Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux - Ubuntu ; On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:18:29 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote: > Today I had the chance to play with a fully functional Vista box, this one > to be precise: http://www.medion.de/md8830/uk/flash.html , offered > as "Multimedia Entertainment PC". You're a ...

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Thread: Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

  1. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:18:29 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:

    > Today I had the chance to play with a fully functional Vista box, this one
    > to be precise: http://www.medion.de/md8830/uk/flash.html, offered
    > as "Multimedia Entertainment PC".


    You're a Linux user, what would you know about Multimedia?

    > Well, of course it sucked, although it wasn't as bad as my first Vista
    > experience.


    Which expereince was that?
    The girl on the train fairy tale or the one about the 2 ladies and a
    donkey?

    > Cold boot time was impressive (for Vista, that is): after 40
    > seconds, the desktop showed, and after another minute, the machine was
    > quite responsive -- that is, with a working network connection present.


    You sat there and measured this?
    How do you know it wasn't 38 seconds?
    Or maybe 45 seconds?
    Are you certain it was 40 seconds?


    > Without a network connection, boot time is almost 5 minutes; don't ask me
    > why this is. Anyway, under normal conditions, it boots only twice as slow
    > as Linux/KDE (Mandriva), so that's pretty good.


    Which one of the 1000+ versions of Linux would this be?

    Do you know for a fact that the Vista machine booted slower than all 1000+
    different Linux versions?

    > Other minor annoyances: the mouse wheel doesn't work, the sound output has a
    > tinny quality and infrequently produces soft interference clicks (although
    > hardly audible), the TV output picture frankly sucks, and so far, no-one
    > has succeeded in getting the built-in tuner card to work (I couldn't even
    > get it to show up in Vista's hardware list).


    Fairy tales can come true they can happen to you if your yourg at
    heart.....

    I think you must have been on the Linux machine for that one.

    Or, you are telling tales again Ritchie....


    > And of course it's sluggish.


    So you've said.

    > In a lot of tools and dialogs (e.g. nVidia's screen settings), Vista takes
    > a full second or more to respond to mouse clicks. And when I created a
    > recovery DVD with the factory preinstalled image, the system completely
    > froze for fully four minutes, during which literally nothing appeared to
    > happen -- and if there hadn't been a warning dialog that "the machine may
    > become unresponsive for a few moments", I probably would have rebooted it
    > after a minute or so. But burning the DVD actually seems to have succeeded
    > (although I couldn't find any verification tool).


    Ohhhhhh, you should have left that one out Ritchie.......

    So this was a preloaded system and you expect us to believe that all the
    above (TV etc) didn't work out of the box?

    You're not a good story teller Ritchie.


    > On the bright side: in the four hours I checked out the machine and tried
    > getting the tuner card and dual screen output to work (failing miserably on
    > both counts -- but then again, I'm not a Windows expert) I only got two
    > expection errors, and nothing actually crashed or froze (at least for more
    > than a second or so), so Vista seems pretty stable.


    More tales....

    There is no point in even going any further with this one because obviously
    you are making up yet another story.

    And I thought your last tale of woe with the pretty young girl on the train
    was a humdinger!

    You need to take fairy tale writing lessons from Kelsey.
    She is the best at this.

    > Anyway, the owner was rather disappointed with his "multimedia machine", and
    > wanted to see if Linux could do better. After creating a 20GB empty
    > partition with Vista's disk management tool (which wasn't too bad), the
    > installation of Mandriva took less than 15 minutes, and most hardware was
    > installed and recognized fine. It took half an hour more to update the
    > installation and install the multimedia stuff (nVidia drivers, codecs and
    > other non-free software), after which all worked just fine -- except the
    > tuner card. Unsurprisingly, Mandriva was much faster and snappier than
    > Vista: total boot time between power-up and a fully loaded desktop is a
    > mere 45 seconds, and most things happen at a blistering speed, with
    > Mandriva immediately responding to every user action. Even OpenOffice
    > starts in only three seconds :-) And oh, the mouse wheel functions, and the
    > sound quality is vastly better too.
    >
    > The only disappointment was that I couldn't get the tuner card (Creatix
    > CTX953) to work. It was recognized, but there appears to be no Linux
    > support for it yet (and I didn't want to go through the trouble of
    > compiling experimental support for this beastie in a kernel module).
    > Another drawback is that the man is still tied to Vista because of a few
    > apps (AutoCAD and something I didn't rememeber the name of) for which
    > there's no viable Linux equivalent. So I wonder if he's going to use Linux
    > at all -- he seemed impressed with what he saw, but I know from experience
    > that having to reboot on a regular basis is quite a turn-off; people will
    > rather stick with what they're most familiar with, even though they don't
    > really like it much.
    >
    > So the verdict is that yes, Vista sucks -- but for most people, it's not bad
    > enough to make them switch to something completely different and
    > unfamiliar. They simply put up with the crap ("Ah well, I guess I'll have
    > to stick to the TV + VCR a little longer.")
    >
    >
    > Richard Rasker



    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  2. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:18:29 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:
    >
    >> Today I had the chance to play with a fully functional Vista box, this one
    >> to be precise: http://www.medion.de/md8830/uk/flash.html, offered
    >> as "Multimedia Entertainment PC".

    >
    > You're a Linux user, what would you know about Multimedia?
    >
    >> Well, of course it sucked, although it wasn't as bad as my first Vista
    >> experience.

    >
    > Which expereince was that?
    > The girl on the train fairy tale or the one about the 2 ladies and a
    > donkey?
    >
    >> Cold boot time was impressive (for Vista, that is): after 40
    >> seconds, the desktop showed, and after another minute, the machine was
    >> quite responsive -- that is, with a working network connection present.

    >
    > You sat there and measured this?
    > How do you know it wasn't 38 seconds?
    > Or maybe 45 seconds?
    > Are you certain it was 40 seconds?
    >
    >
    >> Without a network connection, boot time is almost 5 minutes; don't ask me
    >> why this is. Anyway, under normal conditions, it boots only twice as slow
    >> as Linux/KDE (Mandriva), so that's pretty good.

    >
    > Which one of the 1000+ versions of Linux would this be?
    >
    > Do you know for a fact that the Vista machine booted slower than all 1000+
    > different Linux versions?
    >
    >> Other minor annoyances: the mouse wheel doesn't work, the sound output has a
    >> tinny quality and infrequently produces soft interference clicks (although
    >> hardly audible), the TV output picture frankly sucks, and so far, no-one
    >> has succeeded in getting the built-in tuner card to work (I couldn't even
    >> get it to show up in Vista's hardware list).

    >
    > Fairy tales can come true they can happen to you if your yourg at
    > heart.....
    >
    > I think you must have been on the Linux machine for that one.
    >
    > Or, you are telling tales again Ritchie....
    >
    >
    >> And of course it's sluggish.

    >
    > So you've said.
    >
    >> In a lot of tools and dialogs (e.g. nVidia's screen settings), Vista takes
    >> a full second or more to respond to mouse clicks. And when I created a
    >> recovery DVD with the factory preinstalled image, the system completely
    >> froze for fully four minutes, during which literally nothing appeared to
    >> happen -- and if there hadn't been a warning dialog that "the machine may
    >> become unresponsive for a few moments", I probably would have rebooted it
    >> after a minute or so. But burning the DVD actually seems to have succeeded
    >> (although I couldn't find any verification tool).

    >
    > Ohhhhhh, you should have left that one out Ritchie.......
    >
    > So this was a preloaded system and you expect us to believe that all the
    > above (TV etc) didn't work out of the box?
    >
    > You're not a good story teller Ritchie.
    >
    >
    >> On the bright side: in the four hours I checked out the machine and tried
    >> getting the tuner card and dual screen output to work (failing miserably on
    >> both counts -- but then again, I'm not a Windows expert) I only got two
    >> expection errors, and nothing actually crashed or froze (at least for more
    >> than a second or so), so Vista seems pretty stable.

    >
    > More tales....
    >
    > There is no point in even going any further with this one because obviously
    > you are making up yet another story.
    >
    > And I thought your last tale of woe with the pretty young girl on the train
    > was a humdinger!
    >
    > You need to take fairy tale writing lessons from Kelsey.
    > She is the best at this.
    >
    >> Anyway, the owner was rather disappointed with his "multimedia machine", and
    >> wanted to see if Linux could do better. After creating a 20GB empty
    >> partition with Vista's disk management tool (which wasn't too bad), the
    >> installation of Mandriva took less than 15 minutes, and most hardware was
    >> installed and recognized fine. It took half an hour more to update the
    >> installation and install the multimedia stuff (nVidia drivers, codecs and
    >> other non-free software), after which all worked just fine -- except the
    >> tuner card. Unsurprisingly, Mandriva was much faster and snappier than
    >> Vista: total boot time between power-up and a fully loaded desktop is a
    >> mere 45 seconds, and most things happen at a blistering speed, with
    >> Mandriva immediately responding to every user action. Even OpenOffice
    >> starts in only three seconds :-) And oh, the mouse wheel functions, and the
    >> sound quality is vastly better too.
    >>
    >> The only disappointment was that I couldn't get the tuner card (Creatix
    >> CTX953) to work. It was recognized, but there appears to be no Linux
    >> support for it yet (and I didn't want to go through the trouble of
    >> compiling experimental support for this beastie in a kernel module).
    >> Another drawback is that the man is still tied to Vista because of a few
    >> apps (AutoCAD and something I didn't rememeber the name of) for which
    >> there's no viable Linux equivalent. So I wonder if he's going to use Linux
    >> at all -- he seemed impressed with what he saw, but I know from experience
    >> that having to reboot on a regular basis is quite a turn-off; people will
    >> rather stick with what they're most familiar with, even though they don't
    >> really like it much.
    >>
    >> So the verdict is that yes, Vista sucks -- but for most people, it's not bad
    >> enough to make them switch to something completely different and
    >> unfamiliar. They simply put up with the crap ("Ah well, I guess I'll have
    >> to stick to the TV + VCR a little longer.")
    >>
    >>
    >> Richard Rasker

    >
    >


    I have a HP DV9000 Entertainment laptop that's got the whole 10 yards of
    stuff on it along with other things -- tv, dvd, etc, ect. I do have
    software development tools on the machine as a professional programmer.
    I have had no problems using the laptop running Vista for home or
    professional usage -- none.

    I don't know what this person is talking about. Maybe, he shouldn't be
    using any computer with an O/S period. It seems that he doesn't know
    what he is doing with a computer.


  3. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    On Sun, 06 Apr 2008 21:31:22 -0400, What? wrote:

    > Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >> On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:18:29 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:
    >>
    >>> Today I had the chance to play with a fully functional Vista box, this one
    >>> to be precise: http://www.medion.de/md8830/uk/flash.html, offered
    >>> as "Multimedia Entertainment PC".

    >>
    >> You're a Linux user, what would you know about Multimedia?
    >>
    >>> Well, of course it sucked, although it wasn't as bad as my first Vista
    >>> experience.

    >>
    >> Which expereince was that?
    >> The girl on the train fairy tale or the one about the 2 ladies and a
    >> donkey?
    >>
    >>> Cold boot time was impressive (for Vista, that is): after 40
    >>> seconds, the desktop showed, and after another minute, the machine was
    >>> quite responsive -- that is, with a working network connection present.

    >>
    >> You sat there and measured this?
    >> How do you know it wasn't 38 seconds?
    >> Or maybe 45 seconds?
    >> Are you certain it was 40 seconds?
    >>
    >>
    >>> Without a network connection, boot time is almost 5 minutes; don't ask me
    >>> why this is. Anyway, under normal conditions, it boots only twice as slow
    >>> as Linux/KDE (Mandriva), so that's pretty good.

    >>
    >> Which one of the 1000+ versions of Linux would this be?
    >>
    >> Do you know for a fact that the Vista machine booted slower than all 1000+
    >> different Linux versions?
    >>
    >>> Other minor annoyances: the mouse wheel doesn't work, the sound output has a
    >>> tinny quality and infrequently produces soft interference clicks (although
    >>> hardly audible), the TV output picture frankly sucks, and so far, no-one
    >>> has succeeded in getting the built-in tuner card to work (I couldn't even
    >>> get it to show up in Vista's hardware list).

    >>
    >> Fairy tales can come true they can happen to you if your yourg at
    >> heart.....
    >>
    >> I think you must have been on the Linux machine for that one.
    >>
    >> Or, you are telling tales again Ritchie....
    >>
    >>
    >>> And of course it's sluggish.

    >>
    >> So you've said.
    >>
    >>> In a lot of tools and dialogs (e.g. nVidia's screen settings), Vista takes
    >>> a full second or more to respond to mouse clicks. And when I created a
    >>> recovery DVD with the factory preinstalled image, the system completely
    >>> froze for fully four minutes, during which literally nothing appeared to
    >>> happen -- and if there hadn't been a warning dialog that "the machine may
    >>> become unresponsive for a few moments", I probably would have rebooted it
    >>> after a minute or so. But burning the DVD actually seems to have succeeded
    >>> (although I couldn't find any verification tool).

    >>
    >> Ohhhhhh, you should have left that one out Ritchie.......
    >>
    >> So this was a preloaded system and you expect us to believe that all the
    >> above (TV etc) didn't work out of the box?
    >>
    >> You're not a good story teller Ritchie.
    >>
    >>
    >>> On the bright side: in the four hours I checked out the machine and tried
    >>> getting the tuner card and dual screen output to work (failing miserably on
    >>> both counts -- but then again, I'm not a Windows expert) I only got two
    >>> expection errors, and nothing actually crashed or froze (at least for more
    >>> than a second or so), so Vista seems pretty stable.

    >>
    >> More tales....
    >>
    >> There is no point in even going any further with this one because obviously
    >> you are making up yet another story.
    >>
    >> And I thought your last tale of woe with the pretty young girl on the train
    >> was a humdinger!
    >>
    >> You need to take fairy tale writing lessons from Kelsey.
    >> She is the best at this.
    >>
    >>> Anyway, the owner was rather disappointed with his "multimedia machine", and
    >>> wanted to see if Linux could do better. After creating a 20GB empty
    >>> partition with Vista's disk management tool (which wasn't too bad), the
    >>> installation of Mandriva took less than 15 minutes, and most hardware was
    >>> installed and recognized fine. It took half an hour more to update the
    >>> installation and install the multimedia stuff (nVidia drivers, codecs and
    >>> other non-free software), after which all worked just fine -- except the
    >>> tuner card. Unsurprisingly, Mandriva was much faster and snappier than
    >>> Vista: total boot time between power-up and a fully loaded desktop is a
    >>> mere 45 seconds, and most things happen at a blistering speed, with
    >>> Mandriva immediately responding to every user action. Even OpenOffice
    >>> starts in only three seconds :-) And oh, the mouse wheel functions, and the
    >>> sound quality is vastly better too.
    >>>
    >>> The only disappointment was that I couldn't get the tuner card (Creatix
    >>> CTX953) to work. It was recognized, but there appears to be no Linux
    >>> support for it yet (and I didn't want to go through the trouble of
    >>> compiling experimental support for this beastie in a kernel module).
    >>> Another drawback is that the man is still tied to Vista because of a few
    >>> apps (AutoCAD and something I didn't rememeber the name of) for which
    >>> there's no viable Linux equivalent. So I wonder if he's going to use Linux
    >>> at all -- he seemed impressed with what he saw, but I know from experience
    >>> that having to reboot on a regular basis is quite a turn-off; people will
    >>> rather stick with what they're most familiar with, even though they don't
    >>> really like it much.
    >>>
    >>> So the verdict is that yes, Vista sucks -- but for most people, it's not bad
    >>> enough to make them switch to something completely different and
    >>> unfamiliar. They simply put up with the crap ("Ah well, I guess I'll have
    >>> to stick to the TV + VCR a little longer.")
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Richard Rasker

    >>
    >>

    >
    > I have a HP DV9000 Entertainment laptop that's got the whole 10 yards of
    > stuff on it along with other things -- tv, dvd, etc, ect. I do have
    > software development tools on the machine as a professional programmer.
    > I have had no problems using the laptop running Vista for home or
    > professional usage -- none.
    >
    > I don't know what this person is talking about. Maybe, he shouldn't be
    > using any computer with an O/S period. It seems that he doesn't know
    > what he is doing with a computer.


    How true.

    Rasker comes up with these fairy tales about once a week or so and each and
    every time he shoots himself in the foot.

    There is another fairy tale composer in COLA and that is Kelsey who writes
    similar kinds of stories where Windows sucks and Linux saves the day.

    The tipoff BTW was that it was a pre loaded machine specifically designed
    for multimedia.
    These Linux storytellers never know when to stop and tone the story down a
    little to make it more believable.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  4. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    What? wrote:

    > I have a HP DV9000 Entertainment laptop that's got the whole 10 yards of
    > stuff on it along with other things -- tv, dvd, etc, ect.


    You poor sap.

    > I do have
    > software development tools on the machine as a professional programmer.


    Ha Ha Ha Ha!

    > I have had no problems using the laptop running Vista for home or
    > professional usage -- none.


    You must have the special "friend of Bill" version, then. /Everybody/ else
    has massive problems with Vista - it lasted less than 20 minutes on
    the 'net here before it was compromised, and it wouldn't work with most
    hardware. The hardware drivers for Vista are still a joke, and the average
    user simply doesn't want to have to buy all his application software yet
    again.

    > I don't know what this person is talking about.


    As a Windoze "professional", you wouldn't. You're the kind of moron who
    thinks that Visual Basic is a "programming language"!

    > Maybe, he shouldn't be using any computer with an O/S period.


    Perhaps /you/ shouldn't. As a Windoze "professional", you're as much use to
    the world as a chocolate teapot.

    > It seems that he doesn't know what he is doing with a computer.


    If you're "running" Windoze, nor do you!

    C.

  5. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    Christopher Hunter writes:

    > What? wrote:
    >
    >> I have a HP DV9000 Entertainment laptop that's got the whole 10 yards of
    >> stuff on it along with other things -- tv, dvd, etc, ect.

    >
    > You poor sap.
    >
    >> I do have
    >> software development tools on the machine as a professional programmer.

    >
    > Ha Ha Ha Ha!


    No one has quite the "tools" that Christopher Hunter has folks!

    >
    >> I have had no problems using the laptop running Vista for home or
    >> professional usage -- none.

    >
    > You must have the special "friend of Bill" version, then. /Everybody/ else
    > has massive problems with Vista - it lasted less than 20 minutes on
    > the 'net here before it was compromised, and it wouldn't work with most
    > hardware. The hardware drivers for Vista are still a joke, and the average
    > user simply doesn't want to have to buy all his application software yet
    > again.
    >
    >> I don't know what this person is talking about.

    >
    > As a Windoze "professional", you wouldn't. You're the kind of moron who
    > thinks that Visual Basic is a "programming language"!
    >
    >> Maybe, he shouldn't be using any computer with an O/S period.

    >
    > Perhaps /you/ shouldn't. As a Windoze "professional", you're as much use to
    > the world as a chocolate teapot.
    >
    >> It seems that he doesn't know what he is doing with a computer.

    >
    > If you're "running" Windoze, nor do you!
    >
    > C.


    Well at least he probably has a target audience who pay for SW. Still we
    can't all be millionaires and sex gods like you eh Chunt?

    LOL. What a big head!

  6. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    * What? peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > I don't know what this person is talking about. Maybe, he shouldn't be
    > using any computer with an O/S period. It seems that he doesn't know
    > what he is doing with a computer.


    Riiiiiiiiight.

    --
    Microsoft looks at new ideas, they don't evaluate whether the idea will move
    the industry forward, they ask, 'how will it help us sell more copies of
    Windows?'
    -- Bill Gates, The Seattle Weekly, (April 30, 1998)[2]

  7. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux

    ignorant people make the best vista users


    "Moshe Goldfarb" wrote in message
    news:a5xbqpgeqyp6.18p12x8rd7m2g.dlg@40tude.net...
    > On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:18:29 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:
    >
    >> Today I had the chance to play with a fully functional Vista box, this
    >> one
    >> to be precise: http://www.medion.de/md8830/uk/flash.html, offered
    >> as "Multimedia Entertainment PC".

    >
    > You're a Linux user, what would you know about Multimedia?
    >
    >> Well, of course it sucked, although it wasn't as bad as my first Vista
    >> experience.

    >
    > Which expereince was that?
    > The girl on the train fairy tale or the one about the 2 ladies and a
    > donkey?
    >
    >> Cold boot time was impressive (for Vista, that is): after 40
    >> seconds, the desktop showed, and after another minute, the machine was
    >> quite responsive -- that is, with a working network connection present.

    >
    > You sat there and measured this?
    > How do you know it wasn't 38 seconds?
    > Or maybe 45 seconds?
    > Are you certain it was 40 seconds?
    >
    >
    >> Without a network connection, boot time is almost 5 minutes; don't ask me
    >> why this is. Anyway, under normal conditions, it boots only twice as slow
    >> as Linux/KDE (Mandriva), so that's pretty good.

    >
    > Which one of the 1000+ versions of Linux would this be?
    >
    > Do you know for a fact that the Vista machine booted slower than all 1000+
    > different Linux versions?
    >
    >> Other minor annoyances: the mouse wheel doesn't work, the sound output
    >> has a
    >> tinny quality and infrequently produces soft interference clicks
    >> (although
    >> hardly audible), the TV output picture frankly sucks, and so far, no-one
    >> has succeeded in getting the built-in tuner card to work (I couldn't even
    >> get it to show up in Vista's hardware list).

    >
    > Fairy tales can come true they can happen to you if your yourg at
    > heart.....
    >
    > I think you must have been on the Linux machine for that one.
    >
    > Or, you are telling tales again Ritchie....
    >
    >
    >> And of course it's sluggish.

    >
    > So you've said.
    >
    >> In a lot of tools and dialogs (e.g. nVidia's screen settings), Vista
    >> takes
    >> a full second or more to respond to mouse clicks. And when I created a
    >> recovery DVD with the factory preinstalled image, the system completely
    >> froze for fully four minutes, during which literally nothing appeared to
    >> happen -- and if there hadn't been a warning dialog that "the machine may
    >> become unresponsive for a few moments", I probably would have rebooted it
    >> after a minute or so. But burning the DVD actually seems to have
    >> succeeded
    >> (although I couldn't find any verification tool).

    >
    > Ohhhhhh, you should have left that one out Ritchie.......
    >
    > So this was a preloaded system and you expect us to believe that all the
    > above (TV etc) didn't work out of the box?
    >
    > You're not a good story teller Ritchie.
    >
    >
    >> On the bright side: in the four hours I checked out the machine and tried
    >> getting the tuner card and dual screen output to work (failing miserably
    >> on
    >> both counts -- but then again, I'm not a Windows expert) I only got two
    >> expection errors, and nothing actually crashed or froze (at least for
    >> more
    >> than a second or so), so Vista seems pretty stable.

    >
    > More tales....
    >
    > There is no point in even going any further with this one because
    > obviously
    > you are making up yet another story.
    >
    > And I thought your last tale of woe with the pretty young girl on the
    > train
    > was a humdinger!
    >
    > You need to take fairy tale writing lessons from Kelsey.
    > She is the best at this.
    >
    >> Anyway, the owner was rather disappointed with his "multimedia machine",
    >> and
    >> wanted to see if Linux could do better. After creating a 20GB empty
    >> partition with Vista's disk management tool (which wasn't too bad), the
    >> installation of Mandriva took less than 15 minutes, and most hardware was
    >> installed and recognized fine. It took half an hour more to update the
    >> installation and install the multimedia stuff (nVidia drivers, codecs and
    >> other non-free software), after which all worked just fine -- except the
    >> tuner card. Unsurprisingly, Mandriva was much faster and snappier than
    >> Vista: total boot time between power-up and a fully loaded desktop is a
    >> mere 45 seconds, and most things happen at a blistering speed, with
    >> Mandriva immediately responding to every user action. Even OpenOffice
    >> starts in only three seconds :-) And oh, the mouse wheel functions, and
    >> the
    >> sound quality is vastly better too.
    >>
    >> The only disappointment was that I couldn't get the tuner card (Creatix
    >> CTX953) to work. It was recognized, but there appears to be no Linux
    >> support for it yet (and I didn't want to go through the trouble of
    >> compiling experimental support for this beastie in a kernel module).
    >> Another drawback is that the man is still tied to Vista because of a few
    >> apps (AutoCAD and something I didn't rememeber the name of) for which
    >> there's no viable Linux equivalent. So I wonder if he's going to use
    >> Linux
    >> at all -- he seemed impressed with what he saw, but I know from
    >> experience
    >> that having to reboot on a regular basis is quite a turn-off; people will
    >> rather stick with what they're most familiar with, even though they don't
    >> really like it much.
    >>
    >> So the verdict is that yes, Vista sucks -- but for most people, it's not
    >> bad
    >> enough to make them switch to something completely different and
    >> unfamiliar. They simply put up with the crap ("Ah well, I guess I'll have
    >> to stick to the TV + VCR a little longer.")
    >>
    >>
    >> Richard Rasker

    >
    >
    > --
    > Moshe Goldfarb
    > Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    > Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    > http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/




  8. Re: Another Vista machine upgraded to Linux


    "Moshe Goldfarb" wrote in message
    news:a5xbqpgeqyp6.18p12x8rd7m2g.dlg@40tude.net...
    > On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:18:29 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:
    >
    >> Today I had the chance to play with a fully functional Vista box, this
    >> one
    >> to be precise: http://www.medion.de/md8830/uk/flash.html, offered
    >> as "Multimedia Entertainment PC".

    >
    > You're a Linux user, what would you know about Multimedia?
    >
    >> Well, of course it sucked, although it wasn't as bad as my first Vista
    >> experience.

    >
    > Which expereince was that?
    > The girl on the train fairy tale or the one about the 2 ladies and a
    > donkey?
    >
    >> Cold boot time was impressive (for Vista, that is): after 40
    >> seconds, the desktop showed, and after another minute, the machine was
    >> quite responsive -- that is, with a working network connection present.

    >
    > You sat there and measured this?
    > How do you know it wasn't 38 seconds?
    > Or maybe 45 seconds?
    > Are you certain it was 40 seconds?
    >
    >
    >> Without a network connection, boot time is almost 5 minutes; don't ask me
    >> why this is. Anyway, under normal conditions, it boots only twice as slow
    >> as Linux/KDE (Mandriva), so that's pretty good.


    Normal time on a decent machine is about 90 seconds which would be 2x as
    fast as your Linux.



    >
    > Which one of the 1000+ versions of Linux would this be?
    >
    > Do you know for a fact that the Vista machine booted slower than all 1000+
    > different Linux versions?
    >
    >> Other minor annoyances: the mouse wheel doesn't work,


    You know how to set up a mouse? lol


    the sound output has a
    >> tinny quality and infrequently produces soft interference clicks


    ***Only when used with a compatible surround-sound speaker system (not
    supplied).




    (although
    >> hardly audible), the TV output picture frankly sucks,


    *Requires DVB-T Freeview® or other digital services in your local area.
    Corresponding antennae required, not included.


    and so far, no-one
    >> has succeeded in getting the built-in tuner card to work (I couldn't even
    >> get it to show up in Vista's hardware list).


    Apparently you don't know what you're doing. I never heard of that brand,
    why don't you try Vista on a Sony or HP.



    >
    > Fairy tales can come true they can happen to you if your yourg at
    > heart.....
    >
    > I think you must have been on the Linux machine for that one.
    >
    > Or, you are telling tales again Ritchie....
    >
    >
    >> And of course it's sluggish.

    >
    > So you've said.
    >
    >> In a lot of tools and dialogs (e.g. nVidia's screen settings), Vista
    >> takes
    >> a full second or more to respond to mouse clicks. And when I created a
    >> recovery DVD with the factory preinstalled image, the system completely
    >> froze for fully four minutes, during which literally nothing appeared to
    >> happen -


    Key word-Appeared. You have no idea what was happening.


    - and if there hadn't been a warning dialog that "the machine may
    >> become unresponsive for a few moments", I probably would have rebooted it
    >> after a minute or so. But burning the DVD actually seems to have
    >> succeeded
    >> (although I couldn't find any verification tool).

    >
    > Ohhhhhh, you should have left that one out Ritchie.......
    >
    > So this was a preloaded system and you expect us to believe that all the
    > above (TV etc) didn't work out of the box?


    Well of course it's possible on these off brand machines but highly
    unlikely.


    >
    > You're not a good story teller Ritchie.
    >
    >
    >> On the bright side: in the four hours I checked out the machine and tried
    >> getting the tuner card and dual screen output to work (failing miserably
    >> on
    >> both counts -- but then again, I'm not a Windows expert) I only got two
    >> expection errors, and nothing actually crashed or froze (at least for
    >> more
    >> than a second or so), so Vista seems pretty stable.

    >
    > More tales....
    >
    > There is no point in even going any further with this one because
    > obviously
    > you are making up yet another story.
    >
    > And I thought your last tale of woe with the pretty young girl on the
    > train
    > was a humdinger!
    >
    > You need to take fairy tale writing lessons from Kelsey.
    > She is the best at this.
    >
    >> Anyway, the owner was rather disappointed with his "multimedia machine",
    >> and
    >> wanted to see if Linux could do better. After creating a 20GB empty
    >> partition with Vista's disk management tool (which wasn't too bad), the
    >> installation of Mandriva took less than 15 minutes, and most hardware was
    >> installed and recognized fine. It took half an hour more to update the
    >> installation and install the multimedia stuff (nVidia drivers, codecs and
    >> other non-free software), after which all worked just fine -- except the
    >> tuner card. Unsurprisingly, Mandriva was much faster and snappier than
    >> Vista: total boot time between power-up and a fully loaded desktop is a
    >> mere 45 seconds, and most things happen at a blistering speed, with
    >> Mandriva immediately responding to every user action. Even OpenOffice
    >> starts in only three seconds :-) And oh, the mouse wheel functions, and
    >> the
    >> sound quality is vastly better too.
    >>
    >> The only disappointment was that I couldn't get the tuner card (Creatix
    >> CTX953) to work. It was recognized, but there appears to be no Linux
    >> support for it yet (and I didn't want to go through the trouble of
    >> compiling experimental support for this beastie in a kernel module).
    >> Another drawback is that the man is still tied to Vista because of a few
    >> apps (AutoCAD and something I didn't rememeber the name of) for which
    >> there's no viable Linux equivalent. So I wonder if he's going to use
    >> Linux
    >> at all -- he seemed impressed with what he saw, but I know from
    >> experience
    >> that having to reboot on a regular basis is quite a turn-off; people will
    >> rather stick with what they're most familiar with, even though they don't
    >> really like it much.
    >>
    >> So the verdict is that yes, Vista sucks -- but for most people, it's not
    >> bad
    >> enough to make them switch to something completely different and
    >> unfamiliar. They simply put up with the crap ("Ah well, I guess I'll have
    >> to stick to the TV + VCR a little longer.")


    *Requires DVB-T Freeview® or other digital services in your local area.
    Corresponding antennae required, not included



    >>
    >>
    >> Richard Rasker

    >
    >
    > --
    > Moshe Goldfarb
    > Collector of soaps from around the globe.


    Do you have the soap made at Dachau circa 1944? If you need it to complete
    your collection I'm sure some Linux user has a spare )



    > Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    > http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/




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