BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent - Ubuntu ; If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/ broadband/index.shtml So, if the BBC can do this ...

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Thread: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

  1. BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    broadband/index.shtml

    So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    out and give us what we want!!

    The BBC could have introduced this system instead of their stupid
    iPlayer. It's clear that they never had to go down the Microsoft-only
    road. The question is: why *did* the BBC create the iPlayer instead of
    the more widely usable solution?


    --

    "The dictionary of law is written by the bosses of order." - Abbie
    Hoffman


  2. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent



    "firebrand" wrote in message
    news:fp5n9t$gje$1@aioe.org...
    > If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    > Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    > youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    > broadband/index.shtml
    >
    > So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    > their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    > regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    > out and give us what we want!!
    >
    > The BBC could have introduced this system instead of their stupid
    > iPlayer. It's clear that they never had to go down the Microsoft-only
    > road. The question is: why *did* the BBC create the iPlayer instead of
    > the more widely usable solution?


    The streamed video is low quality and has been available for a while.
    They have different licensing requirements for high res downloads.
    If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay, the bbc has decided
    it can't afford time unlimited downloads hence the drm.
    You may not like it but welcome to the real world where material has a
    time/cost relationship..


  3. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    firebrand wrote:
    > If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    > Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    > youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    > broadband/index.shtml
    >
    > So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    > their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    > regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    > out and give us what we want!!
    >
    > The BBC could have introduced this system instead of their stupid
    > iPlayer. It's clear that they never had to go down the Microsoft-only
    > road. The question is: why *did* the BBC create the iPlayer instead of
    > the more widely usable solution?
    >
    >


    It is *independent* all the mayor platforms can stream iPlayer and they
    been able to from December 07, you just can't download the program.

    Ram

  4. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:

    > If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay


    Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't see
    why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get what we
    have all paid for.




  5. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    firebrand illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    > Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    > youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    > broadband/index.shtml
    >
    > So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    > their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    > regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    > out and give us what we want!!
    >
    > The BBC could have introduced this system instead of their stupid
    > iPlayer. It's clear that they never had to go down the Microsoft-only
    > road. The question is: why *did* the BBC create the iPlayer instead of
    > the more widely usable solution?


    They have. You can stream most of the content via flash and a browser.

    Just visit www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/
    Browse around and play the content you want to view.

    At this time though, there isn't a way to save it to disk.
    Keep your eye out for a browser extensions soon though. Someone will
    crack silicon.com's mechanism shortly.

    --
    Moog

    "If this is gonna be that kinda party I'm gonna stick my dick in the
    mashed potatoes"

  6. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 10:10:31 +0000, Robin T Cox wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >
    >> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay

    >
    > Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    > broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't see
    > why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get what we
    > have all paid for.


    It's a bit more limited than that. I wanted to see a Beeb programme, so
    cranked up my trusty old Win2000 machine, and it refused to allow iPlayer
    on that. Only XP and Vista machines are catered for. Same goes for the
    4OD service. Presumably because the older versions of Windows don't
    support DRM.

    Keith

  7. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:43:03 +0000, Ram wrote:

    > It is *independent* all the mayor platforms can stream iPlayer and they
    > been able to from December 07, you just can't download the program.


    It's only recently for me that BBC can go full screen, in the same way
    YouTubby does now in FF. Up until a couple of weeks ago I had to boot into
    Windows or use a virtual machine to see full screen streamed (let alone
    downloaded) or else watch in tiny window in Linux.

    --
    Some say that Pamela Anderson wouldn't be anybody without her tits.
    That's simply not true, she'd be Paris Hilton
    - Sarah Silverman


  8. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent



    "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    news:rEytj.537$ay3.116@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
    > On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >
    >> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay

    >
    > Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    > broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't see
    > why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get what we
    > have all paid for.
    >
    >
    >


    So you have two choices.. get a platform that works with DRM and use what is
    there now

    or

    Persuade the BBC to spend a few hundred million GBP per year on licenses
    that allows them to distribute the programs for free and get every license
    payer to foot the bill.

    Given that there are only a few extra users who are likely to download the
    stuff I don't see how any reasonable person can expect the later.

    If you can come up with a way to avoid the extra cost then please say how.
    As it is I think linux users will try and avoid DRM at any cost so it would
    be pointless doing a linux DRM fix as well as being damn difficult to
    prevent it being cracked after a week.


  9. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent



    "Trevor Best" wrote in message
    newsan.2008.02.16.13.09.44.554572@besty.org.uk...
    > On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:43:03 +0000, Ram wrote:
    >
    >> It is *independent* all the mayor platforms can stream iPlayer and they
    >> been able to from December 07, you just can't download the program.

    >
    > It's only recently for me that BBC can go full screen, in the same way
    > YouTubby does now in FF. Up until a couple of weeks ago I had to boot into
    > Windows or use a virtual machine to see full screen streamed (let alone
    > downloaded) or else watch in tiny window in Linux.


    That was a limitation of the software you were running not the BBC source.
    Personally I don't think the streamed video is good enough for full screen
    but I do use a 26" monitor.




  10. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:58:31 +0000, dennis@home wrote:

    > "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    > news:rEytj.537$ay3.116@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
    >> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay

    >>
    >> Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    >> broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't see
    >> why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get what we
    >> have all paid for.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > So you have two choices.. get a platform that works with DRM and use
    > what is there now
    >
    > or
    >
    > Persuade the BBC to spend a few hundred million GBP per year on licenses
    > that allows them to distribute the programs for free and get every
    > license payer to foot the bill.
    >
    > Given that there are only a few extra users who are likely to download
    > the stuff I don't see how any reasonable person can expect the later.
    >
    > If you can come up with a way to avoid the extra cost then please say
    > how. As it is I think linux users will try and avoid DRM at any cost so
    > it would be pointless doing a linux DRM fix as well as being damn
    > difficult to prevent it being cracked after a week.


    There's another alternative, and it would take no time at all to
    implement:

    If the Beeb can't or won't provide the service we have paid for, then
    they should reduce the licence fee for Linux users accordingly.


  11. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent



    "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    news:QnCtj.943$yv1.664@newsfe4-win.ntli.net...
    > On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:58:31 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >
    >> "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    >> news:rEytj.537$ay3.116@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
    >>> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay
    >>>
    >>> Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    >>> broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't see
    >>> why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get what we
    >>> have all paid for.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> So you have two choices.. get a platform that works with DRM and use
    >> what is there now
    >>
    >> or
    >>
    >> Persuade the BBC to spend a few hundred million GBP per year on licenses
    >> that allows them to distribute the programs for free and get every
    >> license payer to foot the bill.
    >>
    >> Given that there are only a few extra users who are likely to download
    >> the stuff I don't see how any reasonable person can expect the later.
    >>
    >> If you can come up with a way to avoid the extra cost then please say
    >> how. As it is I think linux users will try and avoid DRM at any cost so
    >> it would be pointless doing a linux DRM fix as well as being damn
    >> difficult to prevent it being cracked after a week.

    >
    > There's another alternative, and it would take no time at all to
    > implement:
    >
    > If the Beeb can't or won't provide the service we have paid for, then
    > they should reduce the licence fee for Linux users accordingly.
    >


    So you would accept that they supply the linux service you want and you pay
    the extra it costs?



  12. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 15:26:11 +0000, dennis@home wrote:

    > "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    > news:QnCtj.943$yv1.664@newsfe4-win.ntli.net...
    >> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:58:31 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    >>> news:rEytj.537$ay3.116@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
    >>>> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay
    >>>>
    >>>> Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    >>>> broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't
    >>>> see why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get
    >>>> what we have all paid for.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> So you have two choices.. get a platform that works with DRM and use
    >>> what is there now
    >>>
    >>> or
    >>>
    >>> Persuade the BBC to spend a few hundred million GBP per year on
    >>> licenses that allows them to distribute the programs for free and get
    >>> every license payer to foot the bill.
    >>>
    >>> Given that there are only a few extra users who are likely to download
    >>> the stuff I don't see how any reasonable person can expect the later.
    >>>
    >>> If you can come up with a way to avoid the extra cost then please say
    >>> how. As it is I think linux users will try and avoid DRM at any cost
    >>> so it would be pointless doing a linux DRM fix as well as being damn
    >>> difficult to prevent it being cracked after a week.

    >>
    >> There's another alternative, and it would take no time at all to
    >> implement:
    >>
    >> If the Beeb can't or won't provide the service we have paid for, then
    >> they should reduce the licence fee for Linux users accordingly.
    >>
    >>

    > So you would accept that they supply the linux service you want and you
    > pay the extra it costs?


    No. If they can't supply the service I have paid for, they should reduce
    my licence fee.

    I am entitled to a Linux service by virtue of my licence fee, and the BBC
    Director General agrees.


    I recognise that to many people’s minds making this service available to
    only a proportion of users was not the correct decision, and I accept
    that for some there is nothing I could say to justify this choice.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcintern...r_choices.html

    I therefore look forward to receiving a full BBC iPlayer service on my
    chosen Linux platform in the near future.



  13. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On 2008-02-16, Hadron hit the keyboard and responded to a known
    win-troll:
    > "dennis@home"
    >>

    >
    > Nobody reads Willy Poster's posts - since all he normally does is waffle
    > on about his killfiles. When he's not distorting the truth and telling
    > lies about when Linux was ready for prime time desktop usage. He is
    > possibly the most usless and boring poster *ever* to post to usenet. He
    > makes Harold Stevens seem like Eddie Murphy on crack.


    Do you go now by the name "Nobody? You seem to read many (if
    not all) of his posts that you know that all he writes about
    is his kill-files, which incidentally I haven't seen by him.



    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    This signature is licensed under the GPL and may be
    freely distributed as long as a copy of the GPL is included... :-)


  14. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent



    "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    news:wqGtj.943$Ef1.140@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
    > On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 15:26:11 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >
    >> "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    >> news:QnCtj.943$yv1.664@newsfe4-win.ntli.net...
    >>> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:58:31 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    >>>> news:rEytj.537$ay3.116@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
    >>>>> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:37:32 +0000, dennis@home wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    >>>>> broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and don't
    >>>>> see why only licence payers who use Microsoft software should get
    >>>>> what we have all paid for.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> So you have two choices.. get a platform that works with DRM and use
    >>>> what is there now
    >>>>
    >>>> or
    >>>>
    >>>> Persuade the BBC to spend a few hundred million GBP per year on
    >>>> licenses that allows them to distribute the programs for free and get
    >>>> every license payer to foot the bill.
    >>>>
    >>>> Given that there are only a few extra users who are likely to download
    >>>> the stuff I don't see how any reasonable person can expect the later.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you can come up with a way to avoid the extra cost then please say
    >>>> how. As it is I think linux users will try and avoid DRM at any cost
    >>>> so it would be pointless doing a linux DRM fix as well as being damn
    >>>> difficult to prevent it being cracked after a week.
    >>>
    >>> There's another alternative, and it would take no time at all to
    >>> implement:
    >>>
    >>> If the Beeb can't or won't provide the service we have paid for, then
    >>> they should reduce the licence fee for Linux users accordingly.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> So you would accept that they supply the linux service you want and you
    >> pay the extra it costs?

    >
    > No. If they can't supply the service I have paid for, they should reduce
    > my licence fee.


    So you think they should reduce it for anyone without broadband, a computer,
    etc.
    You can receive the service if you buy a suitable machine like the rest of
    us, what makes you special?
    >
    > I am entitled to a Linux service by virtue of my licence fee, and the BBC
    > Director General agrees.
    >
    >
    > I recognise that to many people’s minds making this service available to
    > only a proportion of users was not the correct decision, and I accept
    > that for some there is nothing I could say to justify this choice.
    >

    >
    > http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcintern...r_choices.html
    >
    > I therefore look forward to receiving a full BBC iPlayer service on my
    > chosen Linux platform in the near future.


    Reading the quote I wouldn't bet on it, nothing says that he thinks it was
    wrong. There are many that think it was the correct decision, mainly those
    that pay the fee and all(?) those that made it in the first place.

    As it is you have a service that 50% of the population don't in that you can
    stream the stuff and others can't, so expect your fee to go up soon as your
    own logic dictates.

    If it does happen I may have to sell my TV and get the BBC to supply one as
    I would be paying my license fee but couldn't get the service!


    Anyway the license fee is for the ability to receive TV, not the BBC
    services so you are not paying in the first place. 8-)






  15. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    In article , firebrand
    wrote:
    > If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    > Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    > youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    > broadband/index.shtml
    >
    > So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    > their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    > regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    > out and give us what we want!!


    Aren't they supposed to try to limit BBC content to UK viewers? That
    link you gave allows viewing that program outside the UK. From what
    I've read, one of the functions of iPlayer is to keep content in the UK.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  16. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent



    "Tim Smith" wrote in message
    news:reply_in_group-0383E6.14143516022008@news.supernews.com...
    > In article , firebrand
    > wrote:
    >> If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    >> Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    >> youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    >> broadband/index.shtml
    >>
    >> So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    >> their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    >> regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    >> out and give us what we want!!

    >
    > Aren't they supposed to try to limit BBC content to UK viewers? That
    > link you gave allows viewing that program outside the UK. From what
    > I've read, one of the functions of iPlayer is to keep content in the UK.


    Different content has different rights depending on who made it and how much
    the BBC is paying. iPlayer is supposed to allow them to control the rights
    so the BBC doesn't exceed its rights and get sued. I assume they have the
    rights to distribute the low res version of Horizon world wide or someone
    has made a ****-up.


  17. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    "dennis@home" writes:

    > "Tim Smith" wrote in message
    > news:reply_in_group-0383E6.14143516022008@news.supernews.com...
    >> In article , firebrand
    >> wrote:
    >>> If you check out the BBC website, you'll see that the science programme
    >>> Horizon can now be viewed online with a flash player, in the style of
    >>> youtube. This is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/
    >>> broadband/index.shtml
    >>>
    >>> So, if the BBC can do this with Horizon, surely they can do it with all
    >>> their shows. Their entire TV output can be made available to everyone,
    >>> regardless of what OS one uses. They ought to pull their bloody finger
    >>> out and give us what we want!!

    >>
    >> Aren't they supposed to try to limit BBC content to UK viewers? That
    >> link you gave allows viewing that program outside the UK. From what
    >> I've read, one of the functions of iPlayer is to keep content in the UK.

    >
    > Different content has different rights depending on who made it and
    > how much the BBC is paying. iPlayer is supposed to allow them to
    > control the rights so the BBC doesn't exceed its rights and get
    > sued. I assume they have the rights to distribute the low res version
    > of Horizon world wide or someone has made a ****-up.
    >


    They should hire Andrew Spike1 to work it all out. He says its not theft
    to download other peoples work without paying them.

    --
    Murphy was an optimist.

  18. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    Dragomir Kollaric wrote:

    > On 2008-02-16, Hadron hit the keyboard and responded to a known
    > win-troll:
    >> "dennis@home"
    >>>

    >>
    >> Nobody reads Willy Poster's posts - since all he normally does is waffle
    >> on about his killfiles. When he's not distorting the truth and telling
    >> lies about when Linux was ready for prime time desktop usage. He is
    >> possibly the most usless and boring poster *ever* to post to usenet. He
    >> makes Harold Stevens seem like Eddie Murphy on crack.

    >
    > Do you go now by the name "Nobody? You seem to read many (if
    > not all) of his posts that you know that all he writes about
    > is his kill-files, which incidentally I haven't seen by him.


    Well Hadron Quack is a "nobody", he's a self-admitted troll:

    Hadron
    Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.advocacy
    Message-ID:
    Date: Tue, 18 Sep 2007
    "Of course I troll sometimes. I never denied it."

    --
    Free-BSD 7.0, PC-BSD 1.4
    Linux systems: PCLOS 2007, Mandrake One 2008,
    Fedora 8, Kubuntu 7.10.
    -- On 64bit systems --

  19. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:58:31 +0000, dennis@home wrote:

    > As it is I think linux users will try and avoid DRM at any cost so it would
    > be pointless doing a linux DRM fix as well as being damn difficult to
    > prevent it being cracked after a week.


    More difficult than in Windows?

    The DVD keys came from XingDVD Player in Windows:
    http://www.cnn.com/TECH/computing/9911/05/dvd.hack.idg/

    The Blu-ray/HD DVD keys came from WinDVD in Windows:
    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070213-8837.html

    The constant struggle to stay ahead of folks releasing serial generators
    happens in Windows.


    What has been cracked in Linux?






    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  20. Re: BBC online viewing *can* be platform-independent

    keith wrote:
    > Robin T Cox wrote:
    >> dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you want free high res downloads someone has to pay

    >>
    >> Nobody is asking for freebies. Those of us who have a current
    >> broadcasting licence consider that we have already paid, and
    >> don't see why only licence payers who use Microsoft software
    >> should get what we have all paid for.

    >
    > It's a bit more limited than that. I wanted to see a Beeb
    > programme, so cranked up my trusty old Win2000 machine, and it
    > refused to allow iPlayer on that. Only XP and Vista machines
    > are catered for. Same goes for the 4OD service. Presumably
    > because the older versions of Windows don't support DRM.


    It's simpler than that. You haven't contributed to the MS profit
    line, as evidenced by the lack of XP and/or Vista. QED.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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