Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system - Ubuntu ; Yesterday I decided to format my PC and reinstall Windows for the first time in a couple of years. I do this every few years to get rid of junk software that we don't use any longer, spyware, and free ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

  1. Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    Yesterday I decided to format my PC and reinstall Windows for the first
    time in a couple of years. I do this every few years to get rid of junk
    software that we don't use any longer, spyware, and free up hard drive
    space. The system always seems to run a lot faster afterwards, even after I
    reinstall the programs I actually use.

    This time around, I decided to start out by installing Ubuntu 7.1. It
    locked up shortly after selecting Detroit as my closest city, so I rebooted
    and tried again. It went without a hitch, although I was a bit confused
    about how to do a swap partition at first.

    I created a 20 GB partition for Ubuntu, and a 1 GB swap partition. I
    rebooted, and everything worked perfectly. Then I installed Windows,
    thinking that on bootup, I would be given the choice of either booting to
    Linux or Windows XP Professional. Instead, I just get Windows.

    I have two hard drives installed, of roughly the same size. I intended to
    use the older one occasionally just to maintain a regular backup of files.

    I hooked the second hard drive up as master on the terminus of the data
    cable, and now my system sees it as the C drive, despite the fact that it
    was set up after installing windows, and booting from that drive. I may
    have to swap the drives and their jumper settings, just to make sure that
    the newer Seagate is the one that boots and has most of the wear and tear.

    My big problem, however, is figuring out how to do this with a working
    dual boot. I'd really like to be able to choose between Ubuntu and Windows,
    and thought that the newer versions of Ubuntu supported this automatically.
    This was why I installed Ubuntu first - I thought it had some sort of
    manager that went on the disk, making this sort of thing easy.

    Anyone have suggestions on something I may have overlooked on getting this
    to work?



  2. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    OhioGuy schreef:
    > Yesterday I decided to format my PC and reinstall Windows for the first
    > time in a couple of years. I do this every few years to get rid of junk
    > software that we don't use any longer, spyware, and free up hard drive
    > space. The system always seems to run a lot faster afterwards, even after I
    > reinstall the programs I actually use.
    >
    > This time around, I decided to start out by installing Ubuntu 7.1. It
    > locked up shortly after selecting Detroit as my closest city, so I rebooted
    > and tried again. It went without a hitch, although I was a bit confused
    > about how to do a swap partition at first.
    >
    > I created a 20 GB partition for Ubuntu, and a 1 GB swap partition. I
    > rebooted, and everything worked perfectly. Then I installed Windows,
    > thinking that on bootup, I would be given the choice of either booting to
    > Linux or Windows XP Professional. Instead, I just get Windows.
    >
    > I have two hard drives installed, of roughly the same size. I intended to
    > use the older one occasionally just to maintain a regular backup of files.
    >
    > I hooked the second hard drive up as master on the terminus of the data
    > cable, and now my system sees it as the C drive, despite the fact that it
    > was set up after installing windows, and booting from that drive. I may
    > have to swap the drives and their jumper settings, just to make sure that
    > the newer Seagate is the one that boots and has most of the wear and tear.
    >
    > My big problem, however, is figuring out how to do this with a working
    > dual boot. I'd really like to be able to choose between Ubuntu and Windows,
    > and thought that the newer versions of Ubuntu supported this automatically.
    > This was why I installed Ubuntu first - I thought it had some sort of
    > manager that went on the disk, making this sort of thing easy.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions on something I may have overlooked on getting this
    > to work?
    >
    >

    You overlooked the self-serving evil corporation that Microsoft is.
    A Microsoft install will by design ignore other OS's and reclaim the
    boot sector.

    But there is a good rescue, just google for the "super grub" disk.

  3. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 14:14:03 -0500, OhioGuy wrote:

    > Yesterday I decided to format my PC and reinstall Windows for the first
    > time in a couple of years. I do this every few years to get rid of junk
    > software that we don't use any longer, spyware, and free up hard drive
    > space. The system always seems to run a lot faster afterwards, even after I
    > reinstall the programs I actually use.
    >
    > This time around, I decided to start out by installing Ubuntu 7.1. It
    > locked up shortly after selecting Detroit as my closest city, so I rebooted
    > and tried again. It went without a hitch, although I was a bit confused
    > about how to do a swap partition at first.


    There is not Ubuntu 7.1. Assuming you are new to Ubuntu, the naming
    convention has the year to the left of the decimal and the month of issue
    to the right. 7.1 would be confused with 7.01 - either could mean January.
    Since 7.10 was issued in October, it is properly referenced as 7.10.

    >
    > I created a 20 GB partition for Ubuntu, and a 1 GB swap partition. I
    > rebooted, and everything worked perfectly. Then I installed Windows,
    > thinking that on bootup, I would be given the choice of either booting to
    > Linux or Windows XP Professional. Instead, I just get Windows.


    That is correct. MS systems always overwrite the Master Boot Record,
    assuming they are the only thing in existence. That is why folks generally
    install MS first and then let the Linux install set up the dual boot
    automagically.

    >
    > I have two hard drives installed, of roughly the same size. I intended to
    > use the older one occasionally just to maintain a regular backup of files.
    >
    > I hooked the second hard drive up as master on the terminus of the data
    > cable, and now my system sees it as the C drive, despite the fact that it
    > was set up after installing windows, and booting from that drive. I may
    > have to swap the drives and their jumper settings, just to make sure that
    > the newer Seagate is the one that boots and has most of the wear and tear.
    >
    > My big problem, however, is figuring out how to do this with a working
    > dual boot. I'd really like to be able to choose between Ubuntu and Windows,
    > and thought that the newer versions of Ubuntu supported this automatically.
    > This was why I installed Ubuntu first - I thought it had some sort of
    > manager that went on the disk, making this sort of thing easy.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions on something I may have overlooked on getting this
    > to work?


    As mentioned, if you has installed MS first and then Ubuntu, it would have
    set up the dual boot for you automagically. Here is one way to set things
    up:

    boot up a Live CD - the Ubuntu CD will probably suffice for this as long
    as you have the 'regular' Live CD/install disk. Then start a terminal
    window from the accessories menu. Then start grub with 'sudo grub'. Then,
    assuming your Ubuntu distro is installed on /dev/hda3, for example:

    grub> root (hd0,2) note grub is zero based
    grub> setup (hd0) this rewrites the MBR
    grub> quit

    Then reboot and you will have your original Ubuntu menu - without MS as an
    option. The next step will be to boot into your Ubuntu installation and
    edit the /boot/grub/menu.lst file to include a stanza for the MS install.
    Then you are done.


  4. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 14:14:03 -0500, OhioGuy wrote:

    > Anyone have suggestions on something I may have overlooked on getting
    > this to work?


    You have to install Windows first, and then Ubuntu, or else Windows will
    wipe anything else from your Master Boot Record and not let you install
    it.


  5. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    On 2008-01-03, OhioGuy hit the keyboard and wrote:

    > Yesterday I decided to format my PC and reinstall
    > Windows for the first time in a couple of years. I do this
    > every few years to get rid of junk software that we don't
    > use any longer, spyware, and free up hard drive space. The
    > system always seems to run a lot faster afterwards, even
    > after I reinstall the programs I actually use.
    >
    > This time around, I decided to start out by installing
    > Ubuntu 7.1. It locked up shortly after selecting Detroit
    > as my closest city, so I rebooted and tried again. It went
    > without a hitch, although I was a bit confused about how
    > to do a swap partition at first.
    >
    > I created a 20 GB partition for Ubuntu, and a 1 GB swap
    > partition. I rebooted, and everything worked perfectly.
    > Then I installed Windows, thinking that on bootup, I would
    > be given the choice of either booting to Linux or Windows
    > XP Professional. Instead, I just get Windows.


    Sorry Windows doesn't like it being installed *after*
    another OS is on the HD.

    Do you have both OS's on different drives?

    >
    > I have two hard drives installed, of roughly the same
    > size. I intended to use the older one occasionally just to
    > maintain a regular backup of files.
    >
    > I hooked the second hard drive up as master on the
    > terminus of the data cable, and now my system sees it as
    > the C drive, despite the fact that it was set up after
    > installing windows, and booting from that drive. I may
    > have to swap the drives and their jumper settings, just to
    > make sure that the newer Seagate is the one that boots and
    > has most of the wear and tear.
    >
    > My big problem, however, is figuring out how to do this
    > with a working dual boot. I'd really like to be able to
    > choose between Ubuntu and Windows, and thought that the
    > newer versions of Ubuntu supported this automatically.
    > This was why I installed Ubuntu first - I thought it had
    > some sort of manager that went on the disk, making this
    > sort of thing easy.


    Yes it does, but "Windows" does not like being installed after
    another OS is set up, it will overwrite the MBR.

    Did you install Ubuntu then a second time?

    OK basically you would need first a "rescue-cd" and or
    grub-boot disk. If you installed Ubuntu using a Live CD-Rom
    you can also use this as well.

    if you have on each drive just one (or the most two)
    partitions, then it would not make much problems swapping
    the HDD.

    Steps to take would be: editing these files:
    /etc/fstab
    /boot/grub/menu.lst
    then running "grub" to install it again.

    Can you boot right now into "Ubuntu"?
    If not what are the error messages you`re getting if any?

    Think this needs to be done step by step...

    >
    > Anyone have suggestions on something I may have
    > overlooked on getting this to work?
    >
    >



    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    Problem: "Autopilot in altitude hold mode
    produces a 200 fpm descent."
    Solution: "Cannot reproduce problem on ground."

  6. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    On 2008-01-03, ray hit the keyboard and wrote:




    >
    > grub> root (hd0,2) note grub is zero based
    > grub> setup (hd0) this rewrites the MBR
    > grub> quit
    >


    > Then reboot and you will have your original Ubuntu menu
    > - without MS as an option. The next step will be
    > to boot into your Ubuntu installation and edit the
    > /boot/grub/menu.lst file to include a stanza for the MS
    > install. Then you are done.


    @ OP If you look "carefully" through /boot/grub/menu.lst you will
    find a "stanza" for "windows". "Copy" it and uncomment it.
    Also I think that the /boot/grub/menu.lst will still be there with
    the correct settings. Unless you changed the drives. But getting the
    drives to work should not be such a headache ...

    HTH
    >



    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    Problem: "Autopilot in altitude hold mode
    produces a 200 fpm descent."
    Solution: "Cannot reproduce problem on ground."

  7. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 14:14:03 -0500, OhioGuy wrote:

    > Yesterday I decided to format my PC and reinstall Windows for the first
    > time in a couple of years. I do this every few years to get rid of junk
    > software that we don't use any longer, spyware, and free up hard drive
    > space. The system always seems to run a lot faster afterwards, even after I
    > reinstall the programs I actually use.
    >
    > This time around, I decided to start out by installing Ubuntu 7.1. It
    > locked up shortly after selecting Detroit as my closest city, so I rebooted
    > and tried again. It went without a hitch, although I was a bit confused
    > about how to do a swap partition at first.
    >
    > I created a 20 GB partition for Ubuntu, and a 1 GB swap partition. I
    > rebooted, and everything worked perfectly. Then I installed Windows,
    > thinking that on bootup, I would be given the choice of either booting to
    > Linux or Windows XP Professional. Instead, I just get Windows.
    >
    > I have two hard drives installed, of roughly the same size. I intended to
    > use the older one occasionally just to maintain a regular backup of files.
    >
    > I hooked the second hard drive up as master on the terminus of the data
    > cable, and now my system sees it as the C drive, despite the fact that it
    > was set up after installing windows, and booting from that drive. I may
    > have to swap the drives and their jumper settings, just to make sure that
    > the newer Seagate is the one that boots and has most of the wear and tear.
    >
    > My big problem, however, is figuring out how to do this with a working
    > dual boot. I'd really like to be able to choose between Ubuntu and Windows,
    > and thought that the newer versions of Ubuntu supported this automatically.
    > This was why I installed Ubuntu first - I thought it had some sort of
    > manager that went on the disk, making this sort of thing easy.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions on something I may have overlooked on getting this
    > to work?


    You have overlooked the most basic rule of desktop computing: Windows
    does not feel obligated to cooperate with any other software system.
    Whatever Ubuntu set up as a dual boot controller was overwritten by
    Windows, which expects to have complete use of all resources. You have to
    install Windows first, THEN install Ubuntu.

    --
    MarkA
    (This space accidentally filled in)


  8. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    Thanks, everbody. I don't feel comfortable doing the editing that you
    guys are mentioning - and don't even know what to use to do it, either.

    Since I haven't installed anything on Windows yet, and don't really have
    any time invested in it, I'm going to just swap the disks on their places on
    the data cable (remembering to also switch the jumper settings). This
    should then ensure that the newer drive gets the most wear and tear as the
    boot disk, and the older one will mostly be used for archiving.

    If I did go ahead and install Ubuntu on a completely separate drive, the
    BIOS would make it a simple thing to change what drive I'm booting from. It
    defaults to whatever I was booting the last time, but a couple of keys will
    change that whenever I want.

    Would it be a lot simpler for me to do a dual boot system with Windows on
    one disk, and Ubuntu on the other?

    The thing is, if I put Ubuntu on the second disk, I would still want to be
    able to archive mpeg 4 files and documents onto it. Can you do this?

    In other words, if HDD A had Windows installed, and HDD B had Ubuntu
    installed, can a person copy folders back and forth between them?

    If so, this solution might work out better. I could just boot up from
    Windows most of the time, and then occasionally boot up to Ubuntu on the
    second drive, as I learn more about it.



  9. Re: Please help - first try setting up a dual boot system

    OhioGuy wrote:

    > Thanks, everbody. I don't feel comfortable doing the editing that you
    > guys are mentioning - and don't even know what to use to do it, either.
    >
    > Since I haven't installed anything on Windows yet, and don't really have
    > any time invested in it, I'm going to just swap the disks on their places
    > on
    > the data cable (remembering to also switch the jumper settings). This
    > should then ensure that the newer drive gets the most wear and tear as the
    > boot disk, and the older one will mostly be used for archiving.
    >
    > If I did go ahead and install Ubuntu on a completely separate drive, the
    > BIOS would make it a simple thing to change what drive I'm booting from.
    > It defaults to whatever I was booting the last time, but a couple of keys
    > will change that whenever I want.
    >

    Don't overcomplicate things. You say you have Windoze installed and running
    on one hard drive? Just go and install Ubuntu on the other hard drive and
    let it handle the dual boot - which it will by putting a new MBR on your
    first hard drive that will allow dualbooting without screwing around with
    boot orders in the BIOS.

    > Would it be a lot simpler for me to do a dual boot system with Windows
    > on
    > one disk, and Ubuntu on the other?
    >

    You can do this if you want. Simpler? It can't be simpler if you just let
    Ubuntu do its thing in terms of setting up Grub and dualboot.

    > The thing is, if I put Ubuntu on the second disk, I would still want to
    > be
    > able to archive mpeg 4 files and documents onto it. Can you do this?
    >

    From Ubuntu, you'll be able to "see" your Windoze disk and copy files from
    it.

    > In other words, if HDD A had Windows installed, and HDD B had Ubuntu
    > installed, can a person copy folders back and forth between them?
    >

    Yes.

    > If so, this solution might work out better. I could just boot up from
    > Windows most of the time, and then occasionally boot up to Ubuntu on the
    > second drive, as I learn more about it.


    Put a little effort into familiarizing yourself with Ubuntu. You'll find in
    short time that Windoze won't be used that often, as you move on to a far
    more superior operating system. :-)

    Best of luck. Easy as pie, if you don't try and lose yourself in all the
    trivial details.

    Cheers.


    --
    Boot It Up!
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=-kql8cWqiv8


+ Reply to Thread