Another dual boot problem - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Another dual boot problem - Ubuntu ; Hi all Sorry to bother you all with this but I'm kinda stuck. First of all, I must say I'm new to Linux, so please go easy on me. I've partitioned a IBM T40 laptop in this order; three primary ...

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Thread: Another dual boot problem

  1. Another dual boot problem

    Hi all

    Sorry to bother you all with this but I'm kinda stuck.

    First of all, I must say I'm new to Linux, so please go easy on me.

    I've partitioned a IBM T40 laptop in this order; three primary
    partitions a FAT32 logical for data then two swap files. On the first
    two partitions I'm running xp on the third primary I want to mount
    Ubuntu, (it was formatted reiserfs).

    I've run the live cd and all went well, but after deciding to install
    I'm running into problems. I didn't like the look of the automatic
    install so I opted for the manual. I can see the drive I want to
    install on /dev/sda4 and the swap I want to use is /dev/sda6, I check
    them both click OK and it replies with 'No root file system is
    defined'

    I'm a bit thick when it comes to Linux, what am I doing wrong?

    Tia

    Best regards

    Tony

  2. Re: Another dual boot problem

    On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 02:49:54 +0100, Hadron
    wrote:

    Hi Hadron
    >
    >You have not specified a root mount (/)!


    When I open mount menu I get; /, /boot, /home, /tmp, /usr, /var,
    /srv, /opt and /usr/local

    As I said, I'm new to linux, could you be a bit more specific please.

    >And I suggest don't use reiserfs - Stick with ext3 - support is much easier to get and the developer isn't in
    >prison being tried for the murder of his wife and the disposal of her corpse ....
    >

    Good grief.

    Best regards

    Tony

  3. Re: Another dual boot problem

    Tony Yarwood writes:

    > On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 02:49:54 +0100, Hadron
    > wrote:
    >
    > Hi Hadron
    >>
    >>You have not specified a root mount (/)!

    >
    > When I open mount menu I get; /, /boot, /home, /tmp, /usr, /var,
    > /srv, /opt and /usr/local
    >
    > As I said, I'm new to linux, could you be a bit more specific please.


    You need to read the instructions and read up about the Linux file
    system.

    The answer is (I think) above ....

    Note the "(/)" before the exclamation point (!).

    You need to set a mount point for "/" (ie root).


    >
    >>And I suggest don't use reiserfs - Stick with ext3 - support is much easier to get and the developer isn't in
    >>prison being tried for the murder of his wife and the disposal of her corpse ....
    >>

    > Good grief.
    >


    Yup :-;


    > Best regards
    >
    > Tony


    --
    If Unicron had a tech spec card, his motto would be "That
    which does not become part of the One shall become Void."
    which is sort of a grand-scale, apocalyptic version of "I
    am what I eat."

  4. Re: Another dual boot problem

    On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 02:33:14 +0000, Tony Yarwood wrote:

    >
    > On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 02:49:54 +0100, Hadron
    > wrote:
    >
    > Hi Hadron
    >>
    >>You have not specified a root mount (/)!

    >
    > When I open mount menu I get; /, /boot, /home, /tmp, /usr, /var, /srv,
    > /opt and /usr/local
    >
    > As I said, I'm new to linux, could you be a bit more specific please.


    You want /
    --
    #1 Offishul Ruiner of Usenet, March 2007
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    COOSN-266-06-25794



  5. Re: Another dual boot problem

    On 2008-03-24, Tony Yarwood wrote:
    > On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 02:49:54 +0100, Hadron
    > wrote:
    >
    > Hi Hadron
    >>
    >>You have not specified a root mount (/)!

    >
    > When I open mount menu I get; /, /boot, /home, /tmp, /usr, /var,
    > /srv, /opt and /usr/local
    >
    > As I said, I'm new to linux, could you be a bit more specific please.
    >


    This root question is rather confusing to someone new. root is both a user
    and the place on which the entire file system is attached to. This has the
    symbol / , /root is the user.

    Also get used to the need to have a file system mounted in order to be able
    to see it, or write to it. Ususally this is done automagically but sooner or
    later a manual mount will be required.




  6. Re: Another dual boot problem

    Gordon wrote:

    > This root question is rather confusing to someone new. root is both a user
    > and the place on which the entire file system is attached to. This has the
    > symbol / , /root is the user.



    I see you are a wee bit confused too.

    You are correct in that the root level of the filesystem is shown as "/"
    but the "/root" directory is the home directory for Root, the Superuser
    (while /home is for all other users).


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  7. Re: Another dual boot problem

    Tony Yarwood schreef:
    > Hi all
    >
    > Sorry to bother you all with this but I'm kinda stuck.
    >
    > First of all, I must say I'm new to Linux, so please go easy on me.
    >
    > I've partitioned a IBM T40 laptop in this order; three primary
    > partitions a FAT32 logical for data then two swap files. On the first
    > two partitions I'm running xp on the third primary I want to mount
    > Ubuntu, (it was formatted reiserfs).
    >
    > I've run the live cd and all went well, but after deciding to install
    > I'm running into problems. I didn't like the look of the automatic
    > install so I opted for the manual. I can see the drive I want to
    > install on /dev/sda4 and the swap I want to use is /dev/sda6, I check
    > them both click OK and it replies with 'No root file system is
    > defined'
    >
    > I'm a bit thick when it comes to Linux, what am I doing wrong?
    >
    > Tia
    >
    > Best regards
    >
    > Tony


    Additional to the other replies:
    /dev/sda4 is to host your root file system and the symbol is the
    forward slash /

    Al the others (like /temp, /etc) will be created as sub directories on
    top of it.

    Many knowledgeable like and use Reiserfs but there are indeed some
    support problems :/
    Mr. Reiser is a very intelligent but complicated man, very few would be
    able to follow in his footsteps would he be taken out of circulation.

    A suggestion: Consider also making a small (~50-100MB) /boot partition,
    in case of corruption of the / (root) partition this allows you to
    still boot and fix the root.

  8. Re: Another dual boot problem

    On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 19:23:56 +0100, Dirk T. Verbeek wrote:

    > Tony Yarwood schreef:
    >> Hi all
    >>
    >> Sorry to bother you all with this but I'm kinda stuck.
    >>
    >> First of all, I must say I'm new to Linux, so please go easy on me.
    >>
    >> I've partitioned a IBM T40 laptop in this order; three primary
    >> partitions a FAT32 logical for data then two swap files. On the first
    >> two partitions I'm running xp on the third primary I want to mount
    >> Ubuntu, (it was formatted reiserfs).
    >>
    >> I've run the live cd and all went well, but after deciding to install
    >> I'm running into problems. I didn't like the look of the automatic
    >> install so I opted for the manual. I can see the drive I want to
    >> install on /dev/sda4 and the swap I want to use is /dev/sda6, I check
    >> them both click OK and it replies with 'No root file system is defined'
    >>
    >> I'm a bit thick when it comes to Linux, what am I doing wrong?
    >>
    >> Tia
    >>
    >> Best regards
    >>
    >> Tony

    >
    > Additional to the other replies:
    > /dev/sda4 is to host your root file system and the symbol is the
    > forward slash /
    >
    > Al the others (like /temp, /etc) will be created as sub directories on
    > top of it.
    >
    > Many knowledgeable like and use Reiserfs but there are indeed some
    > support problems :/
    > Mr. Reiser is a very intelligent but complicated man, very few would be
    > able to follow in his footsteps would he be taken out of circulation.
    >
    > A suggestion: Consider also making a small (~50-100MB) /boot partition,
    > in case of corruption of the / (root) partition this allows you to
    > still boot and fix the root.


    I'm using ReiserFS on Ubuntu 7.10 and Mepis 7 with no problems. Also
    using XFS with openSuSE 10.3. Windows XP, well you know...

    --
    d.b. cooper
    ===========
    somewhere in oregon

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