How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist - Suse

This is a discussion on How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist - Suse ; Hi, I saw something that said to edit the blacklist I should type the following: sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist I started a thread about the gedit and how it wasn't working and somebody said that is because gedit is not a ...

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Thread: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

  1. How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    Hi,

    I saw something that said to edit the blacklist I should type the
    following:

    sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    I started a thread about the gedit and how it wasn't working and
    somebody said that is because gedit is not a user on my system. Which
    is all well and dandy but I still don't know the command to edit a
    text file via the command prompt.

    When I was using ubuntu I would type something like 'sudo nano /etc/
    network/interfaces'. This is different though..

  2. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    On Oct 17, 8:42*pm, nouveauricheinvestme...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I saw something that said to edit the blacklist I should type the
    > following:
    >
    > sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
    >
    > I started a thread about the gedit and how it wasn't working and
    > somebody said that is because gedit is not a user on my system. *Which
    > is all well and dandy but I still don't know the command to edit a
    > text file via the command prompt.
    >
    > When I was using ubuntu I would type something like 'sudo nano /etc/
    > network/interfaces'. *This is different though..


    I want to put 'ssb' on there because I can't seem to find it anywhere
    but it is listed as the alternate driver when I type ndiswrapper -l.


  3. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    nouveauricheinvestments@gmail.com wrote:
    > On Oct 17, 8:42 pm, nouveauricheinvestme...@gmail.com wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I saw something that said to edit the blacklist I should type the
    >> following:
    >>
    >> sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
    >>
    >> I started a thread about the gedit and how it wasn't working and
    >> somebody said that is because gedit is not a user on my system. Which
    >> is all well and dandy but I still don't know the command to edit a
    >> text file via the command prompt.
    >>
    >> When I was using ubuntu I would type something like 'sudo nano /etc/
    >> network/interfaces'. This is different though..

    >
    > I want to put 'ssb' on there because I can't seem to find it anywhere
    > but it is listed as the alternate driver when I type ndiswrapper -l.
    >


    no, you other thread was NOT about gedit and how it wasn't working--it was
    instead "Is it right that what i type answers 'user gedit does not exist'?

    and the correct answer was given by two--the answer being you are typing the
    WRONG thing, and getting a correct answer:

    you were *not* typing sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
    instead you were typing su gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    see the difference?

    now your question is "How do i edit a particular text file as root?"

    many ways--i ASSUME from your question that want to do it in a graphical
    environment using gedit, try this:

    - press and hold the Alt button, and then press F2
    - in the blank that pops up type: gnomesu gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
    - enter your root password when prompted
    - gedit should open the blacklist file for your changes
    - make a backup copy of the original, make & save your changes to the original,
    and exit gedit
    - done

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  4. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    nouveauricheinvestments@gmail.com wrote:
    > I started a thread about the gedit and how it wasn't working and
    > somebody said that is because gedit is not a user on my system. Which
    > is all well and dandy but I still don't know the command to edit a
    > text file via the command prompt.


    houghi@pasta : sudo gedit
    root's password:
    cannot open display:

    So apparently you want to edit in a GUI, not in CLI.
    So do the following:

    `su -`
    `gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist`

    The reason for this is that Ubuntu has deactivated the standard ability
    to become root as done by any other Linux distribution.


    houghi
    --
    Nutze die Zeit. Sie ist das Kostbarste, was wir haben, denn
    es ist unwiederbringliche Lebenszeit. Leben ist aber mehr
    als Werk und Arbeit, und das Sein wichtiger als das Tun.
    - Johannes Muller-Elmau

  5. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    DenverD wrote:
    > - press and hold the Alt button, and then press F2
    > - in the blank that pops up type: gnomesu gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist


    This might not work if the user does not have GNOME installed, but KDE,
    then you need `kdesu`. In the unlikely situation he has neither, then
    that wont work.

    That is the reason that I use `su -` and then `gedit
    /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist`, because that _should_ work everywhere.

    houghi
    --
    Nutze die Zeit. Sie ist das Kostbarste, was wir haben, denn
    es ist unwiederbringliche Lebenszeit. Leben ist aber mehr
    als Werk und Arbeit, und das Sein wichtiger als das Tun.
    - Johannes Muller-Elmau

  6. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    houghi wrote:
    > DenverD wrote:
    >> - press and hold the Alt button, and then press F2
    >> - in the blank that pops up type: gnomesu gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    >
    > This might not work if the user does not have GNOME installed, but KDE,
    > then you need `kdesu`. In the unlikely situation he has neither, then
    > that wont work.
    >
    > That is the reason that I use `su -` and then `gedit
    > /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist`, because that _should_ work everywhere.



    all good points...and, i realize i may have missed the center of his target
    because (i've never used gedit) and ASSuMEd it was Gedit for Gnome like Kwrite
    for KDE...which is why i gave Gnome-like directions (as best i could since i've
    not used Gnome for most of two years..

    personally, to root edit i usually use mc in a root term, or kedsu kwrite, or su
    - the kate, or sudo emacs or or or or..

    did i mention or?

    --
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  7. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    DenverD wrote:
    > all good points...and, i realize i may have missed the center of his target
    > because (i've never used gedit) and ASSuMEd it was Gedit for Gnome like Kwrite
    > for KDE...which is why i gave Gnome-like directions (as best i could since i've
    > not used Gnome for most of two years..


    Good point. Never thought of that. I stopped thinking that things with a
    K are KDE and G are Gnome since I wanted to use knews and didn't
    understand what people liked about the KDE layout so much.

    > personally, to root edit i usually use mc in a root term, or kedsu kwrite, or su
    > - the kate, or sudo emacs or or or or..


    I only use vim or gvim. The reason is that where I worked, we used vi
    (the real one) and thus already was a bit used to it. That made me also
    change from pine to mutt, because I was not able to change the editor
    from pico to vim in pine and I could not get used to pico.

    The amount of emails I send with ZZ at the end is pretty high.

    houghi
    --
    This was written under the influence of the following:
    | Artist : De Dijk
    | Song : Hou me vast
    | Album : Zullen We Dansen

  8. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    houghi wrote in
    news:slrngfj950.cob.houghi@pasta.houghi:

    > nouveauricheinvestments@gmail.com wrote:
    >> I started a thread about the gedit and how it wasn't working and
    >> somebody said that is because gedit is not a user on my system.
    >> Which is all well and dandy but I still don't know the command to
    >> edit a text file via the command prompt.

    >
    > houghi@pasta : sudo gedit
    > root's password:
    > cannot open display:
    >
    > So apparently you want to edit in a GUI, not in CLI.
    > So do the following:
    >
    > `su -`
    > `gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist`
    >
    > The reason for this is that Ubuntu has deactivated the standard
    > ability to become root as done by any other Linux distribution.
    >


    In ubuntu v8.04:

    sudo gedit /path/filename in terminal session should work as is.

  9. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    propman wrote:
    > In ubuntu v8.04:
    >
    > sudo gedit /path/filename in terminal session should work as is.


    FYI: This is an openSUSE newsgroup.

    houghi
    --
    This was written under the influence of the following:
    | Artist : Astor Piazzolla
    | Song : Contrabajissimo
    | Album : Zero Hour

  10. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist


    > I only use vim or gvim. The reason is that where I worked, we used vi
    > (the real one)


    every time i ACCIDENTALLY get into vi i get STUCK...can NOT figure out how to do
    anything, not even EXIT....and often (in panic) beat my computer into submission
    with a 10 pound hammer!!

    it is a LOT less expensive to just use a more modern *user friendly* editor that
    i understand, kinda ;-)

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  11. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    DenverD wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >> I only use vim or gvim. The reason is that where I worked, we used vi
    >> (the real one)

    >
    > every time i ACCIDENTALLY get into vi i get STUCK...can NOT figure out how to do
    > anything, not even EXIT....and often (in panic) beat my computer into submission
    > with a 10 pound hammer!!


    I had that the first weeks as well. I have people seen cursing at vi
    (which is harder to use then vim) and they were blessed when they send
    their first email with :wq or :ZZ at the end.

    The three most importand things I needed to learn when I started:
    When you open it, you need to inster text. You do that by typing the
    letter i.

    Asume you wrote someting and want to be sure you DO NOT
    want to write it use the following
    :q!
    to get into the mode where you do not enter text
    : to tell there is a command coming
    q which is the quit mode
    ! so it does not ask for permission to quit without writing anything.

    If you DO want to write it: `:wq` (write quit)

    What I also do is copy /usr/share/doc/packages/vim/vimrc_example1 to
    ~/.vimrc (OK, I now use something different)

    Once you have the first three commands above, the rest will follow.

    > it is a LOT less expensive to just use a more modern *user friendly* editor that
    > i understand, kinda ;-)


    Depends on what you want and need. To each his own. You can use gvim for
    GUI instead of vim for CLI. Start with `vimtutor`. Also there are plenty
    of pages like http://www.selectorweb.com/vi.html and
    http://www.linux.ie/articles/tutoria...0.refcard.html
    vim (and aparently also Emacs, no experience there) are very powerfull
    and do a bit more then just edit text.

    They are also made with CLI in mind. CLI is very often still used when
    system administrators ssh to a remote machine. I found none as easy to
    use for scripting. Especialy the folding is done much better then
    anything I have seen so far.
    http://houghi.org/shots/slides/vim002.php for an example of folding. I
    do it a bit different now. I just place #{{{ and #}}} anywhere I desire.

    The great thing however is that there is choice. You run what you want
    and I run what I want depending on the person and the task. If you
    change one line in a file every month or so, then vim is not for you. If
    you use it on a daily basis, then it might be that you want something
    more then a standard editor and then vim is an option.

    houghi
    --
    > Knock-knock.
    > Who's there?
    > Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.


  12. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    houghi wrote:
    > DenverD wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I only use vim or gvim. The reason is that where I worked, we used vi
    >>> (the real one)

    >> every time i ACCIDENTALLY get into vi i get STUCK...can NOT figure out how to do
    >> anything, not even EXIT....and often (in panic) beat my computer into submission
    >> with a 10 pound hammer!!

    >
    > I had that the first weeks as well. I have people seen cursing at vi
    > (which is harder to use then vim) and they were blessed when they send
    > their first email with :wq or :ZZ at the end.
    >
    > The three most importand things I needed to learn when I started:
    > When you open it, you need to inster text. You do that by typing the
    > letter i.
    >
    > Asume you wrote someting and want to be sure you DO NOT
    > want to write it use the following
    > :q!
    > to get into the mode where you do not enter text
    > : to tell there is a command coming
    > q which is the quit mode
    > ! so it does not ask for permission to quit without writing anything.
    >
    > If you DO want to write it: `:wq` (write quit)
    >
    > What I also do is copy /usr/share/doc/packages/vim/vimrc_example1 to
    > ~/.vimrc (OK, I now use something different)
    >
    > Once you have the first three commands above, the rest will follow.
    >
    >> it is a LOT less expensive to just use a more modern *user friendly* editor that
    >> i understand, kinda ;-)

    >
    > Depends on what you want and need. To each his own. You can use gvim for
    > GUI instead of vim for CLI. Start with `vimtutor`. Also there are plenty
    > of pages like http://www.selectorweb.com/vi.html and
    > http://www.linux.ie/articles/tutoria...0.refcard.html
    > vim (and aparently also Emacs, no experience there) are very powerfull
    > and do a bit more then just edit text.
    >
    > They are also made with CLI in mind. CLI is very often still used when
    > system administrators ssh to a remote machine. I found none as easy to
    > use for scripting. Especialy the folding is done much better then
    > anything I have seen so far.
    > http://houghi.org/shots/slides/vim002.php for an example of folding. I
    > do it a bit different now. I just place #{{{ and #}}} anywhere I desire.
    >
    > The great thing however is that there is choice. You run what you want
    > and I run what I want depending on the person and the task. If you
    > change one line in a file every month or so, then vim is not for you. If
    > you use it on a daily basis, then it might be that you want something
    > more then a standard editor and then vim is an option.
    >
    > houghi


    well, with that encouragement (and copy of the example to /home) i was able to
    get in AND OUT without using my nearby hammer!

    thanks...but, it still seems that mc is more humane!

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  13. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    DenverD wrote:

    > well, with that encouragement (and copy of the example to /home) i was able to
    > get in AND OUT without using my nearby hammer!


    You are welcome.

    > thanks...but, it still seems that mc is more humane!


    I understand that you say that. I initially thought the same. Then I
    realized that most system administrators are lazy. (Otherwise they would
    look fit and shave and take a bath once in a while). They also have the
    experience I lack. So if they are using it, then there must be something
    to it.

    As I said, if you want to change one file every month or so, then it is
    not for you. If you start doing much more, work over ssh and do many
    things in CLI anyway, it is a great tool.

    I do a lot in CLI and most if the time I launch it with something like
    "vi `which script.sh`" or "gvi `which script.sh`" because I can't be
    botherd to look where I saved the script. :-D

    houghi
    --
    > Knock-knock.
    > Who's there?
    > Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.


  14. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    houghi wrote:
    > If you DO want to write it: `:wq` (write quit)


    Mostly :x (optional with a ! behind it) is better:
    x for eXit (and ONLY write it when modified)

    :wq will write it even when NOT modified and thus e.g. in makefiles
    will force a lot of unnecessary recompilations, etc.
    --
    ************************************************** *****************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. SSC/ICT **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** *****************

  15. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    Eef Hartman wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >> If you DO want to write it: `:wq` (write quit)

    >
    > Mostly :x (optional with a ! behind it) is better:
    > x for eXit (and ONLY write it when modified)


    The reason I say wq is because it explains two commands at the same time
    Write and Quit. That way you learn you can do Write without the Quit as
    well.
    I personally always use ZZ

    >:wq will write it even when NOT modified and thus e.g. in makefiles
    > will force a lot of unnecessary recompilations, etc.


    Once you are there, you will most likely already learned a lot more
    about vi.

    houghi
    --
    I do not want life insurance.
    I want all people to be genuinely grieving when I die.

    houghi

  16. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    houghi wrote:
    > I personally always use ZZ


    Which is the "graphic mode" equivalent of :x, so yes, indeed
    you _do_ know the difference

    > Once you are there, you will most likely already learned a lot more
    > about vi.


    I've been using it since 1987, so .....

    (even in that O/S which shall not be named in this news conference,
    vim _does_ have a lot of different ports!).
    --
    ************************************************** *****************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. SSC/ICT **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** *****************

  17. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    Eef Hartman wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >> I personally always use ZZ

    >
    > Which is the "graphic mode" equivalent of :x, so yes, indeed
    > you _do_ know the difference


    Also as I am living in an azerty-using country, :wq is as easy to use as
    x. ZZ otoh is not as easy to use and I only started using ZZ when I
    started using qwerty. so obviously YMMV.

    Once starting using qwerty, a lot of things started to make sense. e.g.
    / and ? for searches and the use of ticks, backticks [] and {}

    The most illogical choice is the : in http://

    houghi
    --
    I do not want life insurance.
    I want all people to be genuinely grieving when I die.

    houghi

  18. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist


    > (even in that O/S which shall not be named in this news conference,



    sorry, i thought it was ok to name it as long as we use one of the proper
    spellings...i only know a few of them:

    windoze
    windo$e
    winders
    Micr0$0ft Wind0w$

    need i be whipped?

    --
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  19. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    houghi wrote:
    > The most illogical choice is the : in http://


    It was already there too e.g. in nfs
    (mount nfsserver:/pathname /local_mount_dir),
    in rcp/scp
    (?cp remote_serverathname local_pathname),
    etc etc.

    If you look into rsync to "public servers" it even gets worse:
    rsync remote_server::rsync_module/path_name local_path
    a _double_ : after the server FQDN !!

    And ; (the UN-shifted couldn't be used, of course, it IS already
    special to the shell.

    No, what I considered to be superfluous is the // after that :,
    you already KNOW that there will be a hostname after the :
    --
    ************************************************** *****************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. SSC/ICT **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** *****************

  20. Re: How to Edit etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    On October 20, 2008 09:39, in alt.os.linux.suse, Eef Hartman
    (E.J.M.Hartman@math.tudelft.nl) wrote:

    > houghi wrote:
    >> The most illogical choice is the : in http://

    [snip]
    > No, what I considered to be superfluous is the // after that :,
    > you already KNOW that there will be a hostname after the :


    Apparently, there is a rationale for that "superfluous" double-slash: it
    permits reference material to carry, and a parser to detect and
    resolve, "relative" path names.

    If a resource at http://somewhere/local/path references a resource at
    http:/somewhere-else/sub/path, then (according to RFC 1630), the fully
    qualified path for the referenced resource can be derived to be
    http://somewhere/somewhere-else/sub/path

    The exact wording of RFC1630 says

    If the partial URI starts with a non-zero number of consecutive
    slashes, then everything from the context URI up to (but not
    including) the first occurrence of exactly the same number of
    consecutive slashes which has no greater number of consecutive
    slashes anywhere to the right of it is taken to be the same and
    so prepended to the partial URL to form the full URL.

    In the context of the RFC, http:/somewhere-else/sub/path is a "partial URI",
    and http://somewhere/local/path would be the "context URI" for the document
    containing the "partial URI".

    HTH
    --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | Registered Linux User #112576
    http://pitcher.digitalfreehold.ca/ | GPG public key available by request
    ---------- Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing. ------



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