Veritas snapshot + rsync vs. rsync alone - Tools

This is a discussion on Veritas snapshot + rsync vs. rsync alone - Tools ; I may be doing overkill in my current backup scheme. I am making Veritas snapshots of my "active" volumes - not real busy, maybe a dozen files written to every 10 minutes or so - and then doing rsync to ...

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Thread: Veritas snapshot + rsync vs. rsync alone

  1. Veritas snapshot + rsync vs. rsync alone

    I may be doing overkill in my current backup scheme. I am making
    Veritas snapshots of my "active" volumes - not real busy, maybe a dozen
    files written to every 10 minutes or so - and then doing rsync to make
    remote copies of these volumes.

    Do you think this is being too cautious? I ran an experiment of using
    rsync on a text file that was currently being written to, and the only
    bad result was the last line was left in a partial state. Is this
    about what I can expect if I skip the snapshot step? The only type
    files that would be changing during backups would be text files.

    The snapshots are fast, but the "SnapBack" steps take about 40 minutes
    to complete, so I would like to eliminate that step if it safe to do
    so.

    Boyd


  2. Re: Veritas snapshot + rsync vs. rsync alone

    I did a test yesterday in which I used a perl script to write to 10
    files - five text files, five "binary" files (random numbers with no
    line-feeds - I did put in 'EOL' text at the end of the print statements
    so I could see where the break-off points were. I wrote random amount
    of data to all 10 in a loop, repeatedly.

    Then, while the above script was running, I did a SnapShot of the
    volume (a mirrored volume under Veritas VM on a Solaris 9 Ultra II +
    A5100 StorEdge), and then did rsync to the remote host. I then
    examined the 10 files, and saw that all of the files had a nice cut off
    at the end of the line (or "EOL" on the "binary" files) on the last
    line of the file.

    Next, I repeated the process, skipping the SnapShot step. Instead, I
    just did rsync -a on the active volume to the remote host. When I
    examined the 10 files, again they were all cleanly terminated at the
    end of a line (or "EOL" on the "binary" files).

    I was happily surprised at this result.
    Boyd


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