that I am, I'll leave this system
    > alone until I've used Linux on the other two for a few weeks and feel
    > pretty confident that I'm done with Billy G and his crowd.



    If you no longer need any Windows programs, then you can easily rid
    yourself of the OS. However some of us still require Windows for
    employer-related work, or a rare program with no Linux equivalent. In my
    case it is AutoCAD, whose files clients demand. I no longer have
    clients, but I do have a lot of my own drawings, so I keep one Windows
    box around just in case.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  17. Re: newby

    John F. Morse wrote:

    > Evolution
    > can do NNTP news as well.


    Not very well from my experience so far.



    --
    Mike Easter

  18. Re: newby

    Mike Easter wrote:
    > John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >> Evolution
    >> can do NNTP news as well.
    >>

    >
    > Not very well from my experience so far.



    You forgot the next sentence:

    "Some people swear by it, and others naturally swear at it." ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  19. Re: newby

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > Tim Mathews wrote:
    >> TS Mathews wrote:
    >>> Yeah, I haven't setup my mail program on either Linux machine yet but
    >>> even if I had, I'd rather test the IMAP setup here as I know how my
    >>> MS stuff works. I'm curious, using Gmail as a pop doesn't seem any
    >>> different from the IMAP setup other than the fact that I don't
    >>> actually see the various folders (yeah, I know they're not called
    >>> folders in Gmail but I've forgotten what to call them) and I have to
    >>> go online to delete things from the inbox.
    >>>
    >>> For now, I've used the IMAP setup for an aol account and done a
    >>> little mail today and will begin moving the hotmail account as well.
    >>> Then I'll pick an e-mail program or two for testing on the Linux
    >>> systems. As I know a little bit about Thunderbird, I'll certainly
    >>> try it but I know nothing about some of the others people have
    >>> mentioned here. My guess is, it'll be Thunderbird as I know version
    >>> 3.0 will be adding a calendar and I like the idea of integrating
    >>> calendar, e-mail and news into one program.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks again for the help.

    >
    >
    > There is a program called Evolution (it's the default e-mail program for
    > GNOME if I remember correctly), which is a similar program to Microsoft
    > Outlook (not Outlook Eggspress). It has a calender, appointment book,
    > etc., like Outlook, but unlike Outlook, Evolution can do NNTP news as well.
    >
    > Some people swear by it, and others naturally swear at it. You will need
    > to explore it and see if it does what you want.
    >
    > Personally, I use the calender and appointment portion, but only use the
    > mail and news clients for testing.
    >
    > For mail and news, Thunderbird is my usual application, with Pan and a
    > few others used from time to time for news. Thunderbird is not great,
    > but it and the other Mozilla/Netscape clients have been used for years,
    > and I have a lot of messages archived in various directories (folders).
    >
    > IMHO, most any news client is better than Thunderbird on USENET, because
    > it can't filter worth a hoot. If archived messages are not a concern,
    > then I'd suggest Pan, KNode or Sylpheed-Claws for a GUI reader, or if
    > you want to learn a CLI client, then slrn is probably at the top of the
    > list of many CLI readers.
    >
    >
    >> As you can see, I've installed Thunderbird on my Vista system and set
    >> it up much as I'd been using Windows Live Mail and everything seems to
    >> be working. As I was able to import both my contacts and my messages,
    >> I hoped I could dave these files, move them to a flash card and copy
    >> them to my Linux systems when I setup Thunderbird on them but I'm at a
    >> loss to find the files. I looked in documents and settings as well as
    >> all the subdirectories off of the installed Thunderbird in my Program
    >> files." By any chance can any of you clue me in as to where
    >> Thunderbird puts it's files--meaning the contact/address book and
    >> messages--in the Microsoft environment.

    >
    >
    > Look in your Account Settings under the Server Settings, and see what
    > pathname is used in the "Local directory" box at the bottom.
    >


    Yep, there it is. It hadn't occurred to me (yeah, my IQ is around my
    shoe size on occasion) that the path for the files would be IN
    Thunderbird and easier to find. Of course, I was using Windows Explorer
    and, frankly would NEVER have looked into the file .../roaming

    Sure would like to ask the programmer why that name makes to him/her as
    the path for the data files.

    You also mentioned keeping a Windows box around for certain things you
    need. In my case, I'll just be switching things around and my primary
    desktop which is a Vista machine will become the Linux unit and I'll
    reinstall the factory settings to the backup machine (Windows XP) so
    I'll have something around for anything which might come up requiring
    Windows.

    Again, thanks for the help

  20. Re: newby

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > Mike Easter wrote:
    >> John F. Morse wrote:
    >>
    >>> Evolution
    >>> can do NNTP news as well.

    >>
    >> Not very well from my experience so far.

    >
    >
    > You forgot the next sentence:
    >
    > "Some people swear by it, and others naturally swear at it." ;-)
    >
    >

    I'm gonna give it a try during this learning phase. I can live with a
    shortcoming or two for the convenience of having the one program which
    does all of those things for me. That was why I was so attracted to
    Thunderbird when I heard the next release--well, version 3.0 anyway--was
    going to include a calendar. For now, I'll setup Evolution on one of
    the systems and see how it works.

    Thanks again

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