33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free? - TCP-IP

This is a discussion on 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free? - TCP-IP ; Dear NewsGroup Readers, During the testing of my visitor counter I generated random IP addresses against an IP/Country database. 16,641 random addresses is an significant sample for 99% confidence level, 1 confidence range on a 4,008,640,512 IP population available for ...

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Thread: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

  1. 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    Dear NewsGroup Readers,

    During the testing of my visitor counter I generated random IP
    addresses against an IP/Country database.

    16,641 random addresses is an significant sample for 99% confidence
    level, 1 confidence range on a 4,008,640,512 IP population available
    for the internet (I filtered out multi cast and private network)

    Statistics show 33% +/- 1 is not assigned to any country.

    I trust the database with its 235 distinct countries and territories.

    So wat is the fuzz then about IP shortage or exhaustion? I interpret
    that the 33% is potentially still available for the market. Maybe in
    the hands of people that speculate on rising prices.

    On basis of your responces I will decide to write a Scientia Araneae
    Totius Orbis article about it:

    http://home.zonnet.nl/galien8

    Kind regards,

    Johan van der Galien.


  2. Re: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    When you say "Statistics show 33% +/- 1 is not assigned to any
    country." you mean you were looking-up IPs in a registry somewhere?
    Or were you trying to reach-out and touch those IPs?

    WRT the former, some IP allocations could I suppose be old enough to
    "pre-date" by-country allocation.

    WRT the latter, I suspect a distinction needs to be made between
    "allocated" and "in active use" or "is reachable/is reachable by
    ."

    FWIW I know there are significant chunks of the 15. and 16. address
    space which are not reachable from the broad Internet. I could easily
    see that being the case for other chunks of the space.

    rick jones
    --
    a wide gulf separates "what if" from "if only"
    these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
    feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...

  3. Re: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    On Jul 24, 2:07*pm, gali...@zonnet.nl wrote:
    > Dear NewsGroup Readers,
    >
    > During the testing of my visitor counter I generated random IP
    > addresses against an IP/Country database.
    >
    > 16,641 random addresses is an significant sample for 99% confidence
    > level, 1 confidence range on a 4,008,640,512 IP population available
    > for the internet (I filtered out multi cast and private network)
    >
    > Statistics show 33% +/- 1 is not assigned to any country.
    >
    > I trust the database with its 235 distinct countries and territories.
    >
    > So wat is the fuzz then about IP shortage or exhaustion? I interpret
    > that the 33% is potentially still available for the market. Maybe in
    > the hands of people that speculate on rising prices.


    Why don't you post 10 randomly selected IPs that you claim are not
    assigned? Then you, or someone else, can investigate each one. That
    will at least give you something beyond wild speculation.

    DS

  4. Re: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    On 25 jul, 02:28, David Schwartz wrote:
    >
    > Why don't you post 10 randomly selected IPs that you claim are not
    > assigned? Then you, or someone else, can investigate each one. That
    > will at least give you something beyond wild speculation.
    >

    Thanks David (Rick Jones says almost the same thing) good idea: Ping
    all "Unknown Country" IP's from the 16,641 random ones sample (= about
    5000) with a (MS-DOS: *.bat) script? I know at least this is possible
    with UNIX Korn Shell scripts. So it should be possible also under
    LINUX to. First I try the .bat and otherwise I install LINUX on my
    test machine and try other kinds of (shell) scripts.

    If results are interesting: I publish a number of "5000" IP's lists,
    so you and readers of a possible Scientia Araneae Totius Orbis article
    can verify.

    I keep you posted!

    Kind regards,

    Johan van der Galien.

  5. Re: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    Dear Newsgroup Readers,

    Statistics show:

    http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm

    1,412,489,652 internet connected computers = IP addresses in use = 35%
    of 4,008,640,512

    65% of the IP's is still available, probably most of them in stock
    because companies have large ranges of unused addresses, of which 33%
    is not assigned to any country.

    In principle there is no IP exhaustion yet, stocks should still last
    for several decades.

    Kind regards,

    Johan van der Galien.

  6. Re: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    galien8@zonnet.nl writes in comp.protocols.tcp-ip:

    > Dear NewsGroup Readers,
    >
    > During the testing of my visitor counter I generated random IP
    > addresses against an IP/Country database.
    >
    > 16,641 random addresses is an significant sample for 99% confidence
    > level, 1 confidence range on a 4,008,640,512 IP population available
    > for the internet (I filtered out multi cast and private network)
    >
    > Statistics show 33% +/- 1 is not assigned to any country.


    Check first

    http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space/


    / Kari Hurtta

  7. Re: 33% +/- 1 IPv4 addresses not assigned to any country = free?

    In article <5d63qnterf.fsf@Hurtta06k.keh.iki.fi>,
    Kari Hurtta wrote:
    >galien8@zonnet.nl writes in comp.protocols.tcp-ip:
    >> During the testing of my visitor counter I generated random IP
    >> addresses against an IP/Country database.
    >>
    >> 16,641 random addresses is an significant sample for 99% confidence
    >> level, 1 confidence range on a 4,008,640,512 IP population available
    >> for the internet (I filtered out multi cast and private network)
    >>
    >> Statistics show 33% +/- 1 is not assigned to any country.

    >
    >Check first
    >
    > http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space/


    Don't try to dissuade him with facts :-)

    He's happily confusing allocation assignment with detectable usage on
    the Internet.

    --
    -- Rod --
    rodd(at)polylogics(dot)com

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