Why does pinging amazon.com time out? - TCP-IP

This is a discussion on Why does pinging amazon.com time out? - TCP-IP ; I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out. Yet I can pull Amazon web pages with no problem. How can that be? Thanks, Peter...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

  1. Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out. Yet I can
    pull Amazon web pages with no problem. How can that be?

    Thanks,

    Peter


  2. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    sduraybito@go.com writes:
    > I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out. Yet I can
    > pull Amazon web pages with no problem. How can that be?


    Their edge router filters pings into oblivion.

  3. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    From:

    | I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out. Yet I can
    | pull Amazon web pages with no problem. How can that be?
    |
    | Thanks,
    |
    | Peter

    Security !
    Using the Ping command is no guarantee of a way to test if an Internet site is "up".

    For example, you can't ping my WAN address.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm



  4. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    David H. Lipman wrote:

    > From:
    >
    > | I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out. Yet I can
    > | pull Amazon web pages with no problem. How can that be?
    > |
    > | Thanks,
    > |
    > | Peter
    >
    > Security !
    > Using the Ping command is no guarantee of a way to test if an Internet
    > site is "up".
    >
    > For example, you can't ping my WAN address.
    >

    what is the best way?

  5. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    In article ,
    ibaloubi wrote:
    >David H. Lipman wrote:


    >> From:


    >> | I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out.


    >> Using the Ping command is no guarantee of a way to test if an Internet
    >> site is "up".


    >what is the best way?


    What is the best way to do what, exactly?

    If the question is what the best way is to determine whether
    www.amazon.com is up, then the answer is "attempt to view the web page".
    If you don't get an answer, then either their servers are not up,
    or something is blocking access, or you have a problem at your end.
    Distinguishing these three cases can be quite difficult.


  6. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    Walter Roberson wrote:

    > In article ,
    > ibaloubi wrote:
    >>David H. Lipman wrote:

    >
    >>> From:

    >
    >>> | I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out.

    >
    >>> Using the Ping command is no guarantee of a way to test if an Internet
    >>> site is "up".

    >
    >>what is the best way?

    >
    > What is the best way to do what, exactly?
    >
    > If the question is what the best way is to determine whether
    > www.amazon.com is up, then the answer is "attempt to view the web page".
    > If you don't get an answer, then either their servers are not up,
    > or something is blocking access, or you have a problem at your end.
    > Distinguishing these three cases can be quite difficult.

    thinking about determining if a host is up or not.
    pinging seems the only alternative, maybe combined with portscanning

  7. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    ibaloubi wrote:

    > Walter Roberson wrote:
    >
    >> In article ,
    >> ibaloubi wrote:
    >>>David H. Lipman wrote:

    >>
    >>>> From:

    >>
    >>>> | I ping www.amazon.com and keep getting Request timed out.

    >>
    >>>> Using the Ping command is no guarantee of a way to test if an Internet
    >>>> site is "up".

    >>
    >>>what is the best way?

    >>
    >> What is the best way to do what, exactly?
    >>
    >> If the question is what the best way is to determine whether
    >> www.amazon.com is up, then the answer is "attempt to view the web page".
    >> If you don't get an answer, then either their servers are not up,
    >> or something is blocking access, or you have a problem at your end.
    >> Distinguishing these three cases can be quite difficult.

    > thinking about determining if a host is up or not.
    > pinging seems the only alternative, maybe combined with portscanning

    ah, it was a question, is there a better way than those two?

  8. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    In article ,
    ibaloubi wrote:
    >ibaloubi wrote:


    >> Walter Roberson wrote:


    >>> What is the best way to do what, exactly?


    >>> If the question is what the best way is to determine whether
    >>> www.amazon.com is up, then the answer is "attempt to view the web page".
    >>> If you don't get an answer, then either their servers are not up,
    >>> or something is blocking access, or you have a problem at your end.
    >>> Distinguishing these three cases can be quite difficult.


    >> thinking about determining if a host is up or not.
    >> pinging seems the only alternative, maybe combined with portscanning


    >ah, it was a question, is there a better way than those two?


    There is a third way: call the system owner and ask them.

    If that isn't practical then, as I said, "distinguishing these
    three cases can be quite difficult". Hosts (and firewalls) can be
    configured to respond to everyone *except* whichever computers you
    happen to use to try to access the hosts: if a system is deliberately
    ignoring you completely, it is difficult to automate checking to see
    whether the system is up or not.

    It is particularily difficult to check to see if a system is up if
    the system is up but the network infrastructure is broken, such as
    if the NIC on the system broke. Does it do you any good to know that,
    Yes, amazon.com is up, but that it can't talk to the outside world?


  9. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    In article <0_LDg.390796$IK3.328322@pd7tw1no>,
    Walter Roberson wrote:
    >In article ,
    >ibaloubi wrote:


    >>> thinking about determining if a host is up or not.


    >>> pinging seems the only alternative, maybe combined with portscanning

    >
    >>ah, it was a question, is there a better way than those two?

    >
    >There is a third way: call the system owner and ask them.
    >
    >If that isn't practical then, as I said, "distinguishing these
    >three cases can be quite difficult". Hosts (and firewalls) can be


    > Does it do you any good to know that,
    >Yes, amazon.com is up, but that it can't talk to the outside world?


    Exactly. For an outsider without access to the console of the system,
    the question "Is the host up?" cannot mean more than "Do the applications
    I care about work?" As far as any of the large number of computers
    that receive HTTP requests for www.amazon.com are concerned, a sane
    outsider can only ask "Does it (or they) talk to my web browser?"

    An insider might ask any of
    - Does it answer the console?
    - Does it answer control requests (e.g. ssh or snmp) from the local newtork?
    - Does it answer ICMP, TCP SYNs, or UDP from afar?
    If so, does it answer TCP SYNs with more than RST or ICMP Unreachable?
    - Does it answer other applications?

    For an outsider, the question "Is the host up?" makes no more literal
    sense than "Is Dana healthy?" for a stranger known only by name and not
    by birth date or even gender. This is particularly true for amazon.com,
    because Amazon uses Akamai. The computer that answers to the name
    "amazon.com" depends on who is asking, when, from where, and perhaps
    even for what.

    In other words, the answer to the question "How do I determine whether
    a host is up?" starts with learning so much about computer and networks
    in general that you don't need to ask the question, at least not as it
    seems intended in this case as more than "Does http://amazon.com/ work?"


    Vernon Schryver vjs@rhyolite.com

  10. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?

    Trace route (traceroute on unix, tracert on windows) is very helpful
    to see if you are even
    reaching the network. --Austin

    Vernon Schryver wrote:
    > In article <0_LDg.390796$IK3.328322@pd7tw1no>,
    > Walter Roberson wrote:
    > >In article ,
    > >ibaloubi wrote:

    >
    > >>> thinking about determining if a host is up or not.

    >
    > >>> pinging seems the only alternative, maybe combined with portscanning

    > >
    > >>ah, it was a question, is there a better way than those two?

    > >
    > >There is a third way: call the system owner and ask them.
    > >
    > >If that isn't practical then, as I said, "distinguishing these
    > >three cases can be quite difficult". Hosts (and firewalls) can be

    >
    > > Does it do you any good to know that,
    > >Yes, amazon.com is up, but that it can't talk to the outside world?

    >
    > Exactly. For an outsider without access to the console of the system,
    > the question "Is the host up?" cannot mean more than "Do the applications
    > I care about work?" As far as any of the large number of computers
    > that receive HTTP requests for www.amazon.com are concerned, a sane
    > outsider can only ask "Does it (or they) talk to my web browser?"
    >
    > An insider might ask any of
    > - Does it answer the console?
    > - Does it answer control requests (e.g. ssh or snmp) from the local newtork?
    > - Does it answer ICMP, TCP SYNs, or UDP from afar?
    > If so, does it answer TCP SYNs with more than RST or ICMP Unreachable?
    > - Does it answer other applications?
    >
    > For an outsider, the question "Is the host up?" makes no more literal
    > sense than "Is Dana healthy?" for a stranger known only by name and not
    > by birth date or even gender. This is particularly true for amazon.com,
    > because Amazon uses Akamai. The computer that answers to the name
    > "amazon.com" depends on who is asking, when, from where, and perhaps
    > even for what.
    >
    > In other words, the answer to the question "How do I determine whether
    > a host is up?" starts with learning so much about computer and networks
    > in general that you don't need to ask the question, at least not as it
    > seems intended in this case as more than "Does http://amazon.com/ work?"
    >
    >
    > Vernon Schryver vjs@rhyolite.com



  11. Re: Why does pinging amazon.com time out?


    adholiday@gmail.com wrote:
    > Trace route (traceroute on unix, tracert on windows) is very helpful
    > to see if you are even
    > reaching the network. --Austin



    Please don't top-post.

    Again, assuming that traceroutes are not blocked by firewalls, are
    responded to by the host in question, etc...

    And remember that Windows tracert and traditional *nix traceroute use
    different packets for their probes.


+ Reply to Thread