Updating FireFox - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Updating FireFox - Ubuntu ; John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing: > Moog wrote: >> John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing: >>> Debian certainly is no toy. I probably will start a humongous thread by >>> saying this, but I consider Debian the ...

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Thread: Updating FireFox

  1. Re: Updating FireFox

    John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > Moog wrote:
    >> John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>> Debian certainly is no toy. I probably will start a humongous thread by
    >>> saying this, but I consider Debian the best GNU/Linux distro. I have
    >>> Etch running on three boxes, and Sarge on ten.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I did try it some while back (as a few in here know) and found my
    >> knowledge at the time wasn't sufficient to get X started. Hence my
    >> life in Ubuntu. This distro actually got me through some of the
    >> hurdles I couldn't get over as a "advanced computer using newb".
    >>

    >
    >
    > Of course you realize that Debian now installs GNOME as the default, and
    > does the startx as a default.


    I do. I should also have stated that I do have a rarely used VM of
    Debian 4 and whilst I like the look of it, I still prefer Ubuntu.

    > Perhaps you had too little RAM or video RAM?


    Quite possibly. Like I said, I was a newb. Although, I would think it
    was xorg related rather than RAM seeing as Ubuntu installed OK on it.

    > I fired up the old Slackware 10 box last evening to reply to a Slackware
    > thread in this group. I had no idea what, if any, news client I might
    > have installed.
    >
    > Slackware booted up fine, and pretty fast on the old 133 MHz Cyrix
    > 6x86-P166+GP, but when I entered "startx" it slowly loaded KDE. So slow
    > that the HDD LED never went off, possibly due to spooling (the RAM)
    > in/out of SWAP. I finally gave up trying to use KDE, and gave the box a
    > shutdown command from another TTY terminal. It has only 48 MB of RAM,
    > and a small 3.2 GB HDD.
    >
    > Something for a snowy night, when I run out of other projects.


    Heh. I'd have to be completely snowed in with nothing left in the
    alcohol cabinet to even be bothered switching that sort of system on.
    My beloved Amiga rarely gets a dust off these days.

    >>> I have Fedora Core 1,3, 4 and 5, as well as Red Hat 5.2. Don't really
    >>> care for their RPM idea. Same thoughts for the Mandrake 8 and 10 that I
    >>> seldom use.


    I thought Mandrake was superb and fell apart when it nipped into
    *driva. I do like the look of Metisse though (well in the things I've
    read, I've not yet tried to install)
    http://flickr.com/photos/mandriva/36...7594271988435/

    >> RPM's are fine. It's just when you see what else is out there that you
    >> start to wonder about yast and the like. The amount of dependency hell
    >> errors i've seen is eye watering.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I had some encounters with Dependency Hell when using Fedora Core 1, but
    > have not had any problems with the newer releases.


    Maybe it was just a case of me tinkering too much? Who can tell.

    >
    > Personally, I believe all of the spammers and crackers should be lined
    > up and shot. Is that politically-correct?


    Politically correct. Maybe not. But I completely agree. They're just a
    bunch of horrbile little weasels with little or no originality. If
    they could employ their effort into something worthwhile instead,
    they'd be better of and society would improve exponentially.

    >>> Now Solaris.... I tried to install it, and the install actually went
    >>> fine. Except it couldn't find my NIC. So what good is a non-networked
    >>> Unix box except for maybe a game box (and not many games for Unix I
    >>> bet)? This was Solaris 10.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Sorry. I should have stated OpenSolaris. I actually got the Open
    >> Solaris Starter Kit Free DVD which, although taking a while to arrive,
    >> is very good.
    >> http://www.opensolaris.org/os/

    >
    > Maybe this is what I have? It was an offer about a year ago. Believe it
    > was called their "Media Kit"? It was free and took a couple of months to
    > arrive, getting here on March 3, 2007.
    >
    > Let's see....
    >
    > The DVD "jewelbox" cover says, "Solaris 10 Operating System 11/06."
    >
    > There are three DVDs.
    >
    > 1. 11/06 Solaris 10 Operating System -- x64/x86
    > 2. 11/06 Solaris 10 Operating System -- SPARC
    > 3. Developer Tools


    Sounds Similar, but not exactly the same. Mine explicitly states
    OpenSolaris on all. Maybe your DVD was prior to the new "rebadge"?

    > The last one contains:
    >
    > Sun Studio 11
    > Sun Java Studio Creator 2 Update 1
    > Sun Java Studio Enterprise 8
    > NetBeans 5.0
    >
    >
    >>> Did you have any trouble with it identifying your NIC?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Nope. It picked it up straightaway on one of the installation routines
    >> on the DVD I was sent. Realtek NIC here BTW.

    >
    >
    > The computer I used (AMD Duron 1600) has a motherboard NIC. It is one of
    > only two that I have with DVD drives. The other one (AMD Athlon 1200)
    > has the Win XP Pro on a 160 GB HDD (C: 40 GB and D: 40 GB), and Ubuntu
    > 6.06 on an 80 GB HDD. I guess I could use the 80 GB drive, since I have
    > Ubuntu 6.06 on this PC (AMD Duron 1800), which I use most of the time.
    >
    > Let me fire it up (Debian 4.0r1) and take a look to see what it is....
    >
    > <...>


    > Ah-ha! It has a D-Link System Inc RTL8139 Ethernet (rev 10) on the
    > motherboard. Since your Realtek worked, so should this one.


    Quite. It looks promising.

    > I can do without this Ubuntu install, but maybe I'll save it, and
    > repartition that 80 GB HDD, then install Solaris in the new partition. I
    > have plenty of disk space (41 GB):


    You've got plenty. I've got my Solaris limited to 20gb.

    > <...>
    > Did your Solaris install provide any GRUB or LILO? Seems like when I
    > installed it, it didn't, but it was the first install on the new 250 GB
    > HDD. I would think Sun believes Solaris is big and bad enough to not
    > ever need another OS on the same computer.


    To be perfectly honest John, I think I needed to use Supergrub to
    configure a properly working Grub. I recall having issues, but it was
    a while back, and I didn't make any notes.

    > I'd certainly like to look it over, having tired from the BSDs. I set it
    > aside last spring, guessing available software is limited, unless I want
    > to search for something and compile.


    To be honest, it is very close to what you see in most *nixes. There's
    a lot to see out in the *nix world, and it's all just a matter of "do
    you have enough time"?

    > My plans were also wrecked when I had a minor heart attack on May 7th.
    > When I told my VA hospital doctor on a regular semi-annual visit on May
    > 17, she immediately admitted me to the cardiologist people, who
    > performed an angiogram that afternoon. They found a 90% and a 65%
    > blockage, and the next morning they inserted two stents.


    Ouch. Things are OK now I hope.

    > The remainder of May and part of June, I had a severe allergic reaction
    > to one of the many pills they give me. I woke up itching like crazy, and
    > nearly tore off my skin. I resembled a lobster from all of the
    > scratching. I suspect it was the Plavix, since it was removed for a week
    > and then restarted in July, causing some itching.


    Well mate, at least you didn't start being chased by pixies. ;-)

    > The July removal was because I had an appendectomy on July 6. I actually
    > spent eight hours on July 5th in the VA Emergency Room, but they
    > couldn't say I had appendicitis from the xrays and C-T scan. So I went
    > home to drink a bottle of Mag Citrate, but returned at 0500 the
    > following morning in more pain. By 1030 I was out, and they removed the
    > appendix, plus cleaned out the poison that had burst more than 28 hours
    > before.


    My mopther suffered similar. You were quite possibly minutes away from
    death if your appendix burst. It was a bloody good job you decided to
    act when you did.

    > I remained in the hospital for a week. The surgeon removed some sutures
    > the following Friday evening. I started leaking fluid from the 10 cm
    > wound on my belly, so I was taken back to the OR on Saturday and knocked
    > out again, while they resewed me. Then it was another week while I
    > recovered, for a total of 14 days as an inpatient.
    >
    > When I got back home, there were around 2800 articles to read in this
    > newsgroup!


    There's a silver lining to every cloud. ;-)

    > A month later he removed the three large sutures that were irritating my
    > skin, and I started feeling much better. The whole month before I
    > couldn't hardly sit, or if I did, I had pain getting up.
    >
    > He also informed me that the appendix biopsy had cancer on it. However,
    > no chemo or radiation is believed to be needed since the cancer was less
    > than 1 cm, and it was removed. Who knows? I could be hit by a Mack truck
    > next week. ;-)
    >
    > So, after the most intense summer in my 62 years, I have somehow
    > misplaced my roundtuit. I'll find it, so stay tuned for more soap opera.


    Excellent stuff John. Good health mate.

    --
    Moog

    "Some mornings it just doesn't seem worth it to gnaw through the
    leather straps."

  2. Re: Updating FireFox

    On Tue, 02 Oct 2007 21:51:05 +0000, John F. Morse wrote:

    > Of course you realize that Debian now installs GNOME as the default,


    True, but please note there are also KDE and XFCE versions of CD#1.

    > and does the startx as a default.


    To be precise, it starts gdm by default (I assume it starts kdm on the
    KDE install) if you install the desktop environment.

    > Slackware booted up fine, and pretty fast on the old 133 MHz Cyrix
    > 6x86-P166+GP, but when I entered "startx" it slowly loaded KDE.


    LOL! If you type "start" and hit TAB, do you get "startfluxbox" as an
    option? Because that has a better chance of getting to a desktop before
    the universe suffers heat death :-)

  3. Re: Updating FireFox

    Mark South wrote:
    > On Tue, 02 Oct 2007 21:51:05 +0000, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Of course you realize that Debian now installs GNOME as the default,
    >>

    >
    > True, but please note there are also KDE and XFCE versions of CD#1.
    >



    I use the netinst CD. I don't download the whole 21 CD set!

    I don't know if KDE is on the netinst CD, but it certainly is available
    from the repository. I installed KDE on one Debian 3.1 system a few
    years ago, but it now has Debian 4.0 and GNOME.


    >> and does the startx as a default.
    >>

    >
    > To be precise, it starts gdm by default (I assume it starts kdm on the
    > KDE install) if you install the desktop environment.
    >



    No, startx starts KDE (kdm). ;-)

    My Slackware 10 system does not have GNOME (gdm) installed.


    >> Slackware booted up fine, and pretty fast on the old 133 MHz Cyrix
    >> 6x86-P166+GP, but when I entered "startx" it slowly loaded KDE.
    >>

    >
    > LOL! If you type "start" and hit TAB, do you get "startfluxbox" as an
    > option? Because that has a better chance of getting to a desktop before
    > the universe suffers heat death :-)
    >



    That is not an "option." That is the BASH completion. ;-)

    startfluxbox is available, (see the ssh session below) but it responds
    that X must first be started. If I startx, then KDE (kdm) starts ...
    eventually.

    I also have the startxfce4 command which brings up xfce and its mouse.
    It doesn't require startx, and it also is slow. I haven't given it any
    workout though, but will later today while I'm doing other things in the
    basement. It resembles the Mac dock.

    Here is an ssh session with a few details on this speed daemon PC
    (hostnames munged to better indicate what box is what):

    john@ubuntu606:~$ ssh slackware10.0
    john@slackware10.0 password:
    Last login: Wed Oct 3 14:32:13 2007
    Linux 2.4.29.

    Have you ever noticed that the people who are always trying to tell
    you, "There's a time for work and a time for play," never find the time
    for play?

    john@slackware10.0:~$ start
    startfluxbox startkde startx startxfce4
    john@slackware10.0:~$ start
    john@slackware10.0:~$ df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/hda1 3.0G 2.6G 441M 86% /
    john@slackware10.0:~$ free
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 45472 44428 1044 0 216 2388
    -/+ buffers/cache: 41824 3648
    Swap: 0 0 0
    john@slackware10.0:~$ uname -a
    Linux slackware10.0 2.4.29 #6 Thu Jan 20 16:30:37 PST 2005 i586 unknown
    unknown GNU/Linux
    john@slackware10.0:~$ sudo lsb_release -a
    Password:
    sudo: lsb_release: command not found
    john@slackware10.0:~$ top

    top - 15:38:22 up 1:09, 2 users, load average: 0.57, 2.24, 2.51
    Tasks: 62 total, 1 running, 61 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie
    Cpu(s): 2.9% user, 5.1% system, 0.0% nice, 92.0% idle
    Mem: 45472k total, 44500k used, 972k free, 212k buffers
    Swap: 0k total, 0k used, 0k free, 2728k cached

    PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND
    4 root 14 0 0 0 0 S 3.2 0.0 1:43.65 kswapd
    821 john 19 0 628 628 400 R 2.9 1.4 0:01.76 top
    522 john 11 0 4156 4152 2516 S 1.0 9.1 0:38.36 kdeinit
    [q]
    [^d]
    john@slackware10.0:~$ logout
    Connection to slackware10.0 closed.
    john@ubuntu606:~$

    It certainly looks like the RAM is fine. None of the Swap is used. I
    guess the slowness and continuous HDD activity is due to the Cyrix 133,
    but the CPU load is very light. It is much snappier without X running.

    This box, and the Slackware on it, are both in the class of "toy" right
    now, for use when I run out of other things more pressing. ;-)

    It took this PC over three days to do one SETI@Home Classic work unit.
    Certainly didn't help my average speed, and ET wasn't found either.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  4. Re: Updating FireFox

    Moog wrote:
    > John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >> Of course you realize that Debian now installs GNOME as the default, and
    >> does the startx as a default.
    >>

    >
    > I do. I should also have stated that I do have a rarely used VM of
    > Debian 4 and whilst I like the look of it, I still prefer Ubuntu.



    I'm gonna have to try out one of those VMs for experimental purposes
    with OS installs. I have the qemu, with Win 98SE installed just as a
    test OS, but I don't know if it would be as good as those other two that
    you use(d).


    >> I fired up the old Slackware 10 box last evening to reply to a Slackware
    >> thread in this group. I had no idea what, if any, news client I might
    >> have installed.
    >>
    >> Slackware booted up fine, and pretty fast on the old 133 MHz Cyrix
    >> 6x86-P166+GP, but when I entered "startx" it slowly loaded KDE. So slow
    >> that the HDD LED never went off, possibly due to spooling (the RAM)
    >> in/out of SWAP. I finally gave up trying to use KDE, and gave the box a
    >> shutdown command from another TTY terminal. It has only 48 MB of RAM,
    >> and a small 3.2 GB HDD.
    >>
    >> Something for a snowy night, when I run out of other projects.
    >>

    >
    > Heh. I'd have to be completely snowed in with nothing left in the
    > alcohol cabinet to even be bothered switching that sort of system on.
    > My beloved Amiga rarely gets a dust off these days.
    >



    Fire it up when you pop the cork. Then when you wake up and get rid of
    the hangover, it will be ready. ;-)


    >> I can do without this Ubuntu install, but maybe I'll save it, and
    >> repartition that 80 GB HDD, then install Solaris in the new partition. I
    >> have plenty of disk space (41 GB):
    >>

    >
    > You've got plenty. I've got my Solaris limited to 20gb.
    >



    I gave it only 10 GB when I installed it. It had plenty of room, and did
    run OK, ... except no network.


    >> <...>
    >> Did your Solaris install provide any GRUB or LILO? Seems like when I
    >> installed it, it didn't, but it was the first install on the new 250 GB
    >> HDD. I would think Sun believes Solaris is big and bad enough to not
    >> ever need another OS on the same computer.
    >>

    >
    > To be perfectly honest John, I think I needed to use Supergrub to
    > configure a properly working Grub. I recall having issues, but it was
    > a while back, and I didn't make any notes.
    >



    So Supergrub can detect Solaris as an OS?


    >> I'd certainly like to look it over, having tired from the BSDs. I set it
    >> aside last spring, guessing available software is limited, unless I want
    >> to search for something and compile.
    >>

    >
    > To be honest, it is very close to what you see in most *nixes. There's
    > a lot to see out in the *nix world, and it's all just a matter of "do
    > you have enough time"?
    >



    There is certainly a lot more than the DEB ~20,000 packages.

    But time?
    >
    >> My plans were also wrecked when I had a minor heart attack on May 7th.
    >> When I told my VA hospital doctor on a regular semi-annual visit on May
    >> 17, she immediately admitted me to the cardiologist people, who
    >> performed an angiogram that afternoon. They found a 90% and a 65%
    >> blockage, and the next morning they inserted two stents.
    >>

    >
    > Ouch. Things are OK now I hope.
    >



    As far as I know. I pop the Zocor and go to the BBQ and Chinese restaurants.


    > My mopther suffered similar. You were quite possibly minutes away from
    > death if your appendix burst. It was a bloody good job you decided to
    > act when you did.
    >



    It has burst at least some 28 hours before I was in surgery. This was
    determined by no swelling in the xrays and C-T scan, indicating it had
    already dumped in me. The doctor told me that had it happened 20 years
    ago, I wouldn't have lived.


    > Excellent stuff John. Good health mate.



    Thank you, kind sir. I'll certainly try to do my part. No cigarettes. No
    alcohol. No cussin'. But plenty of Frank's Hot Sauce, Tabasco,
    horseradish, hot tea, ...! ;-)


    --
    John

    No Microsoft products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  5. Re: Updating FireFox

    On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 21:22:41 GMT, John F. Morse wrote:

    > No, startx starts KDE (kdm). ;-)
    >
    > My Slackware 10 system does not have GNOME (gdm) installed.


    I think you'll find gdm is the 'greeter' that handles account log-in
    and starts the selected window manager/ desktop.

    --
    Chris Game

    "If you ever find yourself on the side of the majority,
    it is time to pause, and reflect." -- Mark Twain

  6. Re: Updating FireFox

    Chris Game wrote:
    > On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 21:22:41 GMT, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >> No, startx starts KDE (kdm). ;-)
    >>
    >> My Slackware 10 system does not have GNOME (gdm) installed.
    >>

    >
    > I think you'll find gdm is the 'greeter' that handles account log-in
    > and starts the selected window manager/ desktop.



    Nope (see: man gdm). The "gdm" stands for GNOME Display Manager. (BTW,
    GNOME is not Gnome.) ;-)

    The "greeter" is part of the previously- (or already-) selected session
    display manager (kdm, gdm, xdm, etc.).

    Like I stated, "My Slackware 10 system does not have GNOME (gdm)
    installed." So, I'll never "find" it on that system ;-)

    My Slack system has the bloated KDE (with the kdm) installed. As well as
    the other two slim and trim "mini-DMs" I mentioned.

    If the man pages aren't clear, or if you are really interested in
    knowing more about display managers, here are a few Wiki entries:

    GDM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOME_Display_Manager
    (Be sure to try the Easter Eggs here.)

    KDM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KDE_Display_Manager

    XDM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xdm

    IceWM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icewm

    XFCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xfce

    And a good comparison:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compari...p_environments

    In depth X11: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_Window_System


    --
    John

    No Microsoft products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  7. Re: Updating FireFox

    On Fri, 05 Oct 2007 00:57:18 GMT, John F. Morse wrote:

    >> I think you'll find gdm is the 'greeter' that handles account log-in
    >> and starts the selected window manager/ desktop.

    >
    > Nope (see: man gdm). The "gdm" stands for GNOME Display Manager. (BTW,
    > GNOME is not Gnome.) ;-)


    "The Gnome Display Manager is a reimplementation of the well known
    xdm program. GDM consists of a daemon and a graphical login
    application which runs as an unpriviledged user. The login GUI
    features a face browser, an optional logo, and language/session type
    selection support. The daemon includes an XDMCP implementation for
    managing remote displays."

    That was more or less my understanding. I don't get too hung up on
    names.

    --
    Chris Game

    "Deleted code has fewer bugs." -- Xibo

  8. Re: Updating FireFox

    Chris Game wrote:
    > On Fri, 05 Oct 2007 00:57:18 GMT, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> I think you'll find gdm is the 'greeter' that handles account log-in
    >>> and starts the selected window manager/ desktop.
    >>>

    >> Nope (see: man gdm). The "gdm" stands for GNOME Display Manager. (BTW,
    >> GNOME is not Gnome.) ;-)
    >>

    >
    > "The Gnome Display Manager is a reimplementation of the well known
    > xdm program. GDM consists of a daemon and a graphical login
    > application which runs as an unpriviledged user. The login GUI
    > features a face browser, an optional logo, and language/session type
    > selection support. The daemon includes an XDMCP implementation for
    > managing remote displays."
    >
    > That was more or less my understanding. I don't get too hung up on
    > names.



    You are partially correct, Chris. It isn't the "name" that was the
    problem though. It is your earlier statement that "gdm ... starts the
    selected window manager / desktop."

    Although the greeter is where logins occur, it is part of an
    already-running display manager -- gdm in this example.

    Your description sounded to me like gdm had to be running in order to
    start the display manager.

    However, you did say "window manager," and in this case, with gdm
    running, it would be metacity.

    I misread your description, having "display manager" on my mind, and
    just plain goofed. Happens several times every day. Ask my Mrs. ;-)

    With all of the complex possibilities in DEs, DMs and WMs, it is a
    wonder I haven't pulled out what little hair I still have.

    Your original description is correct. Sorry for my error.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  9. Re: Updating FireFox

    John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    > Moog wrote:
    >> John F. Morse illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>> Of course you realize that Debian now installs GNOME as the default, and
    >>> does the startx as a default.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I do. I should also have stated that I do have a rarely used VM of
    >> Debian 4 and whilst I like the look of it, I still prefer Ubuntu.

    >
    >
    > I'm gonna have to try out one of those VMs for experimental purposes
    > with OS installs. I have the qemu, with Win 98SE installed just as a
    > test OS, but I don't know if it would be as good as those other two that
    > you use(d).


    Qemu is great. However other vm apps have their own sets of killer
    features. Different strokes and all that.

    >>> I fired up the old Slackware 10 box last evening to reply to a Slackware
    >>> thread in this group. I had no idea what, if any, news client I might
    >>> have installed.
    >>>
    >>> Slackware booted up fine, and pretty fast on the old 133 MHz Cyrix
    >>> 6x86-P166+GP, but when I entered "startx" it slowly loaded KDE. So slow
    >>> that the HDD LED never went off, possibly due to spooling (the RAM)
    >>> in/out of SWAP. I finally gave up trying to use KDE, and gave the box a
    >>> shutdown command from another TTY terminal. It has only 48 MB of RAM,
    >>> and a small 3.2 GB HDD.
    >>>
    >>> Something for a snowy night, when I run out of other projects.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Heh. I'd have to be completely snowed in with nothing left in the
    >> alcohol cabinet to even be bothered switching that sort of system on.
    >> My beloved Amiga rarely gets a dust off these days.

    >
    > Fire it up when you pop the cork. Then when you wake up and get rid of
    > the hangover, it will be ready. ;-)


    LOL.

    >>> I can do without this Ubuntu install, but maybe I'll save it, and
    >>> repartition that 80 GB HDD, then install Solaris in the new partition. I
    >>> have plenty of disk space (41 GB):
    >>>

    >>
    >> You've got plenty. I've got my Solaris limited to 20gb.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I gave it only 10 GB when I installed it. It had plenty of room, and did
    > run OK, ... except no network.
    >
    >>> <...>
    >>> Did your Solaris install provide any GRUB or LILO? Seems like when I
    >>> installed it, it didn't, but it was the first install on the new 250 GB
    >>> HDD. I would think Sun believes Solaris is big and bad enough to not
    >>> ever need another OS on the same computer.
    >>>

    >>
    >> To be perfectly honest John, I think I needed to use Supergrub to
    >> configure a properly working Grub. I recall having issues, but it was
    >> a while back, and I didn't make any notes.
    >>

    >
    >
    > So Supergrub can detect Solaris as an OS?


    Yup. I think it does. Although I am doing this from memory as I didn't
    take any notes.

    >>> I'd certainly like to look it over, having tired from the BSDs. I set it
    >>> aside last spring, guessing available software is limited, unless I want
    >>> to search for something and compile.
    >>>

    >>
    >> To be honest, it is very close to what you see in most *nixes. There's
    >> a lot to see out in the *nix world, and it's all just a matter of "do
    >> you have enough time"?
    >>

    >
    >
    > There is certainly a lot more than the DEB ~20,000 packages.


    Heh.

    > But time?


    Aye. There's never enough of the stuff.

    >>> My plans were also wrecked when I had a minor heart attack on May 7th.
    >>> When I told my VA hospital doctor on a regular semi-annual visit on May
    >>> 17, she immediately admitted me to the cardiologist people, who
    >>> performed an angiogram that afternoon. They found a 90% and a 65%
    >>> blockage, and the next morning they inserted two stents.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Ouch. Things are OK now I hope.
    >>

    >
    >
    > As far as I know. I pop the Zocor and go to the BBQ and Chinese restaurants.
    >
    >
    >> My mopther suffered similar. You were quite possibly minutes away from
    >> death if your appendix burst. It was a bloody good job you decided to
    >> act when you did.
    >>

    >
    >
    > It has burst at least some 28 hours before I was in surgery. This was
    > determined by no swelling in the xrays and C-T scan, indicating it had
    > already dumped in me. The doctor told me that had it happened 20 years
    > ago, I wouldn't have lived.
    >
    >
    >> Excellent stuff John. Good health mate.

    >
    >
    > Thank you, kind sir. I'll certainly try to do my part. No cigarettes. No
    > alcohol. No cussin'. But plenty of Frank's Hot Sauce, Tabasco,
    > horseradish, hot tea, ...! ;-)


    Heh.

    --
    Moog

    "Some mornings it just doesn't seem worth it to gnaw through the
    leather straps."

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