adding a hard drive to a system - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on adding a hard drive to a system - Ubuntu ; I inherited a better box then the one I was using. So I pulled my hard drives out of my old box and slapped them in the new box. Fiddled around awhile in order to get x working again and ...

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  1. adding a hard drive to a system

    I inherited a better box then the one I was using. So I pulled my hard
    drives out of my old box and slapped them in the new box. Fiddled around
    awhile in order to get x working again and then formatted the drive that
    was in the box originally running windows 2000. I made it one big 80 gig
    ext3 partition and gave it a home in fstab. It mounts just fine on its
    own etc. The problem that I am running into is that the two drives that
    I had originally were pretty small and the machine thinks it is out of
    space. I am not able to upgrade from 6.10 to 7.04 because of limited
    disk space. How do I make the newly partioned drive available across the
    board for all applications? I am at work now on an xp box, but can vnc
    over ssh to the linux box at home to try and fix this. Any help would be
    greatly appreciated.

    Ryan

  2. Re: adding a hard drive to a system

    usenet identity writes:

    > I inherited a better box then the one I was using. So I pulled my hard
    > drives out of my old box and slapped them in the new box. Fiddled
    > around awhile in order to get x working again and then formatted the
    > drive that was in the box originally running windows 2000. I made it
    > one big 80 gig ext3 partition and gave it a home in fstab. It mounts
    > just fine on its own etc. The problem that I am running into is that
    > the two drives that I had originally were pretty small and the machine
    > thinks it is out of space. I am not able to upgrade from 6.10 to 7.04
    > because of limited disk space. How do I make the newly partioned drive
    > available across the board for all applications? I am at work now on
    > an xp box, but can vnc over ssh to the linux box at home to try and
    > fix this. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Ryan


    You could start by moving either /var or /home to the large drive. Maybe
    both.

    Assuming both:

    repartition the large drive to be something like 50 gig & 30 gig for
    /home and /var


    create two mount points for the new partitions in order to copy data over

    mkdir ~/newhome
    mkdir ~/newvar

    assuming hdax and hday are the device names (/dev/hda) of the two partitions:

    mount /dev/hdax newhome
    mount /dev/hday newvar

    copy recursively with archive flag on

    sudo cp -ar /home/* newhome
    sudo cp -ar /var/* newvar

    edit your fstab and mount hdax and hday as home and var respectively.

    reboot.

    Note, I haven't tested these actual lines and they are there for
    guidance, read it carefully before going ahead. BACK THINGS UP FIRST.


    --
    A shy teenage boy finally worked up the nerve to give a gift to
    Madonna, a young puppy. It hitched its waggin' to a star.

  3. Re: adding a hard drive to a system

    Hadron wrote:
    > usenet identity writes:
    >
    >> I inherited a better box then the one I was using. So I pulled my hard
    >> drives out of my old box and slapped them in the new box. Fiddled
    >> around awhile in order to get x working again and then formatted the
    >> drive that was in the box originally running windows 2000. I made it
    >> one big 80 gig ext3 partition and gave it a home in fstab. It mounts
    >> just fine on its own etc. The problem that I am running into is that
    >> the two drives that I had originally were pretty small and the machine
    >> thinks it is out of space. I am not able to upgrade from 6.10 to 7.04
    >> because of limited disk space. How do I make the newly partioned drive
    >> available across the board for all applications? I am at work now on
    >> an xp box, but can vnc over ssh to the linux box at home to try and
    >> fix this. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    >>
    >> Ryan

    >
    > You could start by moving either /var or /home to the large drive. Maybe
    > both.
    >
    > Assuming both:
    >
    > repartition the large drive to be something like 50 gig & 30 gig for
    > /home and /var
    >
    >
    > create two mount points for the new partitions in order to copy data over
    >
    > mkdir ~/newhome
    > mkdir ~/newvar
    >
    > assuming hdax and hday are the device names (/dev/hda) of the two partitions:
    >
    > mount /dev/hdax newhome
    > mount /dev/hday newvar


    Since this is the second drive on the first controller I would be using
    hdb1 and hdb2, right? Sorry for such newb questions, but I am new to
    some of this.
    >
    > copy recursively with archive flag on
    >
    > sudo cp -ar /home/* newhome
    > sudo cp -ar /var/* newvar
    >
    > edit your fstab and mount hdax and hday as home and var respectively.
    >
    > reboot.
    >
    > Note, I haven't tested these actual lines and they are there for
    > guidance, read it carefully before going ahead. BACK THINGS UP FIRST.
    >
    >



    Thanks for the starting point. Just tried to ssh in to poke around and
    get familiar with what I already have going on, but realized that I did
    not restart the dynamic ip updater on the network after installing the
    new router on Sunday.

    O.K. now to ask some more simple questions. I have a mount point called
    windows swap space. It is the directory that is open to anyone on the
    home network through samba. It is where my wife and I started ripping
    down all of our cds. Since that is what is really taking up most of the
    space on the system I would probably be well served to move it off onto
    the larger drive and give it a good chunk of it, right? Then I could
    dedicate the hard drive space that it was taking up to /home and /var if
    need be. I believe that I am getting it. Thanks again.

    Ryan


  4. Re: adding a hard drive to a system

    So it turns out that it wasn't the dynamic ip updater that was down. It
    is my home phone line. They say they have to have someone there when the
    tech comes out, so I am out of luck with internet until Saturday at the
    earliest.

    I did some poking around last night while I was home and found that I
    currently have three partitions on my disks. The large one being
    extended. Is there a way to just meld the new disk into the available
    extended space?

    Ryan

  5. Re: adding a hard drive to a system

    usenet identity wrote:
    > So it turns out that it wasn't the dynamic ip updater that was down.
    > It is my home phone line. They say they have to have someone there
    > when the tech comes out, so I am out of luck with internet until
    > Saturday at the earliest.
    >
    > I did some poking around last night while I was home and found that I
    > currently have three partitions on my disks. The large one being
    > extended. Is there a way to just meld the new disk into the available
    > extended space?
    >
    > Ryan



    You can move data to any partition, on any drive (on any computer, on
    any continent). To get it to work, it must be properly named, and the
    fstab must have the proper mount points.

    Many OSes may not be able to boot from an extended (logical) partition
    though. They need to be on a primary partition, of which you can have
    four on an IDE disk (hda1-hda4).

    (You can have two hard disks on the first (or only) IDE controller
    channel, a master and a slave: hda and hdb. If you have two IDE
    controller channels, like most modern PCs, then you can have four hard
    drives (hda-hdd), with hdc and hdd on the second IDE channel as the
    master and the slave.

    Usually the optical drive(s) (CD/CD-R/CD-RW/DVD/etc.) is/are put on the
    second IDE controller channel. They are slower than hard drives, and if
    on the same channel as a hard drive, the channel will only run at the
    lower speed.

    SCSI is different, and I won't go into it here. Generally ATA, or PATA,
    is the same as IDE (or EIDE) in partitioning. I don't use SATA, so I
    can't comment. Someone will, I'm sure. ;-)

    You can look up the definitions of these terms using something like
    Wikipedia at http://www.wikipedia.org

    Here is a great reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_IDE

    You can certainly use an extended partition for any non-bootable mount
    points though. Usually a GNU/Linux partitioning operation will use hda2
    as the extended partition (the "container") for hda5 through hda16.

    Here is a link to a good HOWTO: http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Partition

    Something very useful that you may always have a need to know. You can
    study it while the phone company jerks you around.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

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