new hardware - Suse

This is a discussion on new hardware - Suse ; Im about to install a new motherboard and CPU. Ok last time I did this was good old suse ver 9. Ended having to do a full install.. reallt irratating because I had just got all my programs running well ...

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Thread: new hardware

  1. new hardware

    Im about to install a new motherboard and CPU. Ok last time I did this was
    good old suse ver 9. Ended having to do a full install.. reallt irratating
    because I had just got all my programs running well in the os. Now running
    suse 10.3..is there an easy way to preform the upgrade without having to do
    a full re install?

    ty bob



  2. Re: new hardware

    bob wrote:

    > is there an easy way to preform the upgrade without having to do
    > a full re install?


    IMO, NO
    You can do this but's there's no guaranty
    just backup you're /home or mouting you're home to the new install
    And make a list of the programs you have

    Backing up you're running /home:
    tar -czf /place/of/backup/home.tar ~/

    do a fresh install with a partition for:
    /swap
    / for root
    /home for user settings
    /.... other you want
    --
    EOS
    www.photo-memories.be
    Running KDE 3.5.10 / openSUSE 11.0

  3. Re: new hardware

    bob wrote:
    > Im about to install a new motherboard and CPU. Ok last time I did this was
    > good old suse ver 9. Ended having to do a full install.. reallt irratating
    > because I had just got all my programs running well in the os. Now running
    > suse 10.3..is there an easy way to preform the upgrade without having to do
    > a full re install?


    yes, buy the new botherboard with the same specifications like the old
    one.

    Much will depend on a LOT of things. Basicaly it will depend on the
    motherboard (e.g. video and sound card, lan, 32 or 64 bits, ...) and on
    you knowledge to solve problems as they show up.

    I have known people who were able to swap the mobo and just went on
    working. I have known people who lost all their data.

    houghi
    --
    Personally, I think most sports fans are a little "gay". They'd
    rather watch a bunch of sweaty guys jumping all over eachother,
    than, say fashion TV - where hot models walk down the runway.

  4. Re: new hardware

    On Sun, 9 Nov 2008, bob wrote:-

    >Im about to install a new motherboard and CPU. Ok last time I did this was
    >good old suse ver 9. Ended having to do a full install.. reallt irratating
    >because I had just got all my programs running well in the os. Now running
    >suse 10.3..is there an easy way to preform the upgrade without having to do
    >a full re install?


    I recently had to change motherboard and CPU on one of my systems. It
    had an old AMD Athlon XP processor and was replaced by an AMD X2. As I
    expected, it didn't work straight away as a drop-in replacement as the
    IDE controllers modules weren't in the initrd and so the system failed
    to boot. I couldn't use the repair system as that was broken and, while
    I could have used the rescue console to identify the new modules I
    needed and built them into the initrd, an installation would have been
    much easier.

    It was at this point I had to decide on whether to do an upgrade
    installation, which would have the system back up and running in a
    matter of minutes, but also keep it as a 32bit system, or do a fresh
    install thereby letting me install a 64bit system. In the end, I opted
    for an upgrade installation. I ensured all the repos I'd been using
    prior to the change were enabled for the upgrade and then changed the
    update options. By changing from "update based on patterns" to "only
    update installed packages" I was able to ensure virtually no changes to
    the software. If there are any changes, you can check what they're going
    to be by selecting Packages and then changing the filter to
    "Installation Summary"

    Finally, I told it to go ahead and start the "upgrade" and, a few
    minutes later, the system rebooted with the correct controller modules.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    Team Acorn: http://www.distributed.net/ OGR-NG @ ~100Mnodes RC5-72 @ ~1Mkeys/s
    SUSE 10.1 32 | | openSUSE 10.3 32b | openSUSE 11.0 32b
    | openSUSE 10.2 64b | openSUSE 10.3 64b | openSUSE 11.0 64b
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC | RISC OS 3.11

  5. Re: new hardware

    On 2008-11-10 07:42, EOS wrote:
    >
    > Backing up you're running /home:
    > tar -czf /place/of/backup/home.tar ~/
    >
    > do a fresh install with a partition for:
    > /swap
    > / for root
    > /home for user settings
    > /.... other you want


    Your example of backing up /home sucks :-)

    Eg. if the reader know so much so they understand it,
    they can do it better and backup all homes.
    And they who don't understand will run this as root and only
    have backup of /root .


    My advice for the upgrade is a new install, but first
    make sure /home is a separate partition, which was default even in suse9x

    Copy /etc to /home/etc/
    # rsync -avH /etc /home

    Download the system rescue cd , follow the links from http://partimage.org
    Boot it and make a backup of all partitions one by one to a big usb disk or
    a network share.

    Now just make a new install, leaving /home as it is and the install will find
    /home/etc and yast can import the user settings from it. (passwords and groups)

    If it goes wrong you can recover it with partimage and try again.

    /bb

  6. Re: new hardware

    bb wrote:

    > Your example of backing up /home sucks :-)
    >
    > Eg. if the reader know so much so they understand it,
    > they can do it better and backup all homes.
    > And they who don't understand will run this as root and only
    > have backup of /root .



    there was a line that say's:
    "Backing up you're running /home:"
    ............................................ ;-)
    --
    EOS
    www.photo-memories.be
    Running KDE 3.5.10 / openSUSE 11.0

  7. Re: new hardware

    bb wrote:
    > My advice for the upgrade is a new install, but first
    > make sure /home is a separate partition, which was default even in suse9x


    Default started with 10.0. The orginal request was done:
    Sat, 27 Aug 2005 05:01:25 +0200
    Formulated as:
    Is there a reason that /home is not on its own partition anymore by
    default?
    The advatage of having it on its own are that when you do a new
    instalation, you can easily keep your own data.

    After that an interesting discussion started between the pro's and the
    con's. After that it was requested what the size and/or algorithm should
    be to put into YaST and the only proposal was:

    The reasoning followed is that it is better to have a bit larger /. If
    needed you can add a directory in / and a symlink in ~/
    1. No seperation when the HD is smaller then 30 GB
    2. A minimum of 10 GB for /
    3. A maximmum of 20 GB for /
    4. /home to / should be 2:1
    Examples
    Total / /home
    20GB 20GB --
    25GB 25GB --
    30GB 30GB --
    40GB 13GB 27GB
    60GB 20GB 40GB
    120GB 20GB 100GB

    I believe the algorithm has changed a bit, but not that much. I think
    the minimum has changed or is removed completely. Not sure, because
    besides beta-testing the algorithm itself I never use(d) it.

    The person who asked for it should get 2.7 gazillion dollars/euros and
    the person who proposed the parameters should get oodles of it.

    houghi
    --
    You can have my keyboard ...
    if you can pry it from my dead, cold, stiff fingers

  8. Re: new hardware

    bob wrote:
    > Im about to install a new motherboard and CPU. Ok last time I did this was
    > good old suse ver 9. Ended having to do a full install.. reallt irratating
    > because I had just got all my programs running well in the os. Now running
    > suse 10.3..is there an easy way to preform the upgrade without having to do
    > a full re install?
    >
    > ty bob
    >
    >


    You don't really expect to boot up your current configuration on a new
    and different chip set do you? A clean install is the best way to get
    into new hardware.

    --
    Claude Hopper

    ? ?

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