How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon - Ubuntu ; Hi, From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM. I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to auto-start when I ...

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Thread: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

  1. How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    Hi,
    From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.

    I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions, setting
    the command as /vmware

    I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance for help.
    Chris


  2. Re: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    It is a little hard to believe that vmwave executable lives under the
    root directory, as filename /vmware implies. Could it be that you need
    to enter something like /usr/bin/vmware?

    i

    On 2008-03-19, Chrisfc wrote:
    > Hi,
    > From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    > this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.
    >
    > I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    > auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions, setting
    > the command as /vmware
    >
    > I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for help.
    > Chris
    >


  3. Re: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    Chrisfc wrote:
    > Hi,
    > From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    > this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.
    >
    > I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    > auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions, setting
    > the command as /vmware
    >
    > I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for help.
    > Chris
    >

    try a dot: ./vmware

  4. Re: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    Derek Turner writes:

    > Chrisfc wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >> From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    >> this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.
    >>
    >> I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    >> auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions,
    >> setting the command as /vmware
    >>
    >> I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for help.
    >> Chris
    >>

    > try a dot: ./vmware


    "." means current directory. Pretty meaningless when running as a
    session program.

    I would question whether you are right when you say "/vmware"
    worked. You have vmware installed in your root directory?

    What you should type is the full pathname and program name e.g

    /home/hadron/bin/vmware


  5. Re: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 12:09:01 GMT, Chrisfc
    wrote:

    >Hi,
    > From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    >this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.
    >
    >I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    >auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions, setting
    >the command as /vmware
    >
    >I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?
    >
    >Thanks in advance for help.
    >Chris


    On a seemingly related note... Is ist better to install vmware first,
    before any other operating system? Or do i install Ubuntu, then enable
    it it when Ubuntu is up and running?

    confused in the states

    Chris

  6. Re: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    Flash writes:

    > On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 12:09:01 GMT, Chrisfc
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Hi,
    >> From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    >>this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.
    >>
    >>I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    >>auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions, setting
    >>the command as /vmware
    >>
    >>I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?
    >>
    >>Thanks in advance for help.
    >>Chris

    >
    > On a seemingly related note... Is ist better to install vmware first,
    > before any other operating system? Or do i install Ubuntu, then enable
    > it it when Ubuntu is up and running?
    >
    > confused in the states
    >
    > Chris


    VMWare is a program that runs under an OS. Install your Ubuntu and then
    install VMware.

    Google will help.

    ps the post above is wrong. See the other posts in the thread.


    --
    as aj would say, waiting always works
    either what you want happens, or you die and cannot be
    perturbed anymore
    the trouble with this philosophy is that aj sincerely
    believes it

  7. Re: How to configure Vmware to auto start on logon

    Flash wrote:
    > On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 12:09:01 GMT, Chrisfc
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >> From the command line, typing '/vmware' launches vmware server. I'd like
    >> this to auto-run when I log on so I can automatically power up a VM.
    >>
    >> I therefore added a startup option for VMware server to
    >> auto-start when I log on through System->Preferences->Sessions, setting
    >> the command as /vmware
    >>
    >> I logged on and didn't work, unfortunately. Any suggestions?
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for help.
    >> Chris

    >
    > On a seemingly related note... Is ist better to install vmware first,
    > before any other operating system? Or do i install Ubuntu, then enable
    > it it when Ubuntu is up and running?
    >
    > confused in the states
    >
    > Chris

    Since VMware is not a operating system you must first install either
    Linux or MS windows as the operating system and than VMware.

    Frank

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