When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream - Ubuntu ; How long have notebooks been outselling desktops/servers? When will 64 bit be mainstream? I am so frustrated. I have two 64bit notebooks. One purchased July 2005 and the other in Aug 2007, an X2. Why do I still have to ...

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Thread: When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

  1. When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

    How long have notebooks been outselling desktops/servers?

    When will 64 bit be mainstream?

    I am so frustrated. I have two 64bit notebooks. One purchased July
    2005 and the other in Aug 2007, an X2. Why do I still have to **** with
    32 bit? Where is 64 bit Wireless? It's about time.

    When is 64bit to be the default and 32 bit to be the stepchild?

  2. Re: When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

    yoyo, on 08/31/2007 11:33 PM said:
    > How long have notebooks been outselling desktops/servers?
    >
    > When will 64 bit be mainstream?
    >
    > I am so frustrated. I have two 64bit notebooks. One purchased July
    > 2005 and the other in Aug 2007, an X2. Why do I still have to **** with
    > 32 bit? Where is 64 bit Wireless? It's about time.
    >
    > When is 64bit to be the default and 32 bit to be the stepchild?


    I don't know---but I, too, am waiting on that day. There are still
    several instabilities all across 64-bit systems. Granted, 64-bit Linux
    boxes are far more usable than 64-bit Windows systems, but there are
    little things here and there that need improvement. If only I knew how
    to do it, I could work on some of it...

    Though, one of the problems with Feisty's 64-bit release was that GAIM
    was horribly broken in the 64-bit version. Pidgin no longer is, at least.

    -- Mike

    --
    Michael B. Trausch http://www.trausch.us/
    Pidgin 2.1.1 and plugins for Ubuntu Feisty! http://www.trausch.us/pidgin

  3. Re: When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

    Hi Mike,

    Am Sat, 01 Sep 2007 01:20:55 -0400 schrieb Michael Trausch:

    > I don't know---but I, too, am waiting on that day. There are still
    > several instabilities all across 64-bit systems. Granted, 64-bit Linux
    > boxes are far more usable than 64-bit Windows systems, but there are
    > little things here and there that need improvement. If only I knew how
    > to do it, I could work on some of it...


    But the problem is really simple. Because 32-bit int was the biggest data
    type to pass on the stack, all 64-bit data was passed by reference. Simply
    scan all C/C++ sources to find parameter passing of 64-bit values. Do this
    for all programs youu need, and you are done. Next make sure you have
    converted all external data structures and here you are :-).

    regards, Kurt

    --
    Kurt Harders
    PiN GmbH
    http://www.pin-gmbh.com

  4. Re: When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

    yoyo wrote:

    > How long have notebooks been outselling desktops/servers?
    >
    > When will 64 bit be mainstream?


    I would say "when the market decides so". So, as soon as the majority of
    buyers "I want a 64-bit system" it will be so.

    > I am so frustrated. I have two 64bit notebooks. One purchased July
    > 2005 and the other in Aug 2007, an X2. Why do I still have to **** with
    > 32 bit? Where is 64 bit Wireless? It's about time.


    Regarding hardware, I'm quite sure 64 bit CPU's/chipsets are outselling 32
    bit CPU's/chipsets already: just look at the shops.

    So I guess your question is about the OS, drivers, applications. And there
    the majority is indeed still 32-bit.

    What's the advantage of a 64-bit software? I would say: use of 4+ GB
    memory / files. That would mean that as soon as computers have 4+ GB of
    RAM, 64-bit OSes will be standard. A typical laptop now has 2 GB of RAM, so
    in two years it will be 4 GB, and I expect 64-bit OSes on those computers.


    > When is 64bit to be the default and 32 bit to be the stepchild?


    de Kameel


  5. Re: When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

    Kurt Harders, on 09/01/2007 05:08 AM said:
    > Hi Mike,
    >
    > Am Sat, 01 Sep 2007 01:20:55 -0400 schrieb Michael Trausch:
    >
    >> there are little things here and there that need improvement. If
    >> only I knew how to do it, I could work on some of it...

    >
    > But the problem is really simple. Because 32-bit int was the biggest
    > data type to pass on the stack, all 64-bit data was passed by
    > reference. Simply scan all C/C++ sources to find parameter passing of
    > 64-bit values. Do this for all programs youu need, and you are done.
    > Next make sure you have converted all external data structures and
    > here you are :-).
    >


    lol... Yeah, but while I am great at coming up with solutions in shell
    script or other languages for various purposes, I still stink when it
    comes to C code. For that matter, I largely stink at reading the code
    of others. I can fix minor things here in there in C code if the fix is
    apparant to me (e.g., someone renamed something and didn't change it
    everywhere, I can fix /that/), but I have a ways to go with C/C++ before
    I could consider myself close to competent enough in it to fully
    understand the implications of any non-trivial changes that I make to
    other people's code.

    -- Mike

    --
    Michael B. Trausch http://www.trausch.us/
    Pidgin 2.1.1 and plugins for Ubuntu Feisty! http://www.trausch.us/pidgin

  6. Re: When will 64bit and notebooks be mainstream

    de Kameel, on 09/01/2007 05:58 AM said:
    >
    > What's the advantage of a 64-bit software? I would say: use of 4+ GB
    > memory / files. That would mean that as soon as computers have 4+ GB
    > of RAM, 64-bit OSes will be standard. A typical laptop now has 2 GB
    > of RAM, so in two years it will be 4 GB, and I expect 64-bit OSes on
    > those computers.
    >


    There are also performance advantages: AMD64 systems have more
    registers than a "pure" IA32 system does, which makes it possible for
    more application data to be in lower-latency areas of the system.
    Combined with the fact that many of these registers are larger than on
    pure IA32 systems (or AMD64 systems in IA32 mode, for that matter), it's
    a good advantage to have.

    I would suppose that there are others, but I am not all that intimate
    with any other benefits that there might be outside of a larger memory
    space and more registers.

    -- Mike

    --
    Michael B. Trausch http://www.trausch.us/
    Pidgin 2.1.1 and plugins for Ubuntu Feisty! http://www.trausch.us/pidgin

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