Suggestions on a small business level router? - TCP-IP

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  1. Suggestions on a small business level router?

    Hey folks!
    We run a small publishing company and we have a static IP that is
    used for our network connection. We're not big, maybe 20 employees and
    we use a Linksys WRT54G router. We have recently noticed a speed issue
    in relation to using it. That is to say that after rebooting it we get
    much faster speeds. We have had problems with the firmware.

    What we need is a replacement for this and we are primarily code geeks
    not network people. We do have a CISCO 1700 router that is currently
    going unused but is that what we want to use or do we solve our needs
    by buying something else like a Belkin?

    Does anyone have a suggestion for a small business class router that
    we could buy and get up and running?

    Many thanks in advance.
    Julian


  2. Re: Suggestions on a small business level router?

    In article
    <6456019a-66da-413a-abc7-0cdbc63dfdab@s19g2000prg.googlegroups.com>,
    worldcyclist@gmail.com wrote:

    > Hey folks!
    > We run a small publishing company and we have a static IP that is
    > used for our network connection. We're not big, maybe 20 employees and
    > we use a Linksys WRT54G router. We have recently noticed a speed issue
    > in relation to using it. That is to say that after rebooting it we get
    > much faster speeds. We have had problems with the firmware.
    >
    > What we need is a replacement for this and we are primarily code geeks
    > not network people. We do have a CISCO 1700 router that is currently
    > going unused but is that what we want to use or do we solve our needs
    > by buying something else like a Belkin?
    >
    > Does anyone have a suggestion for a small business class router that
    > we could buy and get up and running?
    >
    > Many thanks in advance.
    > Julian


    I think it's likely that any Cisco-branded router will do better than
    most consumer routers. Consumer routers have generally been designed
    with low cost in mind. Cisco routers are targeted to the business
    market, and their low-end SOHO routers make use of much of the same
    technology as their high-end ISP routers. Performance is better and IOS
    includes lots more configuration capabilities.

    If you had to purchase the Cisco, you might have a dilemma deciding
    where the cost vs. performance tradeoff should be. But if you already
    have a Cisco 1700 available, I'd say go with it. The only problem I can
    see is that the configuration interface is based on Cisco's IOS CLI, not
    a nice web GUI like most home routers.

    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

  3. Re: Suggestions on a small business level router?

    On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 00:26:35 -0500, Barry Margolin wrote:

    > In article
    > <6456019a-66da-413a-abc7-0cdbc63dfdab@s19g2000prg.googlegroups.com>,
    > worldcyclist@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    >> Hey folks!
    >> We run a small publishing company and we have a static IP that is used
    >> for our network connection. We're not big, maybe 20 employees and we
    >> use a Linksys WRT54G router. We have recently noticed a speed issue in
    >> relation to using it. That is to say that after rebooting it we get
    >> much faster speeds. We have had problems with the firmware.
    >>
    >> What we need is a replacement for this and we are primarily code geeks
    >> not network people. We do have a CISCO 1700 router that is currently
    >> going unused but is that what we want to use or do we solve our needs
    >> by buying something else like a Belkin?
    >>
    >> Does anyone have a suggestion for a small business class router that
    >> we could buy and get up and running?
    >>
    >> Many thanks in advance.
    >> Julian

    >
    > I think it's likely that any Cisco-branded router will do better than
    > most consumer routers. Consumer routers have generally been designed
    > with low cost in mind. Cisco routers are targeted to the business
    > market, and their low-end SOHO routers make use of much of the same
    > technology as their high-end ISP routers. Performance is better and IOS
    > includes lots more configuration capabilities.
    >
    > If you had to purchase the Cisco, you might have a dilemma deciding
    > where the cost vs. performance tradeoff should be. But if you already
    > have a Cisco 1700 available, I'd say go with it. The only problem I can
    > see is that the configuration interface is based on Cisco's IOS CLI, not
    > a nice web GUI like most home routers.


    On the contrary, most home routers have much features built in. You can
    go for Cisco, but buy the IOS with the firewall features, or much will
    not work (starting with FTP). Also, be prepared to get someone to
    configure the Cisco, as configuring Ciscos is non trivial compared to the
    average home router,

    M4

  4. Re: Suggestions on a small business level router?

    On Tue, 11 Dec 2007 09:31:53 -0800, worldcyclist wrote:

    > Hey folks!
    > We run a small publishing company and we have a static IP that is used
    > for our network connection. We're not big, maybe 20 employees and we use
    > a Linksys WRT54G router. We have recently noticed a speed issue in
    > relation to using it. That is to say that after rebooting it we get much
    > faster speeds. We have had problems with the firmware.


    Try upgrading to OpenWRT. Never worked with it myself, but heard nothing
    than good about it. It may be more difficult to configure, but there is a
    lot of community support out there.

    HTH,
    M4

  5. Re: Suggestions on a small business level router?

    On 11 Dec, 18:31, worldcycl...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hey folks!
    > We run a small publishing company and we have a static IP that is
    > used for our network connection. We're not big, maybe 20 employees and
    > we use a Linksys WRT54G router. We have recently noticed a speed issue
    > in relation to using it. That is to say that after rebooting it we get
    > much faster speeds. We have had problems with the firmware.
    >
    > What we need is a replacement for this and we are primarily code geeks
    > not network people. We do have a CISCO 1700 router that is currently
    > going unused but is that what we want to use or do we solve our needs
    > by buying something else like a Belkin?
    >
    > Does anyone have a suggestion for a small business class router that
    > we could buy and get up and running?
    >
    > Many thanks in advance.
    > Julian



    This is an area where Opensource excels.
    Running FreeBSD ( or Open/net/some Linux ) on a commodity left-over PC
    using any of the available firewall-software can't be beaten in
    functionality. Add a decent configurator (s.a. smoothwall or a full-
    blown
    like fwbuilder) and you will get a world-class stateful firewall that
    does anything
    but cook your coffee.

    As for performance, a 100Mhz pentium will saturate a 100Mb NIC given
    a reasonably number of rules.

    The hard part is to find someone to build it for you.

  6. Re: Suggestions on a small business level router?

    On Dec 12, 12:04 am, Martijn Lievaart wrote:

    > Try upgrading to OpenWRT. Never worked with it myself, but heard nothing
    > than good about it. It may be more difficult to configure, but there is a
    > lot of community support out there.


    I have used it extensively and have nothing but good things to say
    about it. It "just works", and if you're familiar with Linux, is very
    easy to manage. No slick GUI, and learning its somewhat odd
    configuration table takes a few hours, but it's well worth it.

    Note that most routers that run OpenWRT don't have much CPU
    horsepower. However, it seems to be perfectly adequate for routing and
    NAT at a few megabits per second. You probably don't want the router
    NATing purely local traffic though.

    OpenWRT gives you full control over the switch that's built into these
    routers. You can easily configure multiple networks (to make a DMZ,
    for example) and even present them as tagged VLANs.

    I have had lots of problems that require a reboot with factory
    firmware on Linksys and Netgear routers. I have had *none* with
    OpenWRT.

    Many other people say similar things about other open firmware
    projects and you're likely to be pretty happy with any of the well-
    known ones.

    DS

  7. Re: Suggestions on a small business level router?

    On Wed, 19 Dec 2007 10:19:02 -0800, phn wrote:

    > On 11 Dec, 18:31, worldcycl...@gmail.com wrote:
    >> Hey folks!
    >> We run a small publishing company and we have a static IP that is used
    >> for our network connection. We're not big, maybe 20 employees and we
    >> use a Linksys WRT54G router. We have recently noticed a speed issue in
    >> relation to using it. That is to say that after rebooting it we get
    >> much faster speeds. We have had problems with the firmware.
    >>
    >> What we need is a replacement for this and we are primarily code geeks
    >> not network people. We do have a CISCO 1700 router that is currently
    >> going unused but is that what we want to use or do we solve our needs
    >> by buying something else like a Belkin?
    >>
    >> Does anyone have a suggestion for a small business class router that
    >> we could buy and get up and running?
    >>
    >> Many thanks in advance.
    >> Julian

    >
    >
    > This is an area where Opensource excels. Running FreeBSD ( or
    > Open/net/some Linux ) on a commodity left-over PC using any of the
    > available firewall-software can't be beaten in functionality. Add a
    > decent configurator (s.a. smoothwall or a full- blown
    > like fwbuilder) and you will get a world-class stateful firewall that
    > does anything
    > but cook your coffee.
    >
    > As for performance, a 100Mhz pentium will saturate a 100Mb NIC given a
    > reasonably number of rules.
    >
    > The hard part is to find someone to build it for you.


    Ah, but they already have the hardware, and building it is easy. Just
    upgrade to OpenWRT. :-) It's a Linux based distro for Linksys WRT54. It
    does not run on all WRT models, so be sure to check first.

    And yes, this (OpenSource) rocks functionality wise. And is much easier
    to configure than a C1700. Which probably will not be able to do
    everything you want anyway.

    M4

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