TCP/IP books... - TCP-IP

This is a discussion on TCP/IP books... - TCP-IP ; I need to buy some books about TCP/IP (low-level stuff like header format, sequencing, etc) and I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a few titles that are up-to-date (I suspect that the W. Richard Stevens books might be a ...

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  1. TCP/IP books...

    I need to buy some books about TCP/IP (low-level stuff like header format,
    sequencing, etc) and I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a few
    titles that are up-to-date (I suspect that the W. Richard Stevens books
    might be a bit outdated but if that's not the case, let me know).




  2. Re: TCP/IP books...

    On Mar 16, 8:32 pm, "barcaroller" wrote:
    > I need to buy some books about TCP/IP (low-level stuff like header format,
    > sequencing, etc) and I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a few
    > titles that are up-to-date (I suspect that the W. Richard Stevens books
    > might be a bit outdated but if that's not the case, let me know).


    Richard Stevens' book is still very relevant and probably the best
    reference out there.

    You might also find the following link useful. Many TCP concepts have
    been explained with sequence diagrams:

    http://www.eventhelix.com/RealtimeMantra/Networking/

    --
    EventStudio 4.0 - http://www.EventHelix.com/EventStudio
    Design and Document Protocol Interactions as Sequence Diagrams


  3. Re: TCP/IP books...

    On Mar 16, 7:32 pm, "barcaroller" wrote:
    > I need to buy some books about TCP/IP (low-level stuff like header format,
    > sequencing, etc) and I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a few
    > titles that are up-to-date (I suspect that the W. Richard Stevens books
    > might be a bit outdated but if that's not the case, let me know).


    Stevens' book by far is the best one and the most easiest to read and
    understand. It is a little bit outdated ( not a lot though). Two more
    books which are on par with the Stevens' book are "Internetworking
    with TCP/IP by Douglas E Comer" and "Computer Networks, A Systems
    Approach by Larry L Peterson and Bruce S Davie". These three should
    see you through pretty good.






  4. Re: TCP/IP books...

    In article <1174160758.658010.120970@y80g2000hsf.googlegroups. com>,
    Kalyan Manchikanti wrote:

    >> I need to buy some books about TCP/IP (low-level stuff like header format,
    >> sequencing, etc) and I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a few
    >> titles that are up-to-date (I suspect that the W. Richard Stevens books
    >> might be a bit outdated but if that's not the case, let me know).

    >
    >Stevens' book by far is the best one and the most easiest to read and
    >understand. It is a little bit outdated ( not a lot though). Two more
    >books which are on par with the Stevens' book are "Internetworking
    >with TCP/IP by Douglas E Comer" and "Computer Networks, A Systems
    >Approach by Larry L Peterson and Bruce S Davie". These three should
    >see you through pretty good.


    I disagree. If you really need more than one book (probably Stevens')
    to get the superficial gloss on TCP/IP that is all that any good TCP
    textbook can give, then for whatever reasons, perhaps insufficent
    interest or background knowledge, you can't use 3 or 30 books. On the
    other hand, if one book is illuminating, then you should advance from
    that book to the RFCs themselves. Things that are not in Stevens' book,
    such as Large Windows or ECN, is best discovered in the RFCs.

    After or while reading the RFCs, read code implementing TCP/IP, such as
    http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/cvsweb.cgi/src/sys/netinet/

    If you already know the basic ideas in TCP/IP and need only "low-level
    stuff like header [formats]," it is best to go straight to the code and RFCs.
    http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/cvsweb.cg...tcp.h?rev=1.35
    defines TCP headers and lots of other stuff.


    Disregard the advertising of the professional digestors such as
    textbook publishers and providers of seminars, books, and tapes.
    Don't assume you need the help of a guru without making an honest
    attempt to understand the raw, unfiltered, undigested stuff that
    is the world. If you do need a guru, a good one will do far for
    you after you've tried on your own.


    Vernon Schryver vjs@rhyolite.com

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