That's interesting... - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on That's interesting... - Ubuntu ; Quick background: Couple of months ago, I stumbled across my old copy of RedHat which I had never got around to using, and decided the next time I installed Windows, I'd try Linux again. Bought a couple of books, read ...

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Thread: That's interesting...

  1. That's interesting...

    Quick background: Couple of months ago, I stumbled across my old copy
    of RedHat which I had never got around to using, and decided the next
    time I installed Windows, I'd try Linux again. Bought a couple of
    books, read up.

    Bought a new motherboard, without checking to see if the vendor
    supports Linux. Gigabyte most definitely does not. They say check
    the chip set manufacturer website.

    I installed WindowsXP, then Windows Vista, in dual boot configuration.
    Found that Vista had a useless interface, so booted back into xp,
    which had somehow been slowed to nearly unusable. And an old version
    of Partition Magic damaged my Vista partition, so I restarted, this
    time without Vista.

    When I tried to install Linux in dualboot mode, the only Linux cd
    which would work, trashed my Windows install.

    I tried again, this time putting Linux on a second hard drive, and
    using the bios to switch between drives. I installed four distros of
    Linux, and wound up with only Debian working.

    Meanwhile, on my parents' computers, I had Ubuntu installed, and found
    it was much friendlier than Debian. I had trashed my Windows by this
    time, trying to find software that would work with my dvd recorder
    that knew what to do with an iso.

    So I wiped my Linux disk and installed XP on it. I tried to run
    Ubuntu from the live cd, but nothing ever happened.

    All this time, I've still been running my old computer next to the new
    one. I finally decided to make the new one my main one, and pulled
    the spare video card out of the old to put in the new.

    Out of curiosity, I decided to see how Ubuntu would work now. It
    actually boots now. But for some reason, it boots on the older card,
    but the desktop displays only on the new card. Even though it
    wouldn't even boot when all I had was the new card.

    By the way, the motherboard is based on the Nvidia Nforce 570 sli
    chipset. The new videocard is an MSI GeForce nx8400gs. The old card
    is an evga GeForce 7600 GT.




  2. Re: That's interesting...


    "Todd" wrote in message
    news:klbqv3hcva1hvbvvc1b2te77dit1pfgvu8@4ax.com...
    > Quick background: Couple of months ago, I stumbled across my old copy
    > of RedHat which I had never got around to using, and decided the next
    > time I installed Windows, I'd try Linux again. Bought a couple of
    > books, read up.
    >
    > Bought a new motherboard, without checking to see if the vendor
    > supports Linux. Gigabyte most definitely does not. They say check
    > the chip set manufacturer website.
    >
    > I installed WindowsXP, then Windows Vista, in dual boot configuration.
    > Found that Vista had a useless interface, so booted back into xp,
    > which had somehow been slowed to nearly unusable. And an old version
    > of Partition Magic damaged my Vista partition, so I restarted, this
    > time without Vista.
    >
    > When I tried to install Linux in dualboot mode, the only Linux cd
    > which would work, trashed my Windows install.
    >
    > I tried again, this time putting Linux on a second hard drive, and
    > using the bios to switch between drives. I installed four distros of
    > Linux, and wound up with only Debian working.
    >
    > Meanwhile, on my parents' computers, I had Ubuntu installed, and found
    > it was much friendlier than Debian. I had trashed my Windows by this
    > time, trying to find software that would work with my dvd recorder
    > that knew what to do with an iso.
    >
    > So I wiped my Linux disk and installed XP on it. I tried to run
    > Ubuntu from the live cd, but nothing ever happened.
    >
    > All this time, I've still been running my old computer next to the new
    > one. I finally decided to make the new one my main one, and pulled
    > the spare video card out of the old to put in the new.
    >
    > Out of curiosity, I decided to see how Ubuntu would work now. It
    > actually boots now. But for some reason, it boots on the older card,
    > but the desktop displays only on the new card. Even though it
    > wouldn't even boot when all I had was the new card.
    >
    > By the way, the motherboard is based on the Nvidia Nforce 570 sli
    > chipset. The new videocard is an MSI GeForce nx8400gs. The old card
    > is an evga GeForce 7600 GT.
    >
    >
    >

    What a cluster f*ck



  3. Re: That's interesting...

    Todd wrote:

    > Quick background: Couple of months ago, I stumbled across my old copy
    > of RedHat which I had never got around to using, and decided the next
    > time I installed Windows, I'd try Linux again. Bought a couple of
    > books, read up.
    >
    > Bought a new motherboard, without checking to see if the vendor
    > supports Linux. Gigabyte most definitely does not. They say check
    > the chip set manufacturer website.
    >
    > I installed WindowsXP, then Windows Vista, in dual boot configuration.
    > Found that Vista had a useless interface, so booted back into xp,
    > which had somehow been slowed to nearly unusable. And an old version
    > of Partition Magic damaged my Vista partition, so I restarted, this
    > time without Vista.
    >
    > When I tried to install Linux in dualboot mode, the only Linux cd
    > which would work, trashed my Windows install.
    >
    > I tried again, this time putting Linux on a second hard drive, and
    > using the bios to switch between drives. I installed four distros of
    > Linux, and wound up with only Debian working.
    >
    > Meanwhile, on my parents' computers, I had Ubuntu installed, and found
    > it was much friendlier than Debian. I had trashed my Windows by this
    > time, trying to find software that would work with my dvd recorder
    > that knew what to do with an iso.
    >
    > So I wiped my Linux disk and installed XP on it. I tried to run
    > Ubuntu from the live cd, but nothing ever happened.
    >
    > All this time, I've still been running my old computer next to the new
    > one. I finally decided to make the new one my main one, and pulled
    > the spare video card out of the old to put in the new.
    >
    > Out of curiosity, I decided to see how Ubuntu would work now. It
    > actually boots now. But for some reason, it boots on the older card,
    > but the desktop displays only on the new card. Even though it
    > wouldn't even boot when all I had was the new card.
    >
    > By the way, the motherboard is based on the Nvidia Nforce 570 sli
    > chipset. The new videocard is an MSI GeForce nx8400gs. The old card
    > is an evga GeForce 7600 GT.


    So... in the end linux works and windows doesn't. No surprise there...

    --

    Jerry McBride (jmcbride@mail-on.us)

  4. Re: That's interesting...

    Jerry McBride wrote:
    > So... in the end linux works and windows doesn't. No surprise there...


    And in the beginning Windows works and Linux doesn't. Surprised yet?


    --
    Wes Groleau

    It seems a pity that psychology should have
    destroyed all our knowledge of human nature.
    -- G. K. Chesterton

  5. Re: That's interesting...

    Fred Williams wrote:
    > On Saturday 12 April 2008 21:17, Wes Groleau wrote:
    >> Jerry McBride wrote:
    >>> So... in the end linux works and windows doesn't. No surprise
    >>> there...

    >> And in the beginning Windows works and Linux doesn't. Surprised yet?
    >>

    > That would be surprising, if it were true. Linux has always worked and
    > worked well.


    You're saying Todd is a liar.

    Well, he might be, but I'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

    On the more general level, your statement is false. Linux is
    in general quality code, but it is created by humans and installed
    by humans on hardware that is not infallible. It is not very hard
    to find someone who has had some difficulty at one time or another.

    If you will say "almost always" or "usually," then I will accept it.

    --
    Wes Groleau
    "Would the prodigal have gone home if
    the elder brother was running the farm?"
    -- James Jordan

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