Slow - Suse

This is a discussion on Slow - Suse ; I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Slow

  1. Slow

    I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I
    think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within
    a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece of
    software or just what. Any ideas from anyone what I should
    check....booting Windows does not seem to this so it seems something
    within Linux is causing this. I tend to use just Firefox, thunderbird,
    aMSN, and sometimes mencoder from a command line.
    Thanks for any suggestions.
    David A.

  2. Re: Slow

    David Anderson wrote:

    > I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I
    > think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within
    > a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece of
    > software or just what. Any ideas from anyone what I should
    > check....booting Windows does not seem to this so it seems something
    > within Linux is causing this. I tend to use just Firefox, thunderbird,
    > aMSN, and sometimes mencoder from a command line.
    > Thanks for any suggestions.
    > David A.


    As usual top from a terminal window will show you what's eating CPU.
    - or in KDE System Guard

    Alan

    --
    email =~ s/nospam/fudokai/

  3. Re: Slow

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 12:39:26 +0000, ajp wrote:

    > As usual top from a terminal window will show you what's eating CPU.
    > - or in KDE System Guard


    Sound advice.

    And is not beagle indexing the usual culprit for this type of behavior
    of slowing the machine to a crawl because of its high, but obviously
    necessary, disk access, and which will be most noticeable on single disk
    machines?

  4. Re: Slow

    David Anderson wrote:
    > I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I
    > think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within
    > a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece of
    > software or just what. Any ideas from anyone what I should
    > check....booting Windows does not seem to this so it seems something
    > within Linux is causing this. I tend to use just Firefox, thunderbird,
    > aMSN, and sometimes mencoder from a command line.
    > Thanks for any suggestions.
    > David A.


    my guess is that it is probably caused by both Beagle (that doopy looking doggie
    in the 'system tray') and the SUSE Updater (that doopy looking green pulsating
    globe also in the 'system tray') BOTH trying to HOG each other out and be the
    most important thing in the universe..

    Alan is right: use top and i bet you see things like

    beagle-helper
    beagled
    kerry
    opensuseupdate

    most folks either disable or uninstall beagle...you disable easily by right
    clicking on the goofy doggie icon and select quit, then answer 'don't start' to
    its question...

    the updater, i don't know...i like it and use it...and just plan to be hogged
    out the first 15 minutes or so after every boot..

    all that said: if your machine slows and NEVER speeds back up....then that is a
    different problem...

    which you should be able to spot with top, or try atop
    which is a top on steroids....tracking
    network activity (and other stuff) also..

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  5. Re: Slow

    DenverD wrote:
    > the updater, i don't know...i like it and use it...and just plan to be hogged
    > out the first 15 minutes or so after every boot..


    If your machine is almost always on, you do not realy need it. Just set
    the automatic update to do it when you are away.
    If your system is on most of the time, you do not realy need it. Just
    set the automatic update to do it when you are most likely working on
    the system.
    If your system is off and on at different moments, use the updater.

    At least that is how I would do it.

    houghi
    --
    Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done,
    and why. Then do it.
    -- Heinlein : Time Enough For Love

  6. Re: Slow

    David Anderson wrote:
    > I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I
    > think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within
    > a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece of
    > software or just what. Any ideas from anyone what I should
    > check....booting Windows does not seem to this so it seems something
    > within Linux is causing this.



    Run top, sort by memory use, and watch for prepare_preload. It's been
    causing me problems for a week or so. It consumes large amounts of
    virtual memory, so much so that it brings a 45GB system to its knees.
    Kill it if it turns out to be the culprit. I have yet to determine the
    nature of the problem.

  7. Re: Slow

    Gary Gapinski wrote:
    > virtual memory, so much so that it brings a 45GB system to its knees.

    Sorry, typo, should be 4GB---------------------^

  8. Re: Slow

    houghi schreef:
    ....
    > If your machine is almost always on, you do not realy need it. Just set
    > the automatic update to do it when you are away.


    > If your system is on most of the time, you do not realy need it. Just
    > set the automatic update to do it when you are most likely working on
    > the system.


    This maybe has nothing to do with the previous post, but I need some
    explanation for this post. What's the difference between the first
    statement and the second one? Is machine is not the same as system? By
    machine, you mean the pc, I assume and system would be the os. But, if
    that true, then when the update should be running? When the OP afk or not?

    I've read your post three times but I still can't understand what you
    mean. From my understanding, you advising the OP to run the update when
    he's away AND also when he's working on his pc. Or I'm wrong?

  9. Re: Slow

    Canned wrote:
    > houghi schreef:
    > ...
    >> If your machine is almost always on, you do not realy need it. Just set
    >> the automatic update to do it when you are away.

    >
    >> If your system is on most of the time, you do not realy need it. Just
    >> set the automatic update to do it when you are most likely working on
    >> the system.

    >
    > This maybe has nothing to do with the previous post, but I need some
    > explanation for this post. What's the difference between the first
    > statement and the second one?


    Always on is your system runs 24/7. You set the update at e.h. 04:49
    Most of the time, you use it during working hours and you set the update
    time at 10:49

    > Is machine is not the same as system? By
    > machine, you mean the pc, I assume and system would be the os. But, if
    > that true, then when the update should be running? When the OP afk or not?


    Machine, system, box. All the same thing.

    > I've read your post three times but I still can't understand what you
    > mean. From my understanding, you advising the OP to run the update when
    > he's away AND also when he's working on his pc. Or I'm wrong?


    No. It just depends on wether his machine is on or not. Away when his
    machine is always on. If he is there if his system is not always on.

    e.g. if your machine is not always on and more specfic if your machine
    is oly on during office hours, how will you do the update outside of
    office hours when it is off?

    houghi
    --
    Remind me to write an article on the compulsive reading of news. The
    theme will be that most neuroses can be traced to the unhealthy habit
    of wallowing in the troubles of five billion strangers. -- Heinlein

  10. Re: Slow

    David Anderson wrote:

    > I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I
    > think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within
    > a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece of
    > software or just what. Any ideas from anyone what I should
    > check....booting Windows does not seem to this so it seems something
    > within Linux is causing this. I tend to use just Firefox, thunderbird,
    > aMSN, and sometimes mencoder from a command line.
    > Thanks for any suggestions.
    > David


    what happens when you login as root? and what are the specs of you computer?

  11. Re: Slow

    houghi wrote:
    > DenverD wrote:
    >> the updater, i don't know...i like it and use it...and just plan to be hogged
    >> out the first 15 minutes or so after every boot..

    >
    > If your machine is almost always on,


    David (the thread starting poster) specified "my system slows to a crawl within
    a few minutes from bootup"

    since i also boot my machine (once a year or once an hour makes no difference)
    and see that the updater is busy for a while after, i thought it might be part
    of the David's problem...and worth a mention.....then HE can decide to also
    remove updater, or not...(i decided to not)

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  12. Re: Slow

    > what happens when you login as root? and what are the specs of you computer?

    NEVER log into a gui (KDE, Gnome, etc) as root....NEVER EVER!!

    always log in as a user and then become root as needed..

    why? see: http://texan.dk/temp/SUSEsignInROOT.html

    --
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  13. Re: Slow

    DenverD wrote:
    >
    >
    > houghi wrote:
    >> DenverD wrote:
    >>> the updater, i don't know...i like it and use it...and just plan to be hogged
    >>> out the first 15 minutes or so after every boot..

    >>
    >> If your machine is almost always on,

    >
    > David (the thread starting poster) specified "my system slows to a crawl within
    > a few minutes from bootup"


    I know, I read it as well.

    > since i also boot my machine (once a year or once an hour makes no difference)
    > and see that the updater is busy for a while after, i thought it might be part
    > of the David's problem


    Could be.

    > ...and worth a mention.....


    Obviously. Otherwise you wouldn't have mentioned it.

    > then HE can decide to also
    > remove updater, or not...(i decided to not)


    Great. I said almost the same thing using different words.


    houghi
    --
    Remind me to write an article on the compulsive reading of news. The
    theme will be that most neuroses can be traced to the unhealthy habit
    of wallowing in the troubles of five billion strangers. -- Heinlein

  14. Re: Slow

    Thanks to all those who have replied. Well it appears my culprit is
    kTorrent..?..?

    It has been loading itself up automatically and residing in the
    tray...never really expected any issues...its not even transferring any
    files.
    Heres the output from TOP for this particular app at the time I
    terminated it.

    3916 david 20 0 523m 384m 2444 R 90.9 76.3 54:59.84 ktorrent

    It held upwards of 95% at any given time of the CPU. When I first got
    TOP loaded it had aropund 10% on the memory and just kept slowly
    climbing to the 76.3% you see when I stopped it. Around the time it got
    to about 45% or so of MEM I could start to feel the sluggishness set in.
    And again it wasn't actually moving any data...weird....

    I wonder if removing and reinstalling would fix that? or if I'll just
    have to find a different torrent client?


    David



    > I have SuSE 11.0 installed at present...have used it since ver 7.0 I
    > think. Suddenly in just the last week my system slows to a crawl within
    > a few minutes from bootup. I'm not sure whether its from a piece of
    > software or just what. Any ideas from anyone what I should
    > check....booting Windows does not seem to this so it seems something
    > within Linux is causing this. I tend to use just Firefox, thunderbird,
    > aMSN, and sometimes mencoder from a command line.
    > Thanks for any suggestions.
    > David A.


  15. Re: Slow

    On 2008-10-29, David Anderson wrote:
    > Thanks to all those who have replied. Well it appears my culprit is
    > kTorrent..?..?
    >
    > It has been loading itself up automatically and residing in the
    > tray...never really expected any issues...its not even transferring any
    > files.
    > Heres the output from TOP for this particular app at the time I
    > terminated it.
    >
    > 3916 david 20 0 523m 384m 2444 R 90.9 76.3 54:59.84 ktorrent
    >
    > It held upwards of 95% at any given time of the CPU. When I first got
    > TOP loaded it had aropund 10% on the memory and just kept slowly
    > climbing to the 76.3% you see when I stopped it. Around the time it got
    > to about 45% or so of MEM I could start to feel the sluggishness set in.
    > And again it wasn't actually moving any data...weird....
    >
    > I wonder if removing and reinstalling would fix that? or if I'll just
    > have to find a different torrent client?


    I also had this problem with ktorrent all of a sudden. Enormous CPU load.
    I posted about it a while ago.

    It was a bug in it, something to do with an infinite loop in
    DNS-something.

    It's OK now, it got updated.
    My CPU load is 2%, four torrents running.

    Oh, I'm running the one from Packman, version 3.1.4


    --
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "There will come a time when every evil
    That we know will be an evil...
    That we can rise above" - Frank Zappa

  16. Re: Slow

    DenverD <"spam.trap\\REMOVE \"at\" SOME\\texan.dk"> wrote:

    >> what happens when you login as root? and what are the specs of you
    >> computer?

    >
    > NEVER log into a gui (KDE, Gnome, etc) as root....NEVER EVER!!
    >
    > always log in as a user and then become root as needed..
    >
    > why? see: http://texan.dk/temp/SUSEsignInROOT.html
    >


    Been using suse since 7.3 and never had a problem with it while in root
    i don't connect to internet, i just do what i have to do then leave. the
    root gui is there for a reason.

    when i have a problem it's easier to fix a problem from there.

    since 10.2 i found an other way to do what i want

    system -> file manager -> file manager super user root

    but in the case of david anderson it would be the easiest solution to his
    problem

  17. Re: Slow

    darklight wrote:
    > Been using suse since 7.3 and never had a problem with it while in root
    > i don't connect to internet, i just do what i have to do then leave. the
    > root gui is there for a reason.


    So because YOU did not have any problems, nobody else will? I have seen
    very experienced administrators do stupid things when logged in as root
    The root GUI is there for two reasons:
    1) To check wether it is a problem with X or not. e.g. a user is unable
    to log in and root is, then it isn't a X problem. This comes in handy if
    you are the only user.
    2) So that people do not bugger the developers and helpdesk to compain
    why it is turned off.

    > when i have a problem it's easier to fix a problem from there.


    No it isn't. It is as easy to do it from anywhere. In fact it is often
    more difficult to log out, loose all that you have, log in as root, do
    work there, log out, log in as user, see it did not work, log out, log
    in again ...

    Now I just run those tools as root that I need as root and have all my
    others things running as a normal user. If you do a LOT of things as
    root (I do and I break a lot as well, but it is a hobby) then you could
    edit sudoers, so you don't need to enter the passport every time.

    I have that for only a few commands, because I also LIKE to typr the
    password, because it makes me contious of the fact that I enter a
    different mode. More so then the wallpaper (that you moght not see when
    you run a program fullscreen) or the red in a terminal (Great idea
    BTW.What genious cam up with that to finaly put it in openSUSE)

    > since 10.2 i found an other way to do what i want
    >
    > system -> file manager -> file manager super user root


    Something like that has existed in every version. I have ran file
    managers as root since the first version. But then I never ran KDE or
    GNOME or use a menu that I did not made myself.

    > but in the case of david anderson it would be the easiest solution to his
    > problem


    In the short term perhaps, in the long run he learns the wrong way to do
    things and will stick to it. Unlearning them will take a long time. It
    took you from 7.3 to 10.2 to unlearn it and it still isn't completely
    gone.

    The easiest way is not always the right way and the right way becomes
    the easiest once you know how to.
    `sudo - -c /sbin/yast2` or use any other command.
    There also is `kdesu` and `gnomesu` and some others to use and you can
    make links anywere you desire.

    houghi
    --
    If you owe the bank $100 that's your problem.
    If you owe the bank $100 million, that's the bank's problem.
    If you owe the bank $700 billion, it becomes your problem again.

+ Reply to Thread