Open Office spell checker - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Open Office spell checker - Ubuntu ; Yo Dose anyone have trouble with openoffice spell checker? using the word prossesor and the spreadsheet i cant seem to get the spell checker to find anything no matter how badly it is spelt? And help would be great.. Thanks ...

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  1. Open Office spell checker

    Yo

    Dose anyone have trouble with openoffice spell checker? using the word
    prossesor and the spreadsheet i cant seem to get the spell checker to
    find anything no matter how badly it is spelt?

    And help would be great..

    Thanks

    Oz

  2. Re: Open Office spell checker

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 14:34:28 +1000, ozzyla wrote:

    > Yo
    >
    > Dose anyone have trouble with openoffice spell checker? using the word
    > prossesor and the spreadsheet i cant seem to get the spell checker to
    > find anything no matter how badly it is spelt?
    >
    > And help would be great..
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Oz


    You might want to check if your dictionary is installed correctly. Under
    File -> Wizards -> Install dictionaries you can select one to install. I
    had trouble with the wizard so I had to do it by hand. Lots of links if
    you google it. I personally had trouble with the Canadian English
    Dictionary installation. It was using it but it wasn't installed.

    -will

  3. Re: Open Office spell checker

    Will wrote:

    > You might want to check if your dictionary is installed correctly. Under
    > File -> Wizards -> Install dictionaries you can select one to install. I
    > had trouble with the wizard so I had to do it by hand. Lots of links if
    > you google it. I personally had trouble with the Canadian English
    > Dictionary installation. It was using it but it wasn't installed.
    >
    > -will
    >



    Is Canadian English different than American English?

    I never noticed it before, except maybe when listening to Red Green. ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  4. Re: Open Office spell checker



    "John F. Morse" wrote in message
    news:ReIOj.113627$D_3.85046@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > Will wrote:
    >
    >> You might want to check if your dictionary is installed correctly. Under
    >> File -> Wizards -> Install dictionaries you can select one to install. I
    >> had trouble with the wizard so I had to do it by hand. Lots of links if
    >> you google it. I personally had trouble with the Canadian English
    >> Dictionary installation. It was using it but it wasn't installed.
    >>
    >> -will
    >>

    >
    >
    > Is Canadian English different than American English?
    >
    > I never noticed it before, except maybe when listening to Red Green. ;-)
    >

    Yep, marginally so. You say harbor, we say harbour...and that's the main
    difference...a lot of "or" words are "our" up here. Other than that,
    there's not much different. Of course, if we're talking, you say "huh" and
    we say "eh." ha ha



  5. Re: Open Office spell checker

    "John F. Morse" wrote:
    > Will wrote:
    >
    >> You might want to check if your dictionary is installed correctly.
    >> Under File -> Wizards -> Install dictionaries you can select one
    >> to install. I had trouble with the wizard so I had to do it by
    >> hand. Lots of links if you google it. I personally had trouble
    >> with the Canadian English Dictionary installation. It was using
    >> it but it wasn't installed.

    >
    > Is Canadian English different than American English? I never
    > noticed it before, except maybe when listening to Red Green. ;-)


    American doesn't include entries for "foo, toi" etc. :-)

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.

    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. Re: Open Office spell checker

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 14:28:02 +0000, TS Mathews wrote:

    > "John F. Morse" wrote in message


    >>
    >> Is Canadian English different than American English?
    >>
    >> I never noticed it before, except maybe when listening to Red Green.
    >> ;-)
    >>

    > Yep, marginally so. You say harbor, we say harbour...and that's the
    > main difference...a lot of "or" words are "our" up here. Other than
    > that, there's not much different. Of course, if we're talking, you say
    > "huh" and we say "eh." ha ha


    We (Canadians) tend to use the British spellings for words. This dates
    from our first Prime Minister, John A. MacDonald, who decreed that Canada
    shall maintain British spellings in order to maintain uniformity through
    out the British Empire. It's still in effect today and so all government
    documents are supposed to use it, although in everyday usage Americanized
    spellings definitely are used by many.

    As TS mentioned, the most common difference is -or and -our in colour and
    harbour.

    We also tend to use -re instead of -er like in centre and theatre. We do
    however tend not to use the British -ise endings but instead use the -ize
    common in American English. Canadian English also tends to use -ce
    instead of -se as seen in offence/offense and defence/defense.

    And, of course, the ever present "eh". There are many other examples
    but I'm pretty sure no one is going to keep reading.

    Sorry, I'm a Canadian History/Political Studies student with a strong
    background in English and this managed to touch on all three.

    -will


  7. Re: Open Office spell checker

    TS Mathews wrote:
    >
    >
    > "John F. Morse" wrote in message
    > news:ReIOj.113627$D_3.85046@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >> Will wrote:
    >>
    >>> You might want to check if your dictionary is installed correctly.
    >>> Under File -> Wizards -> Install dictionaries you can select one to
    >>> install. I had trouble with the wizard so I had to do it by hand.
    >>> Lots of links if you google it. I personally had trouble with the
    >>> Canadian English Dictionary installation. It was using it but it
    >>> wasn't installed.
    >>>
    >>> -will
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Is Canadian English different than American English?
    >>
    >> I never noticed it before, except maybe when listening to Red Green. ;-)
    >>

    > Yep, marginally so. You say harbor, we say harbour...and that's the
    > main difference...a lot of "or" words are "our" up here. Other than
    > that, there's not much different. Of course, if we're talking, you
    > say "huh" and we say "eh." ha ha



    Yes, I'm well aware of those added "u"s but never knew the reason,
    besides some edict to keep with an old Empire tradition, as Will
    mentions. It just makes "English" sound more "Frenchy," which as you
    know, isn't a favorite thing amongst English-speaking people. ;-)

    I was thinking more along the lines of "petrol," "bonnet," "torch,"
    "lorry" and so on. Or putting commas and periods outside of the closing
    quotes.

    I also notice the BBC ( http://news.bbc.co.uk ) apparently has a style
    to not use all caps in some cases. Like NASA, which is an abbreviation,
    they seem to spell it as it is commonly pronounced (Nasa -- for "nass'-uh").

    They also frequently use "row" for a disagreement. That sometimes
    confuses me when reading headlines, since "row" to me is a line of
    something (usually perpendicular to a column), or using oars in a boat.

    I have little trouble reading British English, so it is no concern but
    often interesting.

    Now, Red Green had a different take on things. I guess his show has
    ended, eh? ;-)

    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  8. Re: Open Office spell checker

    Will wrote:


    > We (Canadians) tend to use the British spellings for words. This dates
    > from our first Prime Minister, John A. MacDonald, who decreed that Canada
    > shall maintain British spellings in order to maintain uniformity through
    > out the British Empire. It's still in effect today and so all government
    > documents are supposed to use it, although in everyday usage Americanized
    > spellings definitely are used by many.
    >
    > As TS mentioned, the most common difference is -or and -our in colour and
    > harbour.
    >
    > We also tend to use -re instead of -er like in centre and theatre. We do
    > however tend not to use the British -ise endings but instead use the -ize
    > common in American English. Canadian English also tends to use -ce
    > instead of -se as seen in offence/offense and defence/defense.
    >
    > And, of course, the ever present "eh". There are many other examples
    > but I'm pretty sure no one is going to keep reading.
    >
    > Sorry, I'm a Canadian History/Political Studies student with a strong
    > background in English and this managed to touch on all three.
    >
    > -will



    No need to feel sorry, Will. That is all good stuff to know, and I thank
    you for taking the time to write.

    You've just piqued me bloody interest, eh. ;-)

    Do you feel the "Americanized" English is stronger in the Western
    Provinces, or more in the Eastern and/or Maritime?

    Or the Yukon, NWT and the new Nunavut? I spent three years in Alaska, so
    I'd bet those are similar. IIRC, Alaska was all American English
    spelling, but there were a lot of natives (Eskimo and Indian), so spoken
    languages varied.

    What about the Quebec area, where French has some heavy use? Isn't it an
    "official" dual-language province? I don't care about the French part,
    but what does this do to English spelling?


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  9. Re: Open Office spell checker


    > They also frequently use "row" for a disagreement. That sometimes
    > confuses me when reading headlines, since "row" to me is a line of
    > something (usually perpendicular to a column), or using oars in a boat.
    >


    Row meaning disagreement rhymes with Plough.

    Row as in boat rhymes with Though.

    With both words common in spoken use over here, we hardly ever have a
    problem with text, even relatively sparse headlines.




  10. OT: Re: Open Office spell checker

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 19:08:59 +0000, John F. Morse wrote:


    > No need to feel sorry, Will. That is all good stuff to know, and I thank
    > you for taking the time to write.
    >
    > You've just piqued me bloody interest, eh. ;-)
    >
    > Do you feel the "Americanized" English is stronger in the Western
    > Provinces, or more in the Eastern and/or Maritime?


    I'm going to sum up everything I wrote below because I got a bit long
    winded: Historically, the West was the most "Americanized". I couldn't
    say for sure now but my guess would be Ontario now.

    Well, being a history major I can speak fairly knowledgeably about the
    language in historical terms but I'm not sure what the stats are as of
    today. Historically, the American influence was strongly felt in the
    western provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) and at several points
    the Canadian gov. felt that American influence was in fact growing too
    strong and American expansion to the north was feared. One of the prime
    reasons for the formation of our transcontinental railroad was in case of
    invasion (troop movement). The formation of the NWMP (now RCMP) was also
    based partly on this fact. Ontario however was a bastion of British
    culture and due to conflicts such as the American Revolution remained
    fairly anti-American for a long time.

    Now however, I'd be hard pressed to say whether one region is more
    Americanized than most. If I was asked to guess, I'd say Ontario would
    be a likely candidate since the majority of the population is so close to
    the border and the urban sprawl is so close. I'm thinking for example
    the Buffalo/Windsor area.

    I've grown up and lived in the west my entire life and I don't really
    notice the differences. We, with accounts made for regional dialects and
    accents, say the word the say way, just spell it differently than in the
    U.S. So of course I notice it when reading but it's more of a sub
    conscious thing. I'm far more likely to notice things like measurements
    (Imperial vs Metric) or cultural references before I notice spelling.

    >
    > Or the Yukon, NWT and the new Nunavut? I spent three years in Alaska, so
    > I'd bet those are similar. IIRC, Alaska was all American English
    > spelling, but there were a lot of natives (Eskimo and Indian), so spoken
    > languages varied.


    Well...I assume Alaska would use American spelling since it's a
    state. The Territories I'm not really sure but based on my best guess
    I would say still use mainly the Canadian/British forms for a couple of
    reasons. One, most of the English they encounter would be to my
    thinking, associated with the government. Statistically most non Inuit
    (proper name for Eskimo) and non Native work for or with the government
    or in teaching positions. Therefore any written materials would follow
    the Canadian English spellings. Also, due to the remoteness I would
    think American influences which we mainly get from American media (TV,
    magazines etc) would be less available.

    >
    > What about the Quebec area, where French has some heavy use? Isn't it an
    > "official" dual-language province? I don't care about the French part,
    > but what does this do to English spelling?


    Quebec is a special case. They're not a dual language province but a
    French province. All signs are in French only and I believe it's
    actually a fine-able offence to post signs in English. Basically the
    only English you'll get in Quebec is if you request it when dealing with
    the Government. Throughout the country by law you can request any
    Government service in either official language. Most large companies
    (ie. Banks) will offer both.

    New Brunswick is a truly dual language province. Historically it was
    also strongly British (many British loyalists from the 13 Colonies
    settled there during the Revolution). PEI and Nova Scotia were also,
    historically speaking fairly strong British and anti-American, again due
    to conflicts such as the war of 1812 and the Revolution.

    Newfoundland....well no one knows wtf they speak.

    I talk too much heh

    -will

  11. Re: Open Office spell checker

    On 2008-04-20, John F. Morse wrote:
    > Will wrote:

    ....
    > Do you feel the "Americanized" English is stronger in the Western
    > Provinces, or more in the Eastern and/or Maritime?


    I see both in use across the country. I set crossword puzzles for
    a newspaper and a magazine. The newspaper, located in Toronto, but
    owned by a Quebec company, uses the English spellings. The
    magazine, headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, uses American
    spellings.

    ....
    > about the Quebec area, where French has some heavy use? Isn't it an
    > "official" dual-language province?


    The only offically bilingual province is New Brunswick.

    --
    Chris F.A. Johnson, author |
    Shell Scripting Recipes: | My code in this post, if any,
    A Problem-Solution Approach | is released under the
    2005, Apress | GNU General Public Licence

  12. Re: Open Office spell checker

    newshound wrote:
    >> They also frequently use "row" for a disagreement. That sometimes
    >> confuses me when reading headlines, since "row" to me is a line of
    >> something (usually perpendicular to a column), or using oars in a boat.
    >>

    >
    > Row meaning disagreement rhymes with Plough.
    >
    > Row as in boat rhymes with Though.
    >
    > With both words common in spoken use over here, we hardly ever have a
    > problem with text, even relatively sparse headlines.
    >
    >
    >

    Eh, I'm learning these things from watching Doctor Who and Torchwood on
    BBC America. The differences are subtle, but if you actually pay
    attention to the show you may find yourself thinking more in "British".
    When someone asks for a 'torch' I now translate it to flashlight in my
    head. I'm part French and Huron (long story), and I do notice that a lot
    of words are derivatives of some other language.

    Just to be 'On topic' I have noticed that the spell checkers on most
    word processor programs have a totally stupid ignorance of computer
    technical terms in any language.

    Cheers,
    Bill Baka

  13. Re: Open Office spell checker

    newshound wrote:
    >> They also frequently use "row" for a disagreement. That sometimes
    >> confuses me when reading headlines, since "row" to me is a line of
    >> something (usually perpendicular to a column), or using oars in a boat.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Row meaning disagreement rhymes with Plough.
    >
    > Row as in boat rhymes with Though.
    >
    > With both words common in spoken use over here, we hardly ever have a
    > problem with text, even relatively sparse headlines.



    I certainly didn't know that since I only see row in print. Thanks for
    the info.

    But I can remember hearing row pronounced like plough before. I would
    have tried to spell it as "rough" but that pronounces as "ruff"!

    I would suspect there is some connection between row and rowdy, which I
    am familiar with. Maybe row is a shortened word for rowdy?

    Ain't English fun?! It is so dynamic that once you learn something, it
    changes.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  14. Re: Open Office spell checker

    Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:
    > On 2008-04-20, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >> Will wrote:
    >>

    > ...
    >
    >> Do you feel the "Americanized" English is stronger in the Western
    >> Provinces, or more in the Eastern and/or Maritime?
    >>

    >
    > I see both in use across the country. I set crossword puzzles for
    > a newspaper and a magazine. The newspaper, located in Toronto, but
    > owned by a Quebec company, uses the English spellings. The
    > magazine, headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, uses American
    > spellings.
    >



    Hmmm. I wonder if Quebec is trying to distance themselves from Ottawa,
    and appear more friendly with America, if for no other reason than to
    thumb their noses at Ottawa?

    You are in the printing field? I was a composer and pressman back in the
    1960s. Linotypes, California Job Cases, cylinder presses in job shops,
    etc. Around 1987 I was into "cold type" with PageMaker on a Mac for a
    few newsletters.


    > ...
    >
    >> about the Quebec area, where French has some heavy use? Isn't it an
    >> "official" dual-language province?
    >>

    >
    > The only offically bilingual province is New Brunswick.



    I didn't know NB used anything other than English. I thought QB was the
    only province that was, eh, "different." ;-)

    America is quite different than it was when I was a kid. I learned a few
    cuss words in Spanish back then, but now that I could use Spanish, I've
    forgotten them. ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  15. Re: OT: Re: Open Office spell checker

    Will wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 19:08:59 +0000, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >> No need to feel sorry, Will. That is all good stuff to know, and I thank
    >> you for taking the time to write.
    >>
    >> You've just piqued me bloody interest, eh. ;-)
    >>
    >> Do you feel the "Americanized" English is stronger in the Western
    >> Provinces, or more in the Eastern and/or Maritime?
    >>

    >
    > I'm going to sum up everything I wrote below because I got a bit long
    > winded: Historically, the West was the most "Americanized". I couldn't
    > say for sure now but my guess would be Ontario now.
    >
    > Well, being a history major I can speak fairly knowledgeably about the
    > language in historical terms but I'm not sure what the stats are as of
    > today. Historically, the American influence was strongly felt in the
    > western provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) and at several points
    > the Canadian gov. felt that American influence was in fact growing too
    > strong and American expansion to the north was feared. One of the prime
    > reasons for the formation of our transcontinental railroad was in case of
    > invasion (troop movement). The formation of the NWMP (now RCMP) was also
    > based partly on this fact. Ontario however was a bastion of British
    > culture and due to conflicts such as the American Revolution remained
    > fairly anti-American for a long time.
    >
    > Now however, I'd be hard pressed to say whether one region is more
    > Americanized than most. If I was asked to guess, I'd say Ontario would
    > be a likely candidate since the majority of the population is so close to
    > the border and the urban sprawl is so close. I'm thinking for example
    > the Buffalo/Windsor area.
    >
    > I've grown up and lived in the west my entire life and I don't really
    > notice the differences. We, with accounts made for regional dialects and
    > accents, say the word the say way, just spell it differently than in the
    > U.S. So of course I notice it when reading but it's more of a sub
    > conscious thing. I'm far more likely to notice things like measurements
    > (Imperial vs Metric) or cultural references before I notice spelling.
    >
    >
    >> Or the Yukon, NWT and the new Nunavut? I spent three years in Alaska, so
    >> I'd bet those are similar. IIRC, Alaska was all American English
    >> spelling, but there were a lot of natives (Eskimo and Indian), so spoken
    >> languages varied.
    >>

    >
    > Well...I assume Alaska would use American spelling since it's a
    > state. The Territories I'm not really sure but based on my best guess
    > I would say still use mainly the Canadian/British forms for a couple of
    > reasons. One, most of the English they encounter would be to my
    > thinking, associated with the government. Statistically most non Inuit
    > (proper name for Eskimo) and non Native work for or with the government
    > or in teaching positions. Therefore any written materials would follow
    > the Canadian English spellings. Also, due to the remoteness I would
    > think American influences which we mainly get from American media (TV,
    > magazines etc) would be less available.
    >
    >
    >> What about the Quebec area, where French has some heavy use? Isn't it an
    >> "official" dual-language province? I don't care about the French part,
    >> but what does this do to English spelling?
    >>

    >
    > Quebec is a special case. They're not a dual language province but a
    > French province. All signs are in French only and I believe it's
    > actually a fine-able offence to post signs in English. Basically the
    > only English you'll get in Quebec is if you request it when dealing with
    > the Government. Throughout the country by law you can request any
    > Government service in either official language. Most large companies
    > (ie. Banks) will offer both.
    >
    > New Brunswick is a truly dual language province. Historically it was
    > also strongly British (many British loyalists from the 13 Colonies
    > settled there during the Revolution). PEI and Nova Scotia were also,
    > historically speaking fairly strong British and anti-American, again due
    > to conflicts such as the war of 1812 and the Revolution.
    >
    > Newfoundland....well no one knows wtf they speak.
    >
    > I talk too much heh
    >
    > -will
    >



    Great information, Will. Thank you very much for taking the time to
    share this.

    Someday, soon I hope, while I'm still able to do something, I'd love to
    go back up into northern Ontario and catch some more of your wonderful
    Canadian Walleye. I've never tasted any fish as good as what we cooked
    on the shore of the many connected lakes that make up the Severn River.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  16. Re: Open Office spell checker

    ozzyla wrote:

    > Yo


    > Dose anyone have trouble with openoffice spell checker? using the word
    > prossesor and the spreadsheet i cant seem to get the spell checker to
    > find anything no matter how badly it is spelt?


    I'd say you're also having difficulties with Thunderbird's spell checker

    > And help would be great..


    Try configuring the spell checker and make sure that the language pack
    you wish to use is available. OO spell checking used to be a bit flaky
    but I haven't had a problem with the last few releases.

  17. Re: Open Office spell checker

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > TS Mathews wrote:
    >>> Is Canadian English different than American English?
    >>>
    >>>

    > Yes, I'm well aware of those added "u"s but never knew the reason,
    > besides some edict to keep with an old Empire tradition, as Will
    > mentions. It just makes "English" sound more "Frenchy," which as you
    > know, isn't a favorite thing amongst English-speaking people. ;-)
    >

    Well is n't it a change to read an intellectual discussion on this forum
    as against all the 'abuse' that sometimes you read here. One of my 'M$'
    gripes is the forced use of 'Favorites' rather than 'Favourites' anyway
    I'm glad F/fox uses 'Bookmarks' , I must admit that I use the 's'
    option in some words (which I believed to be the British way) that the
    spell checker insists on 'z'. I believe the use of 'gotten' which
    sounds odd to our ears is actually the original Elizabethan spelling
    which we have long since dropped.

    I heard a BBC discussion 'programme' on Webster's Dictionary (USA
    american). In his time there was not a American Dictionary so he came
    to Europe and studied at the French and I dare say Johnson's attempts.
    He went back home and wrote the first 'English' primer which was adopted
    by all States and was a common means of all the immigrants all learning
    the same 'english' That in itself was a remarkable and profitable,
    (reminds you of our Bill)) achievement in having virtually the whole
    continent understanding each other. I can't say that for the UK. Anyway
    he saw no reason to maintain vague english quirks in spelling so
    adopted his own simplified spelling, like the 'or' in 'colour' a very
    modernistic (nationalistic) approach. So in answer to your query, the
    'u' was dropped by him not added by us.
    However I believe that there are some occasions where it is worth
    maintaining where the spelling as it shows the origin 'root' whether
    it be Latin, Greek (ph) , French (mme) or German (politely referred to
    as Saxon, they came over, after the French, on their first attempt)

    Yes of course there is a strong strand of french in the english
    language, blame William 1 in 1066 for that and remember that kings of
    England, up to Henry VII, were also kings of (part) France). Therefrom
    the Queen of England speaks french and is still the Duke of Normandy, as
    remains in the Channel Islands

    However I believe the English do not hesitate to adopt 'foreign' words
    and so enhance the language rather than the french attitude of 'we must
    keep our language pure french'. (excepting 'weekend' and 'sandwich')
    Having said that I am appalled at the poor standard of english use my
    modern reporters ('numbers' rather than 'figures' where appropriate) and
    the TV 'soap operas' promoting sloppy grammar in those dreadful programmes.

    Well, thanks to this technology and spell checkers we can have such a
    sensible discussion and understand each other. Cheers to the Canadians
    for showing there distinctive roots too! And maybe just a little cheer
    for our Bill who unwittingly promoted the use of english around the world.
    Yours truly,


  18. Re: OT: Re: Open Office spell checker

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > Someday, soon I hope, while I'm still able to do something, I'd love to
    > go back up into northern Ontario and catch some more of your wonderful
    > Canadian Walleye. I've never tasted any fish as good as what we cooked
    > on the shore of the many connected lakes that make up the Severn River.
    >

    How about a good Pike or Muskie?
    Assuming you could get the latter into the boat.
    Plus an added benefit, they bite with real teeth.
    Fisherman's dream fresh water fish.
    Bill Baka

  19. Re: OT: Re: Open Office spell checker

    Bill Baka wrote:
    > John F. Morse wrote:
    >> Someday, soon I hope, while I'm still able to do something, I'd love
    >> to go back up into northern Ontario and catch some more of your
    >> wonderful Canadian Walleye. I've never tasted any fish as good as
    >> what we cooked on the shore of the many connected lakes that make up
    >> the Severn River.
    >>

    > How about a good Pike or Muskie?
    > Assuming you could get the latter into the boat.
    > Plus an added benefit, they bite with real teeth.
    > Fisherman's dream fresh water fish.
    > Bill Baka



    I've never seen a Muskie, which might be a good thing. ;-)

    Walleyes are Pikes, but those Northern Pikes, with a mouthful of razor
    blades, which require steel leaders so they don't bite through the line,
    are too bony for my eating desires. I've seen some monster-sized
    skeletons out on an island where fishermen went to clean their catch so
    the bears wouldn't be attracted to the camp area.

    I'd love to pack up and depart Kansas, and live in northern Ontario, or
    westward.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  20. Re: Open Office spell checker

    Cushie wrote:
    > John F. Morse wrote:
    >> TS Mathews wrote:
    >>>> Is Canadian English different than American English?

    >> Yes, I'm well aware of those added "u"s but never knew the reason,
    >> besides some edict to keep with an old Empire tradition, as Will
    >> mentions. It just makes "English" sound more "Frenchy," which as you
    >> know, isn't a favorite thing amongst English-speaking people. ;-)
    >>

    > Well is n't it a change to read an intellectual discussion on this
    > forum as against all the 'abuse' that sometimes you read here. One of
    > my 'M$' gripes is the forced use of 'Favorites' rather than
    > 'Favourites' anyway I'm glad F/fox uses 'Bookmarks' , I must admit
    > that I use the 's' option in some words (which I believed to be the
    > British way) that the spell checker insists on 'z'. I believe the use
    > of 'gotten' which sounds odd to our ears is actually the original
    > Elizabethan spelling which we have long since dropped.
    >
    > I heard a BBC discussion 'programme' on Webster's Dictionary (USA
    > american). In his time there was not a American Dictionary so he
    > came to Europe and studied at the French and I dare say Johnson's
    > attempts. He went back home and wrote the first 'English' primer
    > which was adopted by all States and was a common means of all the
    > immigrants all learning the same 'english' That in itself was a
    > remarkable and profitable, (reminds you of our Bill)) achievement in
    > having virtually the whole continent understanding each other. I
    > can't say that for the UK. Anyway he saw no reason to maintain vague
    > english quirks in spelling so adopted his own simplified spelling,
    > like the 'or' in 'colour' a very modernistic (nationalistic)
    > approach. So in answer to your query, the 'u' was dropped by him not
    > added by us.
    > However I believe that there are some occasions where it is worth
    > maintaining where the spelling as it shows the origin 'root' whether
    > it be Latin, Greek (ph) , French (mme) or German (politely referred to
    > as Saxon, they came over, after the French, on their first attempt)
    >
    > Yes of course there is a strong strand of french in the english
    > language, blame William 1 in 1066 for that and remember that kings of
    > England, up to Henry VII, were also kings of (part) France).
    > Therefrom the Queen of England speaks french and is still the Duke of
    > Normandy, as remains in the Channel Islands
    >
    > However I believe the English do not hesitate to adopt 'foreign' words
    > and so enhance the language rather than the french attitude of 'we
    > must keep our language pure french'. (excepting 'weekend' and
    > 'sandwich') Having said that I am appalled at the poor standard of
    > english use my modern reporters ('numbers' rather than 'figures' where
    > appropriate) and the TV 'soap operas' promoting sloppy grammar in
    > those dreadful programmes.
    >
    > Well, thanks to this technology and spell checkers we can have such a
    > sensible discussion and understand each other. Cheers to the
    > Canadians for showing there distinctive roots too! And maybe just a
    > little cheer for our Bill who unwittingly promoted the use of english
    > around the world.
    > Yours truly,



    Thanks, Cushie. I too tire of the flames and cross-posting by trolls.

    Maybe if we give 'em a bunch of fishin' tales, they'll start fibbing
    about "the big one that got away," eh?


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

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