help with remote access - TCP-IP

This is a discussion on help with remote access - TCP-IP ; Here is the setup: A cable modem is connected to a switch S1. Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1. XP machine is connected to R1 Switch S2 is connected to R2 W2k3 is connected to S2 ...

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Thread: help with remote access

  1. help with remote access

    Here is the setup:

    A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1.
    XP machine is connected to R1
    Switch S2 is connected to R2
    W2k3 is connected to S2
    I have internet connectivity on both XP and w2k3 machines ( XP - R1 - S1 -
    modem; W2k3 - S2 - R2 - S1 - modem)

    How can I connect to w2k3 from XP via remote desktop, please?

    Thanks!

    PS:
    Before this setup, I had only R2 connected to the modem, XP and w2k3
    connected to R2, and I could connect to w2k3 from XP using remote desktop.



  2. Re: help with remote access

    In article , "eager"
    wrote:

    > Here is the setup:
    >
    > A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    > Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1.


    Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?

    > XP machine is connected to R1
    > Switch S2 is connected to R2
    > W2k3 is connected to S2
    > I have internet connectivity on both XP and w2k3 machines ( XP - R1 - S1 -
    > modem; W2k3 - S2 - R2 - S1 - modem)
    >
    > How can I connect to w2k3 from XP via remote desktop, please?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > PS:
    > Before this setup, I had only R2 connected to the modem, XP and w2k3
    > connected to R2, and I could connect to w2k3 from XP using remote desktop.


    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

  3. Re: help with remote access


    "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    news:barmar-6E51BA.21001409042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > In article , "eager"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Here is the setup:
    >>
    >> A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    >> Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1.

    >
    > Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    > facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?
    >

    The PCs, of course.
    the ones facing the cable modem won't be private IPs ....
    It's all about configuring the routers properly, and these are cheap routers
    ....
    Hopefully, I will get it done ...

    Thanks



  4. Re: help with remote access

    In article ,
    "eager" wrote:

    > "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    > news:barmar-6E51BA.21001409042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > > In article , "eager"
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Here is the setup:
    > >>
    > >> A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    > >> Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1.

    > >
    > > Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    > > facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?
    > >

    > The PCs, of course.
    > the ones facing the cable modem won't be private IPs ....
    > It's all about configuring the routers properly, and these are cheap routers
    > ...
    > Hopefully, I will get it done ...
    >
    > Thanks


    OK, I assume these are typical home broadband routers.

    You need to configure port forwarding on the routers for the port used
    for remote access. Then the remote IP you have to connect to is the
    public IP of the router it's connected to.

    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

  5. Re: help with remote access


    "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    news:barmar-600E74.23373809042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > In article ,
    > "eager" wrote:
    >
    >> "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    >> news:barmar-6E51BA.21001409042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    >> > In article , "eager"
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Here is the setup:
    >> >>
    >> >> A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    >> >> Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1.
    >> >
    >> > Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    >> > facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?
    >> >

    >> The PCs, of course.
    >> the ones facing the cable modem won't be private IPs ....
    >> It's all about configuring the routers properly, and these are cheap
    >> routers
    >> ...
    >> Hopefully, I will get it done ...
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > OK, I assume these are typical home broadband routers.
    >
    > You need to configure port forwarding on the routers for the port used
    > for remote access. Then the remote IP you have to connect to is the
    > public IP of the router it's connected to.
    >


    Probably it would be simpler if I try to draw it and ignore the internet
    connection

    XP(192.168.123.149)--->R1 (192.168.123.254)--->SW1--R2
    (192.168.2.1)--->SW2--->W2K3(192.168.2.10)

    From XP I need to access W2K3 using Remote Desktop. I had no problem when XP
    was connected to R2.


    Thanks!





  6. Re: help with remote access

    In article , "eager"
    wrote:

    > "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    > news:barmar-600E74.23373809042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > > In article ,
    > > "eager" wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    > >> news:barmar-6E51BA.21001409042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > >> > In article , "eager"
    > >> > wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Here is the setup:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    > >> >> Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to S1.
    > >> >
    > >> > Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    > >> > facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?
    > >> >
    > >> The PCs, of course.
    > >> the ones facing the cable modem won't be private IPs ....
    > >> It's all about configuring the routers properly, and these are cheap
    > >> routers
    > >> ...
    > >> Hopefully, I will get it done ...
    > >>
    > >> Thanks

    > >
    > > OK, I assume these are typical home broadband routers.
    > >
    > > You need to configure port forwarding on the routers for the port used
    > > for remote access. Then the remote IP you have to connect to is the
    > > public IP of the router it's connected to.
    > >

    >
    > Probably it would be simpler if I try to draw it and ignore the internet
    > connection
    >
    > XP(192.168.123.149)--->R1 (192.168.123.254)--->SW1--R2
    > (192.168.2.1)--->SW2--->W2K3(192.168.2.10)
    >
    > From XP I need to access W2K3 using Remote Desktop. I had no problem when XP
    > was connected to R2.


    You can't really ignore the Internet connection, unfortunately.

    To do this, you need to route between R1 and R2. This has several
    problems:

    1. They're getting dynamically-assigned external IPs from the ISP, so
    you can't configure static routes.

    2. They might not even be on the same subnet -- many cable modem ISPs
    have several subnets assigned to a cable node, so different clients
    connected to the node will be assigned addresses in different subnets,
    and this can happen even if they're behind the same cable modem.

    3. Most cheap, home broadband routers don't let you configure routing on
    the WAN port.

    So traffic from XP to W2K3 has to go out R1, through the CM to the CMTS,
    and back to R2 through the CM. And to make it come back to R2, you have
    to send to R2's public IP, so you need port forwarding.

    This still has an issue with #1, because you need to connect to a
    dynamic IP. That can be solved using a Dynamic DNS service like
    dyndns.org.

    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

  7. Re: help with remote access


    "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    news:barmar-4A86DC.15433011042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > In article , "eager"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    >> news:barmar-600E74.23373809042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    >> > In article ,
    >> > "eager" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    >> >> news:barmar-6E51BA.21001409042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    >> >> > In article , "eager"
    >> >> >
    >> >> > wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >> Here is the setup:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    >> >> >> Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to
    >> >> >> S1.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    >> >> > facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?
    >> >> >
    >> >> The PCs, of course.
    >> >> the ones facing the cable modem won't be private IPs ....
    >> >> It's all about configuring the routers properly, and these are cheap
    >> >> routers
    >> >> ...
    >> >> Hopefully, I will get it done ...
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks
    >> >
    >> > OK, I assume these are typical home broadband routers.
    >> >
    >> > You need to configure port forwarding on the routers for the port used
    >> > for remote access. Then the remote IP you have to connect to is the
    >> > public IP of the router it's connected to.
    >> >

    >>
    >> Probably it would be simpler if I try to draw it and ignore the internet
    >> connection
    >>
    >> XP(192.168.123.149)--->R1 (192.168.123.254)--->SW1--R2
    >> (192.168.2.1)--->SW2--->W2K3(192.168.2.10)
    >>
    >> From XP I need to access W2K3 using Remote Desktop. I had no problem when
    >> XP
    >> was connected to R2.

    >
    > You can't really ignore the Internet connection, unfortunately.
    >
    > To do this, you need to route between R1 and R2. This has several
    > problems:
    >
    > 1. They're getting dynamically-assigned external IPs from the ISP, so
    > you can't configure static routes.
    >
    > 2. They might not even be on the same subnet -- many cable modem ISPs
    > have several subnets assigned to a cable node, so different clients
    > connected to the node will be assigned addresses in different subnets,
    > and this can happen even if they're behind the same cable modem.
    >
    > 3. Most cheap, home broadband routers don't let you configure routing on
    > the WAN port.
    >
    > So traffic from XP to W2K3 has to go out R1, through the CM to the CMTS,
    > and back to R2 through the CM. And to make it come back to R2, you have
    > to send to R2's public IP, so you need port forwarding.
    >
    > This still has an issue with #1, because you need to connect to a
    > dynamic IP. That can be solved using a Dynamic DNS service like
    > dyndns.org.




    So far, I have configured routing on R1 and from XP I can ping the WAN
    interface of R2, which is a public IP.
    On the other hand, from W2K3 I can ping the WAN interface of R1, which is
    also a public IP.
    Tracert shows 2 hops.
    However, from XP I cannot ping the LAN interface of R2, and from W2K3 I
    cannot ping the LAN interface of R1.
    That means that I have to configure ACLs for in and out, which I don't think
    my routers support ....

    XP and W2K3 are configured for static IP.
    It's true, I do not have static IPs from the ISP. but as long as i do not
    power cycle the modem, my IP won't change.

    I still do not understand why do I have to take into account the internet
    connection ...
    What about if I totally diconnect the modem from the switch and deal with 2
    LAN segments in the same subnet 255.255.0.0 ?

    I appreciate your help!



  8. Re: help with remote access

    In article , "eager"
    wrote:

    > "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    > news:barmar-4A86DC.15433011042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > > In article , "eager"
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    > >> news:barmar-600E74.23373809042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > >> > In article ,
    > >> > "eager" wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> "Barry Margolin" wrote in message
    > >> >> news:barmar-6E51BA.21001409042008@newsgroups.comcast.net...
    > >> >> > In article , "eager"
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > wrote:
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >> Here is the setup:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> A cable modem is connected to a switch S1.
    > >> >> >> Routers R1 (192.168.123.254) and R2 (192.168.2.1) are connected to
    > >> >> >> S1.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Are those the addresses of the interfaces facing the cable modem or
    > >> >> > facing the PCs? What are the other addresses?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> The PCs, of course.
    > >> >> the ones facing the cable modem won't be private IPs ....
    > >> >> It's all about configuring the routers properly, and these are cheap
    > >> >> routers
    > >> >> ...
    > >> >> Hopefully, I will get it done ...
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Thanks
    > >> >
    > >> > OK, I assume these are typical home broadband routers.
    > >> >
    > >> > You need to configure port forwarding on the routers for the port used
    > >> > for remote access. Then the remote IP you have to connect to is the
    > >> > public IP of the router it's connected to.
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> Probably it would be simpler if I try to draw it and ignore the internet
    > >> connection
    > >>
    > >> XP(192.168.123.149)--->R1 (192.168.123.254)--->SW1--R2
    > >> (192.168.2.1)--->SW2--->W2K3(192.168.2.10)
    > >>
    > >> From XP I need to access W2K3 using Remote Desktop. I had no problem when
    > >> XP
    > >> was connected to R2.

    > >
    > > You can't really ignore the Internet connection, unfortunately.
    > >
    > > To do this, you need to route between R1 and R2. This has several
    > > problems:
    > >
    > > 1. They're getting dynamically-assigned external IPs from the ISP, so
    > > you can't configure static routes.
    > >
    > > 2. They might not even be on the same subnet -- many cable modem ISPs
    > > have several subnets assigned to a cable node, so different clients
    > > connected to the node will be assigned addresses in different subnets,
    > > and this can happen even if they're behind the same cable modem.
    > >
    > > 3. Most cheap, home broadband routers don't let you configure routing on
    > > the WAN port.
    > >
    > > So traffic from XP to W2K3 has to go out R1, through the CM to the CMTS,
    > > and back to R2 through the CM. And to make it come back to R2, you have
    > > to send to R2's public IP, so you need port forwarding.
    > >
    > > This still has an issue with #1, because you need to connect to a
    > > dynamic IP. That can be solved using a Dynamic DNS service like
    > > dyndns.org.

    >
    >
    >
    > So far, I have configured routing on R1 and from XP I can ping the WAN
    > interface of R2, which is a public IP.'
    > On the other hand, from W2K3 I can ping the WAN interface of R1, which is
    > also a public IP.
    > Tracert shows 2 hops.
    > However, from XP I cannot ping the LAN interface of R2, and from W2K3 I
    > cannot ping the LAN interface of R1.
    > That means that I have to configure ACLs for in and out, which I don't think
    > my routers support ....


    If these are typical home routers, they don't support routing directly
    to LAN addresses. They do everything with NAT and port forwarding.

    > XP and W2K3 are configured for static IP.
    > It's true, I do not have static IPs from the ISP. but as long as i do not
    > power cycle the modem, my IP won't change.


    Unless the ISP decides to change the subnet out from under you. DHCP
    addresses are leased, not permanent. Although with many ISPs, they
    change very infrequently.

    >
    > I still do not understand why do I have to take into account the internet
    > connection ...
    > What about if I totally diconnect the modem from the switch and deal with 2
    > LAN segments in the same subnet 255.255.0.0 ?


    If you configure them with static WAN addresses that are on the same
    subnet, then you don't need to worry about the Internet. I was trying
    to address the more general case.

    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

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