How do I connect to Internet with dialup modem? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on How do I connect to Internet with dialup modem? - Ubuntu ; "John F. Morse" wrote in news:MzaHj.95494$cQ1.89134@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net: > pcbldrNinetyEight wrote: > >> Much of the help I've seen for Linux is too heavily reliant on the >> command line and is therefore useless to anyone whose prior >> experience comes from ...

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Thread: How do I connect to Internet with dialup modem?

  1. Re: How do I connect to Internet with dialup modem?

    "John F. Morse" wrote in
    news:MzaHj.95494$cQ1.89134@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:

    > pcbldrNinetyEight wrote:
    >
    >> Much of the help I've seen for Linux is too heavily reliant on the
    >> command line and is therefore useless to anyone whose prior
    >> experience comes from a GUI.

    >
    > Only useless to those who are too lazy to open a terminal and type (or
    > copy and paste) the command in verbatim. It's not a matter of being
    > ignorant, but lazy.
    >
    > You forget (or possibly don't yet know) that a GUI environment is
    > highly-customizable, and usually unknown by someone offering
    > assistance.
    >
    > OTOH, the terminal (CLI) commands are universal, not bound by any
    > particular GUI desktop environment or distro.
    >
    > I won't bother mentioning that the GUI pointy-clicky stuff actually
    > calls a CLI command, or some small range of possible command options.
    >
    > With that total control plus speed in mind, what do you have against
    > using something that is superior over a slow, crippled or incomplete
    > GUI?


    I chose to learn about Ubuntu because it is a GUI. For me the whole
    point of using Ubuntu is so that I need never resort to using a CLI.
    When I need help, I look for directions about how to use the GUI tools
    available in Ubuntu to accomplish my goal without resorting to a CLI. It
    is the lack of help (or insufficient help) with these tools that
    presents an obstacle to my progress with Linux. I suspect other newbies
    like myself switching from Windows or Mac encounter these same obstacles
    too. This is the point I was making.

    If you want to argue about whether or not the GUI is superior to the CLI
    or vise-versa then I refuse, such an argument would be pointless.

    --
    pcbldrNinetyEight

  2. Re: How do I connect to Internet with dialup modem?

    "John F. Morse" wrote:
    > pcbldrNinetyEight wrote:
    >
    >> Much of the help I've seen for Linux is too heavily reliant on
    >> the command line and is therefore useless to anyone whose prior
    >> experience comes from a GUI.

    >
    > Only useless to those who are too lazy to open a terminal and
    > type (or copy and paste) the command in verbatim. It's not a
    > matter of being ignorant, but lazy.
    >
    > You forget (or possibly don't yet know) that a GUI environment
    > is highly-customizable, and usually unknown by someone offering
    > assistance.
    >
    > OTOH, the terminal (CLI) commands are universal, not bound by
    > any particular GUI desktop environment or distro.
    >
    > I won't bother mentioning that the GUI pointy-clicky stuff
    > actually calls a CLI command, or some small range of possible
    > command options.
    >
    > With that total control plus speed in mind, what do you have
    > against using something that is superior over a slow, crippled
    > or incomplete GUI?


    A pretty accurate summary.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  3. Re: How do I connect to Internet with dialup modem?

    pcbldrNinetyEight wrote:

    >"C.Joseph S. Drayton" wrote in
    >news:xn0fo0tmk123dec005@news.sunsite.dk:
    >
    >> pcbldrNinetyEight wrote:
    >>
    >>>Gordon wrote in
    >>>news:64gt1oF2c4r2aU1@mid.individual.net:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2008-03-20, pcbldrNinetyEight wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> [snip]
    >>>>
    >>>> Linux tends to be short of documentation...
    >>>
    >>>My point as previously stated. Good or adequate documentation
    >>>saves time and frustration, it enables newcomers to help
    >>>themselves and encourages others to adopt Linux. Poor
    >>>documentation or a lack of documentation has the opposite effect.
    >>>Having said that I'm not complaining too emphatically. After all
    >>>it is created by volunteers and costs the user nothing. I only
    >>>point out that as a beginner I surely would have benefited from
    >>>better documentation.

    >>
    >> As a programmer, I have to admit that poor documentation is
    >>normally the fault of the programmer. Most programmers tend to be
    >>computer savvy and as a result will take for granted that the user
    >>is as computer savvy as they are.
    >>
    >> The second part of the problem is that most programmers have their
    >>own style and the way they use their computer. So they make
    >>assumptions about what the user will see and how they will see it.
    >>
    >> Recently I wrote a small launch-app/note-pad for my room-mate. It
    >>took me about 3 hours to write the database program. I then spent
    >>about 35 hours writing the help file . . . he still does not know
    >>how to use the database completely. The binary is 500KB and the
    >>help file is 2.1MB .

    >
    >Based on my own experiences writing procedures (aka help files) for my
    >wife and associates I can say without doubt that it is no easy task.
    >Writing help files is an art form unto it's self.
    >
    >I suspect some apps have failed to gain acceptance due to poorly
    >written documentation or documentation that is inappropriate for the
    >intended audience. I'm not critizing your skills, I'm speaking about
    >software help in general.
    >
    >I'd say it's knowledgeable users who create the most useful
    >documentation. Those who are able to visualize what a new user
    >experiences when trying to come to grips with new concepts (some of
    >which may be completely foreign to new users) will succeed in creating
    >useful documentation.
    >
    >Much of the help I've seen for Linux is too heavily reliant on the
    >command line and is therefore useless to anyone whose prior experience
    >comes from a GUI.


    I think you're right about knowledgable user being able to write better
    quality help files than the programmers.

    That being the case maybe the Linux community might start a group of
    volunteers (of knowledgeable users) who work with the programming
    projects to write the help files that would go with the application.

    I have to admit, I know that my applications need documentation and
    help files, but that seems to be the VERY last thing I work on when
    writing an application. If the help file writers were working in
    conjuction with the application programmers, there might even be cases
    where the help file writer could make suggestions on the interface
    based on usage by the 'common user'.

    --

    Sincerely,
    C.Joseph Drayton, Ph.D. AS&T

    CSD Computer Services
    Web site: http://csdcs.tlerma.com/
    E-mail: csdcs@tlerma.com

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