Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market." - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market." - Ubuntu ; * Frank peremptorily fired off this memo: > The Ghost In The Machine wrote: >> >> I'm open to suggestions. One possibility is to use a >> charter similar to alt.fan.bill-gates, which is filled >> with chatter (last I looked; ...

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Thread: Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

  1. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    * Frank peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >>
    >> I'm open to suggestions. One possibility is to use a
    >> charter similar to alt.fan.bill-gates, which is filled
    >> with chatter (last I looked; I've not been in there in
    >> quite some time) which usually excoriates, vilifies,
    >> or disdains him and his alleged OS, or compares him to
    >> a garden pest, or (usually) both.
    >>

    > Ah yes...the collective wisdom of idiots, morons and imbeciles.
    > Wonderful!
    > Frank


    Idiot. See you in Hell, dude.

    --
    The best way to prepare [to be a programmer] is to write programs, and to
    study great programs that other people have written. In my case, I went to
    the garbage cans at the Computer Science Center and fished out listings of
    their operating system.
    -- Bill Gates

  2. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to saythat this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Linonut wrote:
    > * Frank peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >
    >>The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm open to suggestions. One possibility is to use a
    >>>charter similar to alt.fan.bill-gates, which is filled
    >>>with chatter (last I looked; I've not been in there in
    >>>quite some time) which usually excoriates, vilifies,
    >>>or disdains him and his alleged OS, or compares him to
    >>>a garden pest, or (usually) both.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Ah yes...the collective wisdom of idiots, morons and imbeciles.
    >>Wonderful!
    >>Frank

    >
    >
    > Idiot. See you in Hell, dude.
    >

    hehehe...ya'think...LOL?
    Frank

  3. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Frank wrote:

    >LOL!


    *plonk*


  4. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to saythat this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Frank wrote:
    > Josef Moellers wrote:
    >
    >> Frank wrote:
    >>
    >>> The Ghost In The Machine wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >>>> What exactly would you have us do?
    >>>>
    >>>> [1] Advocate switching to Microsoft Windows Vista?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> That would be the very best thing to do. Problem is, you'd have to
    >>> actually pay for it.

    >>
    >>
    >> And replace one *huge* piece of software that has a couple of rough
    >> edges here and there with one that the manufacturer admits is not
    >> actually ready (cf.
    >> blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/microsoft/library/vistaone3046.pdf )
    >> but that you have to pay big bucks for?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Anything, even a yellow legal pad and pencil is better than that POS toy
    > os urbuttoo...LOL!


    Glad I don't use "ubuttoo". Never heard of it, actually.

    From you response I infer that you don't have any arguments to counter
    my response and all you can resort to is some kind of gibberish.

    Thanks.
    --
    These are my personal views and not those of Fujitsu Siemens Computers!
    Josef Möllers (Pinguinpfleger bei FSC)
    If failure had no penalty success would not be a prize (T. Pratchett)
    Company Details: http://www.fujitsu-siemens.com/imprint.html

  5. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."


    IIRC, as a Winduhs user I had the following problems at one time or another
    on the XP version preinstalled on a Dell Inspiron laptop:

    Couldn't play .wmv movies on Netscape, and couldn't play .mpg movies on
    Explorer (or the reverse), so had to keep both at the ready.

    Certain sites were off limits due to uncontrollable window spawning and
    other takeover activity.

    Memory leaks led to instability after a number of hours, requiring a reboot
    at least every other day.

    Required expensive av subscription, not to mention malware and firewall
    software. Required time consuming scans.

    Freeware was often poorly coded, and buggy.

    Limited console utility -- most everything required point and click
    interface.

    I could go on. In fact I had to finally switch to Linux to keep from
    pulling my hair out.

    My point is that even the de facto standard OS is so far from perfect as to
    render your point moot.

    *R* *H*
    --
    AWAKE! FEAR! FIRE! FOES! AWAKE!
    FEAR! FIRE! FOES!
    AWAKE! AWAKE!
    -- J. R. R. Tolkien

  6. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to saythat this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    On Mon, 03 Mar 2008 17:04:54 -0800, The Ghost In The Machine wrote:



    Not sure who you are talking to - seems I only get one side of the
    conversation. Did someone fart or was there a simultaneous cranial
    implosion on the part of a few trolls who were plonked long ago?

    Have a nice day.

    freecode

  7. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."


    "Josef Moellers" wrote in message
    news:fqm95v$66d$1@nntp.fujitsu-siemens.com...
    > Frank wrote:
    >> Josef Moellers wrote:
    >>
    >>> Frank wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>> What exactly would you have us do?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> [1] Advocate switching to Microsoft Windows Vista?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> That would be the very best thing to do. Problem is, you'd have to
    >>>> actually pay for it.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> And replace one *huge* piece of software that has a couple of rough
    >>> edges here and there with one that the manufacturer admits is not
    >>> actually ready (cf.
    >>> blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/microsoft/library/vistaone3046.pdf )
    >>> but that you have to pay big bucks for?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Anything, even a yellow legal pad and pencil is better than that POS toy
    >> os urbuttoo...LOL!

    >
    > Glad I don't use "ubuttoo". Never heard of it, actually.



    Hardly anyone has heard of Ubuntu either. And that's the "most popular"
    distro.


    > From you response I infer that you don't have any arguments to counter my
    > response and all you can resort to is some kind of gibberish.




    > Thanks.
    > --
    > These are my personal views and not those of Fujitsu Siemens Computers!
    > Josef Möllers (Pinguinpfleger bei FSC)
    > If failure had no penalty success would not be a prize (T. Pratchett)
    > Company Details: http://www.fujitsu-siemens.com/imprint.html




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  8. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    CMD.EXE)

    Windows Vista is not really ready either.

    XP and Mac arethe only two things ready for desktop, but XP is bring
    phased out.

    However, Linux and Ubuntu has made a lot of progress and in a year or
    so, it will be ready. (meaning that a user would never need to run bash
    and things would work smoothly).

    Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    does not always cover 100%.

    i

  9. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."


    "Ignoramus30927" wrote in message
    news:zL6dnY6LiK1ug3zanZ2dnUVZ_s6mnZ2d@giganews.com ...
    > Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    > for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    > CMD.EXE)
    >
    > Windows Vista is not really ready either.


    Interesting claim since about 10% of the desktops in the world are running
    Vista.


    > XP and Mac arethe only two things ready for desktop, but XP is bring
    > phased out.


    "XP is being phased out" - I wouldn't count on it. It's actually 'more
    work' for MS to phase out XP then to keep things the way they are. Sure
    they've sent some floaters out to the press saying it would be phased out
    to see what the public reaction would be. But MS didn't get to where they
    are by being stupid and there's no way they are going to phase out XP. You
    can count on it.


    > However, Linux and Ubuntu has made a lot of progress and in a year or
    > so, it will be ready. (meaning that a user would never need to run bash
    > and things would work smoothly).


    How many years now have we been hearing this? Wasn't 1999 supposed to be
    the year of the linux desktop?


    > Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    > run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    > does not always cover 100%.


    It's getting better. But there's still no "compelling reason" for the
    average user to switch. Look at it from the perspective of your typical
    Joe. For all it's warts and all, they know Windows. They have to give up
    years of experience and knowledge, give up nearly all of their favorite
    apps in order to switch to linux. And what exactly do they get in return?
    To most people, it's simply not worth the switch.


    >
    > i




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  10. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Ignoramus30927 writes:

    > Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    > for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    > CMD.EXE)


    I would disagree. The best by far is Debian. There really is not that
    much difference between them - and the debian installer is a LOT better
    than 2 years ago.

    >
    > Windows Vista is not really ready either.
    >
    > XP and Mac arethe only two things ready for desktop, but XP is bring
    > phased out.
    >
    > However, Linux and Ubuntu has made a lot of progress and in a year or
    > so, it will be ready. (meaning that a user would never need to run bash
    > and things would work smoothly).


    People have been saying that for years. It will never be the case
    IMO. And, to be honest, I dont necessarily think it should be the case.

    >
    > Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    > run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    > does not always cover 100%.
    >
    > i


    It's a moving target - nothing ever will.

  11. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    On 2008-03-19, Hadron wrote:
    > Ignoramus30927 writes:
    >
    >> Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    >> for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    >> CMD.EXE)

    >
    > I would disagree. The best by far is Debian. There really is not that
    > much difference between them - and the debian installer is a LOT better
    > than 2 years ago.


    I tried Debian and it would not "do it" for me because it was just too
    old (did not support some hardware I had). Otherwise I liked it a
    lot.

    >>
    >> Windows Vista is not really ready either.
    >>
    >> XP and Mac arethe only two things ready for desktop, but XP is bring
    >> phased out.
    >>
    >> However, Linux and Ubuntu has made a lot of progress and in a year or
    >> so, it will be ready. (meaning that a user would never need to run bash
    >> and things would work smoothly).

    >
    > People have been saying that for years. It will never be the case
    > IMO. And, to be honest, I dont necessarily think it should be the
    > case.


    Well, the progress is there. Very substantial, in fact.

    >>
    >> Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    >> run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    >> does not always cover 100%.

    >
    > It's a moving target - nothing ever will.


    I have a kid using Linux, at home, and he is fine doing his kid stuff.

    (games, movies and websites)

    That's a good sign.

    i

  12. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Ignoramus30927 writes:

    > On 2008-03-19, Hadron wrote:
    >> Ignoramus30927 writes:
    >>
    >>> Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    >>> for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    >>> CMD.EXE)

    >>
    >> I would disagree. The best by far is Debian. There really is not that
    >> much difference between them - and the debian installer is a LOT better
    >> than 2 years ago.

    >
    > I tried Debian and it would not "do it" for me because it was just too
    > old (did not support some hardware I had). Otherwise I liked it a
    > lot.


    Did you try testing? HPT doesn't understand what Etch and Lenny are, but
    you will when you read up on it. There is even unstable for those on the
    edge...

    >
    >>>
    >>> Windows Vista is not really ready either.
    >>>
    >>> XP and Mac arethe only two things ready for desktop, but XP is bring
    >>> phased out.
    >>>
    >>> However, Linux and Ubuntu has made a lot of progress and in a year or
    >>> so, it will be ready. (meaning that a user would never need to run bash
    >>> and things would work smoothly).

    >>
    >> People have been saying that for years. It will never be the case
    >> IMO. And, to be honest, I dont necessarily think it should be the
    >> case.

    >
    > Well, the progress is there. Very substantial, in fact.


    I thought so for a while and then I realized its only because I "live in
    Linux" now. Nearly no one I know uses it. Those I installed it for have
    switched back to Windows because they need Windows for certain SW and
    couldn't see the need to dual boot - basically Linux gave them nothing
    that they didn't have under Windows. Sure, they are not techies or
    programmers AND they dont have all these imaginary issues that COLA
    idiots keep harping on about.

    And the figures simply do not back you up.

    Linux is losing ground in the server market. There is hardly any
    increase in desktop browsing stats. Even Rexx acknowledges that less
    than 1% of Linux users use solely Linux.

    >
    >>>
    >>> Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    >>> run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    >>> does not always cover 100%.

    >>
    >> It's a moving target - nothing ever will.

    >
    > I have a kid using Linux, at home, and he is fine doing his kid stuff.
    >
    > (games, movies and websites)
    >
    > That's a good sign.
    >
    > i


    Then he must be a young kid - because good modern games rarely run on
    Linux.

    I watch all my movies on Linux too - works brilliantly. I even use my
    main development machine which has 3 external USB drives to share my
    multimedia drive via nfs on my wireless so that I cant watch movies in
    my bedroom on the laptop should I get the urge.

    One of the best reasons for having my setup is the way rsync and rsnapshot
    work over ssh. It is irreplaceable. I have a cron job on my main
    machine which backs up my itself, my laptop, and my web/mailserver using
    rsnapshot over wireless to sync up and keep multiple hour/day/week/month
    snapshots on an external USB drive. All using public key access. I have
    no idea if this would work on XP.

    --
    "At BT Global, our crown jewels are the services we supply to our
    customers. With jNetX we own the intellectual property for our
    services, allowing us to evolve the services as and when required."

    Mark Kent
    Head of Technology Strategy

  13. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Ezekiel wrote:

    >
    >Windows XP set for early retirement
    >By Gregg Keizer, Computerworld
    >
    >According to Microsoft's posted timetable, the company will stop licensing
    >Windows XP to OEMs and terminate retail sales of the operating system 31
    >January, 2008.
    >

    >
    >So supposedly MS stopped licensing XP to OEM's a month and a half ago. Yet
    >every OEM site that I go to (Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, etc) all have XP
    >machines for sale. How can that be if MS discontinued XP?


    Umm... They moved the end-date to this Summer. That's old news, and
    does not prove that they will move the end-date again.

    Can you at least try to argue honestly?


  14. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    On 2008-03-19, Hadron wrote:
    > Ignoramus30927 writes:
    >
    >> On 2008-03-19, Hadron wrote:
    >>> Ignoramus30927 writes:
    >>>
    >>>> Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    >>>> for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    >>>> CMD.EXE)
    >>>
    >>> I would disagree. The best by far is Debian. There really is not that
    >>> much difference between them - and the debian installer is a LOT better
    >>> than 2 years ago.

    >>
    >> I tried Debian and it would not "do it" for me because it was just too
    >> old (did not support some hardware I had). Otherwise I liked it a
    >> lot.

    >
    > Did you try testing? HPT doesn't understand what Etch and Lenny are, but
    > you will when you read up on it. There is even unstable for those on the
    > edge...


    I did not try testing. But I liked Ubuntu better. It is like testing
    but professionally managed.

    >>
    >> Well, the progress is there. Very substantial, in fact.

    >
    > I thought so for a while and then I realized its only because I
    > "live in Linux" now. Nearly no one I know uses it. Those I installed
    > it for have switched back to Windows because they need Windows for
    > certain SW and couldn't see the need to dual boot - basically Linux
    > gave them nothing that they didn't have under Windows. Sure, they
    > are not techies or programmers AND they dont have all these
    > imaginary issues that COLA idiots keep harping on about.


    My parents have Windows and it is a total disaster. (they got ****ed
    and were sold "Windows ME").

    > And the figures simply do not back you up.
    >
    > Linux is losing ground in the server market. There is hardly any
    > increase in desktop browsing stats. Even Rexx acknowledges that less
    > than 1% of Linux users use solely Linux.


    I do not think that it is losing ground. Maybe I am missing
    something.

    >>
    >>>>
    >>>> Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    >>>> run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    >>>> does not always cover 100%.
    >>>
    >>> It's a moving target - nothing ever will.

    >>
    >> I have a kid using Linux, at home, and he is fine doing his kid stuff.
    >>
    >> (games, movies and websites)
    >>
    >> That's a good sign.
    >>
    >> i

    >
    > Then he must be a young kid - because good modern games rarely run on
    > Linux.


    I am sure that is true.

    > I watch all my movies on Linux too - works brilliantly. I even use my
    > main development machine which has 3 external USB drives to share my
    > multimedia drive via nfs on my wireless so that I cant watch movies in
    > my bedroom on the laptop should I get the urge.


    Almost exactly how I do it. The movies are on an NFS drive and are
    shared across the house (wired and wifi).

    > One of the best reasons for having my setup is the way rsync and
    > rsnapshot work over ssh. It is irreplaceable. I have a cron job on
    > my main machine which backs up my itself, my laptop, and my
    > web/mailserver using rsnapshot over wireless to sync up and keep
    > multiple hour/day/week/month snapshots on an external USB drive. All
    > using public key access. I have no idea if this would work on XP.
    >


    I believe that you can do ssh and rdiff-backup on windows. (from Cygwin)

    i

  15. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."


    "chrisv" wrote in message
    news:a5d2u3p0ghgqg2cuff63tcv2n2ic6ivfar@4ax.com...
    > Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Windows XP set for early retirement
    >>By Gregg Keizer, Computerworld
    >>
    >>According to Microsoft's posted timetable, the company will stop
    >>licensing
    >>Windows XP to OEMs and terminate retail sales of the operating system 31
    >>January, 2008.
    >>

    >>
    >>So supposedly MS stopped licensing XP to OEM's a month and a half ago.
    >>Yet
    >>every OEM site that I go to (Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, etc) all have
    >>XP
    >>machines for sale. How can that be if MS discontinued XP?

    >
    > Umm... They moved the end-date to this Summer. That's old news, and
    > does not prove that they will move the end-date again.


    But MS is already "hinting" they may extend it again.



    http://www.infoworld.com/article/08/...crosoft_1.html



    Microsoft responds to "Save XP" petition
    Company says *** it will listen to customers ***, cites earlier XP
    extension

    The spokesperson noted that Microsoft had already delayed XP's demise by
    six months from its original Dec. 31, 2007, end-of-sales date, as software
    vendors, customers, and others complained that the deadline was too soon,
    coming less than a year after Windows Vista's release. "That's what
    informed our decision to extend the availability of XP initially and what
    will continue to guide us," she said.




    > Can you at least try to argue honestly?


    It was honest. I don't know what the official end date is. I searched
    Google and the first few hits returned articles mentioning this date. Was I
    supposed to search dozens of more articles to see if it changed? Learn the
    difference between dishonesty and an unintentional mistake.




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  16. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Ignoramus30927 writes:

    > On 2008-03-19, Hadron wrote:
    >> Ignoramus30927 writes:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-03-19, Hadron wrote:
    >>>> Ignoramus30927 writes:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ubuntu is the best distro out there, and yes, it is not fully ready
    >>>>> for desktop. (meaning for dumb users who don't know what is bash or
    >>>>> CMD.EXE)
    >>>>
    >>>> I would disagree. The best by far is Debian. There really is not that
    >>>> much difference between them - and the debian installer is a LOT better
    >>>> than 2 years ago.
    >>>
    >>> I tried Debian and it would not "do it" for me because it was just too
    >>> old (did not support some hardware I had). Otherwise I liked it a
    >>> lot.

    >>
    >> Did you try testing? HPT doesn't understand what Etch and Lenny are, but
    >> you will when you read up on it. There is even unstable for those on the
    >> edge...

    >
    > I did not try testing. But I liked Ubuntu better. It is like testing
    > but professionally managed.
    >
    >>>
    >>> Well, the progress is there. Very substantial, in fact.

    >>
    >> I thought so for a while and then I realized its only because I
    >> "live in Linux" now. Nearly no one I know uses it. Those I installed
    >> it for have switched back to Windows because they need Windows for
    >> certain SW and couldn't see the need to dual boot - basically Linux
    >> gave them nothing that they didn't have under Windows. Sure, they
    >> are not techies or programmers AND they dont have all these
    >> imaginary issues that COLA idiots keep harping on about.

    >
    > My parents have Windows and it is a total disaster. (they got ****ed
    > and were sold "Windows ME").


    That is ANCIENT. Ubuntu didn't even exist then. So fair is fair.

    >
    >> And the figures simply do not back you up.
    >>
    >> Linux is losing ground in the server market. There is hardly any
    >> increase in desktop browsing stats. Even Rexx acknowledges that less
    >> than 1% of Linux users use solely Linux.

    >
    > I do not think that it is losing ground. Maybe I am missing
    > something.


    You are : the figures. IIS is growing as Apache is falling. And this
    considering that Apache runs on Windows too.

    >
    >>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Even now, Ubuntu is not in a bad shape and a user can set it up, and
    >>>>> run stuff without doing any shell work -- but it is not smooth yet and
    >>>>> does not always cover 100%.
    >>>>
    >>>> It's a moving target - nothing ever will.
    >>>
    >>> I have a kid using Linux, at home, and he is fine doing his kid stuff.
    >>>
    >>> (games, movies and websites)
    >>>
    >>> That's a good sign.
    >>>
    >>> i

    >>
    >> Then he must be a young kid - because good modern games rarely run on
    >> Linux.

    >
    > I am sure that is true.
    >
    >> I watch all my movies on Linux too - works brilliantly. I even use my
    >> main development machine which has 3 external USB drives to share my
    >> multimedia drive via nfs on my wireless so that I cant watch movies in
    >> my bedroom on the laptop should I get the urge.

    >
    > Almost exactly how I do it. The movies are on an NFS drive and are
    > shared across the house (wired and wifi).
    >
    >> One of the best reasons for having my setup is the way rsync and
    >> rsnapshot work over ssh. It is irreplaceable. I have a cron job on
    >> my main machine which backs up my itself, my laptop, and my
    >> web/mailserver using rsnapshot over wireless to sync up and keep
    >> multiple hour/day/week/month snapshots on an external USB drive. All
    >> using public key access. I have no idea if this would work on XP.
    >>

    >
    > I believe that you can do ssh and rdiff-backup on windows. (from Cygwin)
    >
    > i


    --
    "At BT Global, our crown jewels are the services we supply to our
    customers. With jNetX we own the intellectual property for our
    services, allowing us to evolve the services as and when required."

    Mark Kent
    Head of Technology Strategy

  17. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Hadron wrote:

    > > My parents have Windows and it is a total disaster. (they got
    > > ****ed and were sold "Windows ME").

    >
    > That is ANCIENT. Ubuntu didn't even exist then. So fair is fair.


    Your bias is showing. You have no way of knowing that because you
    don't know how many copies of ME might still be in circulation or
    sold pre-installed on "garage sale" equipment.

    > > I do not think that it is losing ground. Maybe I am missing
    > > something.

    >
    > You are : the figures. IIS is growing as Apache is falling. And
    > this considering that Apache runs on Windows too.


    Now you hold up your dishonesty for everyone to see.

    Netcraft and Port80 not only consistently contradict each other, but
    also themselves when it comes to their "big picture" of what runs
    the WWW. And they both admit their methods are horribly flawed.

    Why that's a fact is obvious even to someone like you, but you'll
    never admit it because it flies in the fact of your Windroid
    agenda. The problem is, as anyone can read in the literature
    provided by the aforementioned organizations themselves, that it's
    next to impossible to get a valid sampling of the web itself let
    alone poll it accurately for any significant results in this
    context. About the only semi-truthful conclusion that can be drawn
    from their surveys, according to both of them as a matter of fact,
    is that Apache servers probably oughtnumber IIS servers by about
    3.5 to 1, and that this statistic mysteriously fluctuates in a
    seemingly random fashion every time it's compiled.

    On the odd chance that readers may be taken in by your nonsense,
    here's a couple references to help clear things up. Enjoy!

    http://www.port80software.com/survey...vers/relevance

    http://4sysops.com/archives/apache-v...re-statistics/


  18. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."


    "Nomen Nescio" wrote in message
    news:9874ca557d6d73495fecc6472b1b8c0e@dizum.com...
    > Hadron wrote:
    >
    >> > My parents have Windows and it is a total disaster. (they got
    >> > ****ed and were sold "Windows ME").

    >>
    >> That is ANCIENT. Ubuntu didn't even exist then. So fair is fair.

    >
    > Your bias is showing. You have no way of knowing that because you
    > don't know how many copies of ME might still be in circulation or
    > sold pre-installed on "garage sale" equipment.
    >
    >> > I do not think that it is losing ground. Maybe I am missing
    >> > something.

    >>
    >> You are : the figures. IIS is growing as Apache is falling. And
    >> this considering that Apache runs on Windows too.

    >
    > Now you hold up your dishonesty for everyone to see.
    >
    > Netcraft and Port80 not only consistently contradict each other, but
    > also themselves when it comes to their "big picture" of what runs
    > the WWW. And they both admit their methods are horribly flawed.


    So a couple of years ago when Apache usage was growing these stats were all
    and good and touted as a testiment for OSS and Apache. But now that the same
    stats from the same companies using the same methodology show otherwise they
    are suddenly "horribly flawed."




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  19. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 15:54:16 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > "Nomen Nescio" wrote in message
    > news:9874ca557d6d73495fecc6472b1b8c0e@dizum.com...
    >> Hadron wrote:
    >>
    >>> > My parents have Windows and it is a total disaster. (they got
    >>> > ****ed and were sold "Windows ME").
    >>>
    >>> That is ANCIENT. Ubuntu didn't even exist then. So fair is fair.

    >>
    >> Your bias is showing. You have no way of knowing that because you
    >> don't know how many copies of ME might still be in circulation or
    >> sold pre-installed on "garage sale" equipment.
    >>
    >>> > I do not think that it is losing ground. Maybe I am missing
    >>> > something.
    >>>
    >>> You are : the figures. IIS is growing as Apache is falling. And
    >>> this considering that Apache runs on Windows too.

    >>
    >> Now you hold up your dishonesty for everyone to see.
    >>
    >> Netcraft and Port80 not only consistently contradict each other, but
    >> also themselves when it comes to their "big picture" of what runs
    >> the WWW. And they both admit their methods are horribly flawed.

    >
    > So a couple of years ago when Apache usage was growing these stats were all
    > and good and touted as a testiment for OSS and Apache. But now that the same
    > stats from the same companies using the same methodology show otherwise they
    > are suddenly "horribly flawed."


    It's classic Linux advocacy.

    Linux is the kernel.
    Linux is not the kernel.
    Linux desktop usage can be measured.
    Linux desktop usage can't be measured.
    Gartner are Microsoft shills.
    Gartner is great when "insert your favorable to Linux Gartner report here".

    Linux advocacy is more about changing the rules than it is about facts.


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  20. Re: Even Mark Shuttleworth admits - "It would be reasonable to say that this (Linux) is not ready for the mass market."

    Nomen Nescio writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >
    >> > My parents have Windows and it is a total disaster. (they got
    >> > ****ed and were sold "Windows ME").

    >>
    >> That is ANCIENT. Ubuntu didn't even exist then. So fair is fair.

    >
    > Your bias is showing. You have no way of knowing that because you
    > don't know how many copies of ME might still be in circulation or
    > sold pre-installed on "garage sale" equipment.


    Wow. You really are as stupid as I first guessed. If I buy a Picasso, is
    that new? No? What about a shrink wrapped copy of MS-DOS?


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