Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007? - Ubuntu ; Tim Smith wrote: > Christopher Hunter wrote: > >> Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy >> of a final year computer science project written by a guy called >> Chris Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it ...

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Thread: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

  1. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    Tim Smith wrote:
    > Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >
    >> Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy
    >> of a final year computer science project written by a guy called
    >> Chris Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it (Turnbull was /giving/
    >> copies to his friends) and put an MS badge on it...
    >>
    >> The rest is unfortunate history!

    >
    > Odd how no one else ever heard the above story. How did you
    > acquire your unique knowledge of this event?


    And I seriously doubt it. MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly
    code, and the time periods involved didn't even allow such a
    development and theft. The tale is obviously worthless
    scuttlebutt. Bill wanted to be compensated for his efforts. He
    was.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  2. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    On Sun, 24 Feb 2008 23:29:53 +0000, Roger Blake wrote:

    > In article <6amwj.177686$3m6.39821@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk>, Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >>
    >> OK. Credit where credit's due: MS made point 'n click ('n drool!)
    >> computing available to the masses.

    >
    > Which came first -- the Mac, or a usable version of Windows?


    "to the masses", not some cult full of Oxfords (shudder).

    --
    It's bad luck to be superstitious.



  3. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    Tim Smith wrote:

    > In article ,
    > Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >> Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy of a
    >> final year computer science project written by a guy called Chris
    >> Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it (Turnbull was /giving/ copies to his
    >> friends) and put an MS badge on it...
    >>
    >> The rest is unfortunate history!

    >
    > Odd how no one else ever heard the above story. How did you acquire
    > your unique knowledge of this event?


    I was a member of the Palo Alto computer club at the time. Chris gave us
    all cassettes of Altair basic. Bill visited a few weeks later and tried to
    SELL us all copies.

    C.


  4. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    CBFalconer wrote:

    > And I seriously doubt it.


    You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.

    > MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,


    *Wrong!* What a fool.

    The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was about five
    years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole Chris's programme,
    re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated, and then tried to hawk
    them around the computer clubs in California.

    > The tale is obviously worthless scuttlebutt.


    How wrong you are - it amply illustrates the theft, lies and deceit that
    have /always/ been at the centre of MS.

    > Bill wanted to be compensated for his efforts.


    He made *no* "efforts" whatsoever, apart from copying some cassettes and
    sticking on the labels. The MS corporation started out by stealing code,
    and has continued in the same manner ever since...

    C.


  5. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    Christopher Hunter writes:

    > CBFalconer wrote:
    >
    >> And I seriously doubt it.

    >
    > You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >
    >> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,

    >
    > *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >
    > The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was about five
    > years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole Chris's programme,
    > re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated, and then tried to hawk
    > them around the computer clubs in California.
    >
    >> The tale is obviously worthless scuttlebutt.

    >
    > How wrong you are - it amply illustrates the theft, lies and deceit that
    > have /always/ been at the centre of MS.
    >
    >> Bill wanted to be compensated for his efforts.

    >
    > He made *no* "efforts" whatsoever, apart from copying some cassettes and
    > sticking on the labels. The MS corporation started out by stealing code,
    > and has continued in the same manner ever since...


    Seriously, where do you get off posting these outrageous claims?

  6. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?



    "Christopher Hunter" wrote in message
    news:P%swj.102269$LD6.76663@fe3.news.blueyonder.co .uk...
    > CBFalconer wrote:
    >
    >> And I seriously doubt it.

    >
    > You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >
    >> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,

    >
    > *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >
    > The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was about
    > five
    > years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole Chris's programme,
    > re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated, and then tried to hawk
    > them around the computer clubs in California.


    The 8080 was an eight bit processor.. the second generation after the 4004.
    It was used a lot for running cpm.
    You remember cpm? the OS that was ripped off to make QDOS by whomever sold
    it to Bill.





  7. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 06:13:03 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote:

    > CBFalconer wrote:
    >
    >> And I seriously doubt it.

    >
    > You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >
    >> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,

    >
    > *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >
    > The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was about
    > five years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole Chris's
    > programme, re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated, and then
    > tried to hawk them around the computer clubs in California.


    The Altair most certainly did use the 8080. The 8080 was an eight bit
    microprocessor, The Intel 8088, which was used in the original IBM PC,
    was a 16 bit processor. The 8088 was a low cost version of the 8086, it
    used 8 bit external buses instead of 16 bit. The first Intel
    microprocessors were the 4004 (4 bits), the 4040 (improved 4004), the
    8008 (first 8 bit), the 8080 (second generation 8 bit), 8085 (improved
    8080), 8086 (first 16 bit), 8088 (low cost 8086).

  8. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    General Schvantzkopf writes:

    > On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 06:13:03 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >
    >> CBFalconer wrote:
    >>
    >>> And I seriously doubt it.

    >>
    >> You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >>
    >>> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,

    >>
    >> *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >>
    >> The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was about
    >> five years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole Chris's
    >> programme, re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated, and then
    >> tried to hawk them around the computer clubs in California.

    >
    > The Altair most certainly did use the 8080. The 8080 was an eight bit
    > microprocessor, The Intel 8088, which was used in the original IBM PC,
    > was a 16 bit processor. The 8088 was a low cost version of the 8086, it
    > used 8 bit external buses instead of 16 bit. The first Intel
    > microprocessors were the 4004 (4 bits), the 4040 (improved 4004), the
    > 8008 (first 8 bit), the 8080 (second generation 8 bit), 8085 (improved
    > 8080), 8086 (first 16 bit), 8088 (low cost 8086).


    Yes, we can all use google. Thank you Christopher.....

    Now, back to your conspiracy theories - would you defend your statements
    in a court of law? Just out of curiosity and all.

  9. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 07:35:13 -0600, General Schvantzkopf wrote:

    > On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 06:13:03 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >
    >> CBFalconer wrote:
    >>
    >>> And I seriously doubt it.

    >>
    >> You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >>
    >>> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,

    >>
    >> *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >>
    >> The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was about
    >> five years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole Chris's
    >> programme, re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated, and then
    >> tried to hawk them around the computer clubs in California.

    >
    > The Altair most certainly did use the 8080. The 8080 was an eight bit
    > microprocessor, The Intel 8088, which was used in the original IBM PC,
    > was a 16 bit processor. The 8088 was a low cost version of the 8086, it
    > used 8 bit external buses instead of 16 bit. The first Intel
    > microprocessors were the 4004 (4 bits), the 4040 (improved 4004), the
    > 8008 (first 8 bit), the 8080 (second generation 8 bit), 8085 (improved
    > 8080), 8086 (first 16 bit), 8088 (low cost 8086).


    You left out the Z80.

    I ran CP/M on a Z80 right up until the AT came out. It was one of the
    fastest Z80's on the market at the time, running at a screaming 12
    Mhz. My homebrew machine outperformed the early IBM-PC's so there was
    no reason to switch. I had dual 1.2 megabyte floppy drives, too,
    whereas the IBM-PC only had 360K. And I had a 5 megabyte hard drive,
    and 512 bytes of persistent core memory, 16 eight-bit I/O ports, 4
    12-bit D/A converters, and 4 12-bit A/D converters. The drives and
    core memory were of course surplus, but I'd designed and wire-wrapped
    everything else myself.

    For every hour of work that computer saved me, I probably spent 100
    hours designing, building, and programming it. But that's not the
    point.

  10. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 16:29:07 +0000, El Tux wrote:

    > On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 07:35:13 -0600, General Schvantzkopf wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 06:13:03 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >>
    >>> CBFalconer wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> And I seriously doubt it.
    >>>
    >>> You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >>>
    >>>> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,
    >>>
    >>> *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >>>
    >>> The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was
    >>> about five years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole
    >>> Chris's programme, re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated,
    >>> and then tried to hawk them around the computer clubs in California.

    >>
    >> The Altair most certainly did use the 8080. The 8080 was an eight bit
    >> microprocessor, The Intel 8088, which was used in the original IBM PC,
    >> was a 16 bit processor. The 8088 was a low cost version of the 8086, it
    >> used 8 bit external buses instead of 16 bit. The first Intel
    >> microprocessors were the 4004 (4 bits), the 4040 (improved 4004), the
    >> 8008 (first 8 bit), the 8080 (second generation 8 bit), 8085 (improved
    >> 8080), 8086 (first 16 bit), 8088 (low cost 8086).

    >
    > You left out the Z80.
    >
    > I ran CP/M on a Z80 right up until the AT came out. It was one of the
    > fastest Z80's on the market at the time, running at a screaming 12 Mhz.
    > My homebrew machine outperformed the early IBM-PC's so there was no
    > reason to switch. I had dual 1.2 megabyte floppy drives, too, whereas
    > the IBM-PC only had 360K. And I had a 5 megabyte hard drive, and 512
    > bytes of persistent core memory, 16 eight-bit I/O ports, 4 12-bit D/A
    > converters, and 4 12-bit A/D converters. The drives and core memory were
    > of course surplus, but I'd designed and wire-wrapped everything else
    > myself.
    >
    > For every hour of work that computer saved me, I probably spent 100
    > hours designing, building, and programming it. But that's not the point.
    >



    The Z80 wasn't an Intel product, it was from Zilog. Zilog was founded by
    some of the 8080 designers. The Z80 was the dominant 8 bit micro in the
    late 70s. One of the first systems I designed was a dual Z80 system at
    Data General in early 1977. It was a custom editing terminal for the LA
    Times that used one Z80 to run the editor and the other as a display
    processor (it moved text around and did searches while the main processor
    handled everything else). It may have been the worlds first multi-
    microprocessor system, although it certainly wasn't the first
    multiprocessor, the Illiac 4 supercomputer had 64 processors and that was
    done in the 1960s.

  11. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    General Schvantzkopf wrote:

    > The Altair most certainly did use the 8080.


    The early ones did - later ones (like the one /still/ in my cellar) used the
    Z80.

    C.

  12. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    El Tux wrote:

    > You left out the Z80.
    >
    > I ran CP/M on a Z80 right up until the AT came out. It was one of the
    > fastest Z80's on the market at the time, running at a screaming 12
    > Mhz. My homebrew machine outperformed the early IBM-PC's so there was
    > no reason to switch. I had dual 1.2 megabyte floppy drives, too,
    > whereas the IBM-PC only had 360K. And I had a 5 megabyte hard drive,
    > and 512 bytes of persistent core memory, 16 eight-bit I/O ports, 4
    > 12-bit D/A converters, and 4 12-bit A/D converters. The drives and
    > core memory were of course surplus, but I'd designed and wire-wrapped
    > everything else myself.
    >
    > For every hour of work that computer saved me, I probably spent 100
    > hours designing, building, and programming it. But that's not the
    > point.


    The richer amongst us bought North Star Horizon machines!

    C.


  13. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    General Schvantzkopf wrote:

    > On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 16:29:07 +0000, El Tux wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 07:35:13 -0600, General Schvantzkopf wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 06:13:03 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> CBFalconer wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> And I seriously doubt it.
    >>>>
    >>>> You can doubt what you like, double-sig fool.
    >>>>
    >>>>> MS Basic was written in 8080 assembly code,
    >>>>
    >>>> *Wrong!* What a fool.
    >>>>
    >>>> The Altair (that I was talking about) didn't use an 8080 - it was
    >>>> about five years /before/ the first 16-bit processors! Bill stole
    >>>> Chris's programme, re-badged it on cassettes the he had duplicated,
    >>>> and then tried to hawk them around the computer clubs in California.
    >>>
    >>> The Altair most certainly did use the 8080. The 8080 was an eight bit
    >>> microprocessor, The Intel 8088, which was used in the original IBM PC,
    >>> was a 16 bit processor. The 8088 was a low cost version of the 8086, it
    >>> used 8 bit external buses instead of 16 bit. The first Intel
    >>> microprocessors were the 4004 (4 bits), the 4040 (improved 4004), the
    >>> 8008 (first 8 bit), the 8080 (second generation 8 bit), 8085 (improved
    >>> 8080), 8086 (first 16 bit), 8088 (low cost 8086).

    >>
    >> You left out the Z80.
    >>
    >> I ran CP/M on a Z80 right up until the AT came out. It was one of the
    >> fastest Z80's on the market at the time, running at a screaming 12 Mhz.
    >> My homebrew machine outperformed the early IBM-PC's so there was no
    >> reason to switch. I had dual 1.2 megabyte floppy drives, too, whereas
    >> the IBM-PC only had 360K. And I had a 5 megabyte hard drive, and 512
    >> bytes of persistent core memory, 16 eight-bit I/O ports, 4 12-bit D/A
    >> converters, and 4 12-bit A/D converters. The drives and core memory were
    >> of course surplus, but I'd designed and wire-wrapped everything else
    >> myself.
    >>
    >> For every hour of work that computer saved me, I probably spent 100
    >> hours designing, building, and programming it. But that's not the point.
    >>

    >
    >
    > The Z80 wasn't an Intel product, it was from Zilog. Zilog was founded by
    > some of the 8080 designers. The Z80 was the dominant 8 bit micro in the
    > late 70s. One of the first systems I designed was a dual Z80 system at
    > Data General in early 1977. It was a custom editing terminal for the LA
    > Times that used one Z80 to run the editor and the other as a display
    > processor (it moved text around and did searches while the main processor
    > handled everything else). It may have been the worlds first multi-
    > microprocessor system, although it certainly wasn't the first
    > multiprocessor, the Illiac 4 supercomputer had 64 processors and that was
    > done in the 1960s.


    My brother was involved in the design and build of the original Fairlight
    keyboard instrument. The earliest versions (1978) used twin Z80s at ~8
    MHz.

    C.

  14. Old 8080 systems (was: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?)

    El Tux wrote:
    > General Schvantzkopf wrote:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >>
    >> The Altair most certainly did use the 8080. The 8080 was an
    >> eight bit microprocessor, The Intel 8088, which was used in the
    >> original IBM PC, was a 16 bit processor. The 8088 was a low cost
    >> version of the 8086, it used 8 bit external buses instead of 16
    >> bit. The first Intel microprocessors were the 4004 (4 bits), the
    >> 4040 (improved 4004), the 8008 (first 8 bit), the 8080 (second
    >> generation 8 bit), 8085 (improved 8080), 8086 (first 16 bit),
    >> 8088 (low cost 8086).

    >
    > You left out the Z80.
    >
    > I ran CP/M on a Z80 right up until the AT came out. It was one
    > of the fastest Z80's on the market at the time, running at a
    > screaming 12 Mhz. My homebrew machine outperformed the early
    > IBM-PC's so there was no reason to switch. I had dual 1.2
    > megabyte floppy drives, too, whereas the IBM-PC only had 360K.
    > And I had a 5 megabyte hard drive, and 512 bytes of persistent
    > core memory, 16 eight-bit I/O ports, 4 12-bit D/A converters,
    > and 4 12-bit A/D converters. The drives and core memory were
    > of course surplus, but I'd designed and wire-wrapped
    > everything else myself.
    >
    > For every hour of work that computer saved me, I probably spent
    > 100 hours designing, building, and programming it. But that's
    > not the point.


    This is getting highly OT for aolu, so I have cross-posted and set
    follow-ups.

    I had a similar path. I developed the 8080 system at the same time
    as the first Altair appeared. In fact, after about 6 months or so
    of development, the Altair appeared and I went to look at it. I
    rejected it for operation in our environment. Besides, mine was
    cheaper.

    However, after initial development on the 8080 the Z80 appeared. I
    didn't need its abilities, so I never developed another CPU card.
    (The buss had been generalized, so that was no problem). I never
    needed hard disks either, since I could use our mainframe for such
    long term storage, and local things could go on SSSD floppies. The
    primary purpose was cheap embedded systems in a medical testing
    lab, and the further efforts were on the languages used. I
    developed a full, ISO standard compliant Pascal system for it,
    which I could run under CPM or on the mainframe (a HP3000). The
    object code could run under CPM for testing, or stand-alone (with
    no opsys) in the labs, mounted on ROM chips. The only nuisance was
    that compilation under CP/M was much slower - a 2 minute job on the
    HP3000 was likely to take two hours.

    The Z80 actually gave some advantages in code size, but generally
    did not improve run-time significantly. For personal home use I
    had a Kaypro, and one of the first 1200 baud modems. That modem
    cost me over $400. But it gave me blinding communication speeds.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  15. Old 8080 systems (was: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?)

    General Schvantzkopf wrote:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > The Z80 wasn't an Intel product, it was from Zilog. Zilog was
    > founded by some of the 8080 designers. The Z80 was the dominant
    > 8 bit micro in the late 70s. One of the first systems I designed
    > was a dual Z80 system at Data General in early 1977. It was a
    > custom editing terminal for the LA Times that used one Z80 to
    > run the editor and the other as a display processor (it moved
    > text around and did searches while the main processor handled
    > everything else). It may have been the worlds first multi-
    > microprocessor system, although it certainly wasn't the first
    > multiprocessor, the Illiac 4 supercomputer had 64 processors
    > and that was done in the 1960s.


    Also cross-posted to alt.folklore.computers and f'ups set, because
    OT for a.o.l.u

    You weren't the first. I was designing an 8080 system for such
    operation about 1972 (just after the Fischer-Spassky match). It
    was for a PBX, which was crippled so far by using an 8008. One
    8080 handled the i/o to all the stations, and another was the
    operator etc. I had a war with the President, and moved to Yale.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  16. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    In article ,
    Christopher Hunter wrote:
    > > In article ,
    > > Christopher Hunter wrote:
    > >> Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy of a
    > >> final year computer science project written by a guy called Chris
    > >> Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it (Turnbull was /giving/ copies to his
    > >> friends) and put an MS badge on it...
    > >>
    > >> The rest is unfortunate history!

    > >
    > > Odd how no one else ever heard the above story. How did you acquire
    > > your unique knowledge of this event?

    >
    > I was a member of the Palo Alto computer club at the time. Chris gave us
    > all cassettes of Altair basic. Bill visited a few weeks later and tried to
    > SELL us all copies.


    You are some kind of attempt at parody, right? Some kind of performance
    art project, perhaps? Because it is not conceivable that anyone could
    actually be so clueless as to what was going on as you appear to be in
    the above.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  17. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    On 2008-02-25, Hadron wrote:
    > General Schvantzkopf writes:
    >> 8080), 8086 (first 16 bit), 8088 (low cost 8086).

    >
    > Yes, we can all use google. Thank you Christopher.....
    >
    > Now, back to your conspiracy theories - would you defend your statements
    > in a court of law? Just out of curiosity and all.


    Umm, that's not Christopher. Your newsreader could tell, why couldn't
    you?


    --
    Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
    joe at hits - buffalo dot com
    "Hate is baggage, life is too short to go around pissed off all the
    time..." - Danny, American History X

  18. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    "DFS" writes:

    > Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >
    >> Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy of a
    >> final year computer science project written by a guy called Chris
    >> Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it (Turnbull was /giving/ copies to his
    >> friends) and put an MS badge on it...
    >>
    >> The rest is unfortunate history!

    >
    > It's too bad Gates doesn't pay attention to little turds like you. It would
    > be *very* amusing to see you charged with libel and your meager wages
    > garnished to satisfy the terms of a settlement.
    >
    > Here's the actual history of MS Basic for the Altair:
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair_BASIC


    Chunt is a known liar and fraud. You are better off ignoring his tall
    tales. He thinks he invented Z80 too from what I can gather.


    --
    Bwahahahahahahahah - Anyone else think that this announcement from the MS
    marketing machine was anything other than a last ditch attempt to try and
    foster *some* interest in XP ?
    comp.os.linux.advocacy - where they put the lunacy in advocacy

  19. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    Christopher Hunter wrote:

    > Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy of a
    > final year computer science project written by a guy called Chris
    > Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it (Turnbull was /giving/ copies to his
    > friends) and put an MS badge on it...
    >
    > The rest is unfortunate history!


    It's too bad Gates doesn't pay attention to little turds like you. It would
    be *very* amusing to see you charged with libel and your meager wages
    garnished to satisfy the terms of a settlement.

    Here's the actual history of MS Basic for the Altair:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair_BASIC



  20. Re: Ubuntu 7.10 on Virtual PC 2007?

    Hadron wrote:

    > "DFS" writes:
    >
    >> Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >>
    >>> Not quite. "Microsoft Basic" for the Altair was actually a copy of a
    >>> final year computer science project written by a guy called Chris
    >>> Turnbull - Gates bootlegged it (Turnbull was /giving/ copies to his
    >>> friends) and put an MS badge on it...
    >>>
    >>> The rest is unfortunate history!

    >>
    >> It's too bad Gates doesn't pay attention to little turds like you. It
    >> would be *very* amusing to see you charged with libel and your meager
    >> wages garnished to satisfy the terms of a settlement.
    >>
    >> Here's the actual history of MS Basic for the Altair:
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair_BASIC

    >
    > Chunt is a known liar and fraud. You are better off ignoring his tall
    > tales. He thinks he invented Z80 too from what I can gather.
    >

    And you pretend to know the "right way" to be a Linux advocate. So I guess
    more than Chunt tell tall tales.

    Cheers.

    --
    The world can't afford the rich.

    Q: What OS is built for lusers?
    A: Which one requires running lusermgr.msc to create them?

    Francis (Frank) adds a new "gadget" to his Vista box ...
    Download it here: http://tinyurl.com/2hnof6



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