IPV6 VS IPV4 - TCP-IP

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Thread: IPV6 VS IPV4

  1. IPV6 VS IPV4

    Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?


  2. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    On 2007-12-15, SpreadTooThin wrote:
    > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?


    That is a very open question and a suitably detailed answer would
    be long and not really suited to a news post, especially given that
    many comparisions already exist. Do some general reading on it.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipv6 is as good a place to start as
    any.

    --
    Andrew Smallshaw
    andrews@sdf.lonestar.org

  3. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    SpreadTooThin wrote:
    > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?


    About 20 bytes.

  4. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    SpreadTooThin wrote:
    > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?
    >


    When is the homework or take home exam due ?

  5. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    On Dec 15, 5:12 pm, Justa Lurker wrote:
    > SpreadTooThin wrote:
    > > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?

    >
    > When is the homework or take home exam due ?


    Son I left school 25 years ago... Maybe you should show your elders
    some respect.


  6. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    On Dec 15, 4:12 pm, Justa Lurker wrote:
    > SpreadTooThin wrote:
    > > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?

    >
    > When is the homework or take home exam due ?


    Justa,

    You keep prowling all the email groups, you do not answer any
    questions, you do not have
    any knowledge of the subject, and the following is your standard
    quotes.

    "> When is the homework or take home exam due ?"

    I found you posting the exact same words on many different groups.

    Group readers please ignore this person.

    Thanks.


  7. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4


    "SpreadTooThin" wrote in message
    news:7a8b04a3-ac68-4370-b9dd-9ee39b031957@i29g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
    > On Dec 15, 5:12 pm, Justa Lurker wrote:
    >> SpreadTooThin wrote:
    >> > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?

    >>
    >> When is the homework or take home exam due ?

    >
    > Son I left school 25 years ago... Maybe you should show your elders
    > some respect.
    >


    Maybe you should show some respect too.

    If you do not know anything about IPv4, I find it disrespectful to post a
    question about the difference between IPv4 and IPv6.
    And, a person that knows about IPv4 would never post a question like yours.

    You should post more specific questions, and even so, after you do some
    studying on your own. It's very simple, JFGI!

    Anyway, since you are too lazy to do that, I will do it for you this time:

    - Address size

    Addresses in IPv6 are 128 bits long versus 32 bits in IPv4. The drawback of
    the large address size is that IPv6 carries some bandwidth overhead over
    IPv4, which may hurt regions where bandwidth is limited (header compression
    can sometimes be used to alleviate this problem). This also makes human
    memorisation of IPv6 addresses much harder compared to IPv4 addresses, often
    impossible due to their length; use of the Domain Name System (DNS) is
    necessary.
    - Configuration

    IPv6 hosts can be configured automatically when connected to a routed IPv6
    network. When first connected to a network, a host sends a link-local
    multicast request for its configuration parameters; if configured suitably,
    routers respond to such a request with a router advertisement packet that
    contains network-layer configuration parameters. If IPv6 autoconfiguration
    is not suitable, a host can use stateful configuration (DHCPv6) or be
    configured manually. Stateless autoconfiguration is only suitable for hosts:
    routers must be configured manually or by other means.

    - Multicast

    Multicast is part of the base specifications in IPv6, unlike IPv4, where it
    was introduced later. IPv6 does not have a link-local broadcast facility;
    the same effect can be achieved by multicasting to the all-hosts group
    (FF02::1). Most environments, however, do not currently have their network
    infrastructures configured to route multicast: multicast on single subnet
    will work, but global multicast might not.

    - Link-local addresses

    IPv6 interfaces have link-local addresses in addition to the global
    addresses that applications usually use. These link-local addresses are
    always present and never change, which simplifies the design of
    configuration and routing protocols.

    - Jumbograms

    In IPv4, packets are limited to 64 KiB of payload. When used between capable
    communication partners and on communication links with a maximum
    transmission unit (MTU) larger than 65,576 octets (65536 + 40 for the
    header), IPv6 has optional support for packets over this limit, referred to
    as jumbograms which can be as large as 4 GiB. The use of jumbograms may
    improve performance over high-MTU networks.

    - IPsec

    IPsec, the protocol for IP network-layer encryption and authentication, is
    an integral part of the base protocol suite in IPv6; this is unlike IPv4,
    where it is optional (but usually implemented). IPsec, however, is not
    widely deployed except for securing traffic between IPv6 Border Gateway
    Protocol routers.

    - Mobility

    Unlike mobile IPv4, Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) avoids triangular routing and is
    therefore as efficient as normal IPv6. This advantage is mostly
    hypothetical, as neither MIP nor MIPv6 are widely deployed today.

    - Lack of a checksum
    IPv4 has a checksum field that uses all the bits of the header to create and
    check. Since certain fields (such as the TTL field) could or would change
    between each router, the checksum has to be recomputed in every router. It
    is believed that errors are very rare in today's network. For this reason,
    IPv6 has no error checking in its protocol but instead relies on link layer
    protocols to perform error checking. In the event that the header is
    corrupted, the worst that can happen is that the packet is sent to the wrong
    host.




  8. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    In article <5cee938a-6741-434d-b8ea-30771b7ee980@d21g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
    Nagrik wrote:
    >On Dec 15, 4:12 pm, Justa Lurker wrote:
    >> SpreadTooThin wrote:
    >> > Can someone tell me what the difference are between IPV6 and V4?

    >>
    >> When is the homework or take home exam due ?

    >
    >You keep prowling all the email groups, you do not answer any
    >questions, you do not have
    >any knowledge of the subject, and the following is your standard
    >quotes.
    >
    >"> When is the homework or take home exam due ?"
    >
    >I found you posting the exact same words on many different groups.


    And you will find the exact same words posted by many others too.

    When someone posts an open ended question without describing what or
    where they've already tried researching it themselves what impression
    do you think that gives?

    --
    -- Rod --
    rodd(at)polylogics(dot)com

  9. Re: IPV6 VS IPV4

    On Dec 15, 5:30 pm, SpreadTooThin wrote:

    > Son I left school 25 years ago... Maybe you should show your elders
    > some respect.


    Perhaps you left a bit too soon.

    DS

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