fsck gui - Suse

This is a discussion on fsck gui - Suse ; Hello, Anyone know if there is a fsck GUI for X? Specifically for openSUSE 10.3 or higher? Today I had/wanted to fsck my encrypted partition. I googled and found the answer on an Ubuntu forum: scroll to the last post: ...

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Thread: fsck gui

  1. fsck gui

    Hello,

    Anyone know if there is a fsck GUI for X? Specifically for openSUSE 10.3 or
    higher?

    Today I had/wanted to fsck my encrypted partition. I googled and found the
    answer on an Ubuntu forum: scroll to the last post:


    I had to do some console kung-fu which really wasn't all that terribly
    difficult.

    But this has me wondering if there is some kind of GUI app that can run in X
    to scan a partition (encrypted or otherwise). I know that changes
    cannot/should not be made to mounted partitions, but surely, it can do a
    read only scan (i.e. fsck -n). If errors are found, the filesystem could be
    marked dirty and the user told to *shutter* reboot?

    Or perhaps an ncurses fsck tool that can be selected in a grub menu?

    Anyone know if anything like these exist?

    --
    Chris

  2. Re: fsck gui

    Chris wrote:
    > I had to do some console kung-fu which really wasn't all that terribly
    > difficult.


    That is basicaly the reason most likely there is no GUI for it as a
    standard. Takes too much time to make and too little use for it.

    The reason I would not use it is because most often you need to umount
    the HD that you would be using with GUI. That would mean at least
    logging out as user (logging out ALL users) and log in as root. Also on
    a multi-user system you would need to make it unpossible for users to
    log in again. This means init 1.

    > But this has me wondering if there is some kind of GUI app that can run in X
    > to scan a partition (encrypted or otherwise). I know that changes
    > cannot/should not be made to mounted partitions, but surely, it can do a
    > read only scan (i.e. fsck -n). If errors are found, the filesystem could be
    > marked dirty and the user told to *shutter* reboot?


    Reboot is only needed if it is something on / and I would not want to
    repair something there when under GUI. What if the GUI is the cause of
    the problem? On a single user system I can go to init 1, log in as root,
    umount the partition, do the `fsck -y /dev/sdX`, `mount -a` and `init 5
    && exit` (OK, most of the times I just reboot)

    That way I am sure that not some application writes or tries to write to
    the partition.

    > Or perhaps an ncurses fsck tool that can be selected in a grub menu?
    >
    > Anyone know if anything like these exist?


    No idea. The times I used it I went into single user from boot and solve
    issues from there. Even ncurses might be using things that cause the
    problems.

    I understand that there is a difference wether you are the only user or
    not. What you always must be thinking about is that whatever you do must
    be usable if there are 100 users and 10 different servers (web, mail,
    proxy, file, ..) running on the system. Just because I do not, I
    understand that many of them do and the number 100 is to make clear that
    it is not just a family, but it is a system in a network enviroment.

    houghi
    --
    Listen do you hear them drawing near in their search for the sinners?
    Feeding on the power of our fear and the evil within us.
    Incarnation of Satan's creation of all that we dread.
    When the demons arrive those alive would be better off dead!

  3. Re: fsck gui

    Chris wrote:
    > But this has me wondering if there is some kind of GUI app that can run in X
    > to scan a partition (encrypted or otherwise). I know that changes
    > cannot/should not be made to mounted partitions, but surely, it can do a


    Not by OTHER programs either, the "partition to be checked" needs
    to be doing completely NOTHING at all dureing the check
    (except the root partition, but that is normally checked direct
    after a reboot in read-only mode).

    And fsck needs reads access to the "raw disk special file" to be able
    to read bitmaps and i-node tables, which normally is reserved to the
    root userID (or a member of the "disk" group).

    > If errors are found, the filesystem could be
    > marked dirty and the user told to *shutter* reboot?


    And how would you mark it "dirty" without write access?

    PS: the same goes for "tune2fs" etc. - you normally only run those
    in runlevel 1 and an (almost) idle system.
    --
    ************************************************** *****************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. SSC/ICT **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** *****************

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