user gedit does not exist - Suse

This is a discussion on user gedit does not exist - Suse ; Hi, I'm trying to add my native windows driver (ssb) to the blacklist with the following command: su gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist And it is telling me the following: su: user gedit does not exist That isn't right is it?...

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Thread: user gedit does not exist

  1. user gedit does not exist

    Hi,

    I'm trying to add my native windows driver (ssb) to the blacklist with
    the following command:

    su gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

    And it is telling me the following:

    su: user gedit does not exist

    That isn't right is it?

  2. Re: user gedit does not exist

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 12:43:14 -0700, nouveauricheinvestments asked:

    > I'm trying to add my native windows driver (ssb) to the blacklist with
    > the following command:
    >
    > su gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
    >
    > And it is telling me the following:
    >
    > su: user gedit does not exist
    >
    > That isn't right is it?


    Actually, it is right. The user gedit does not exist.

    The command *su* is to changes from one user to another.

    The command to execute a command as another user is *sudo*.

    For both commands, if the target username is omitted, then the target
    user defaults to root.

    Whether or not you will be permitted to execute the desired command
    as the target user with sudo, will be determined by the configuration
    present in the /etc/sudoers file.

  3. Re: user gedit does not exist

    nouveauricheinvestments@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm trying to add my native windows driver (ssb) to the blacklist with
    > the following command:
    >
    > su gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
    >
    > And it is telling me the following:
    >
    > su: user gedit does not exist
    >
    > That isn't right is it?


    no..

    'su gedit' tells the system to give root powers to the user named gedit, which
    you have found does not exist on your system..

    whereas 'su' by itself means give the user using the terminal root powers

    and, 'su -' says give me root powers and roots path

    and, 'sudo gedit' says open the file /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist in gedit while i
    have root powers and my own path..

    see?
    lots at
    man su
    man sudo
    http://rute.2038bug.com/


    --
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE 3.5.7, SUSE Linux
    10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

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