Was I an unwitting Internet shortcut? - TCP-IP

This is a discussion on Was I an unwitting Internet shortcut? - TCP-IP ; I recently started working from home, and got a dedicated work DSL line put in. This is in addition to my existing home DSL line, which is with a different ISP. Since both have 10 GB monthly limits, I want ...

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Thread: Was I an unwitting Internet shortcut?

  1. Was I an unwitting Internet shortcut?

    I recently started working from home, and got a dedicated work DSL
    line put in. This is in addition to my existing home DSL line, which
    is with a different ISP.
    Since both have 10 GB monthly limits, I want to separate "home"
    traffic from "work" traffic, so my daughters wouldn't eat into my work
    quota.
    However, I do want to share files between the two zones, so I
    configured the private sides of both DSL routers onto the same subnet
    (192.168.0.1/24 and 192.168.0.128/24), and put a cable between the two
    routers. All the home computers use .1 as their gateway, while all the
    work computers use .128 as theirs.
    This worked, except for one question which will be the subject of
    another posting.
    However, the trouble started when I lost one DSL line for a few hours,
    and changed those computers' gateway addresses manually to allow them
    to use the other DSL line. I put it back once the failed DSL line came
    good, but I wondered if I could get the routers to do the process
    automatically. I found that RIP had been disabled on both routers, so
    I turned them both on. RIPv2, multicast.

    One week later, both my accounts had blown their 10 GB limits. So, I
    am wondering if both my routers advertised the other router's
    information back to their ISPs, which used this "shortcut" between the
    two ISPs to route traffic?

    Needless to say, I've turned RIP off!

  2. Re: Was I an unwitting Internet shortcut?

    In article
    ,
    JohnAdriaan@gmail.com wrote:

    > I recently started working from home, and got a dedicated work DSL
    > line put in. This is in addition to my existing home DSL line, which
    > is with a different ISP.
    > Since both have 10 GB monthly limits, I want to separate "home"
    > traffic from "work" traffic, so my daughters wouldn't eat into my work
    > quota.
    > However, I do want to share files between the two zones, so I
    > configured the private sides of both DSL routers onto the same subnet
    > (192.168.0.1/24 and 192.168.0.128/24), and put a cable between the two
    > routers. All the home computers use .1 as their gateway, while all the
    > work computers use .128 as theirs.
    > This worked, except for one question which will be the subject of
    > another posting.
    > However, the trouble started when I lost one DSL line for a few hours,
    > and changed those computers' gateway addresses manually to allow them
    > to use the other DSL line. I put it back once the failed DSL line came
    > good, but I wondered if I could get the routers to do the process
    > automatically. I found that RIP had been disabled on both routers, so
    > I turned them both on. RIPv2, multicast.
    >
    > One week later, both my accounts had blown their 10 GB limits. So, I
    > am wondering if both my routers advertised the other router's
    > information back to their ISPs, which used this "shortcut" between the
    > two ISPs to route traffic?
    >
    > Needless to say, I've turned RIP off!


    Very unlikely. Your routers should only be doing RIP on the LAN. And
    even if they're trying to do RIP on the WAN, the ISPs should not be
    accepting routes from random customers. And even if they did, the only
    routes your routers know about are their 192.168.0.0/24 LAN subnets and
    a default route.

    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

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