GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0 - Suse

This is a discussion on GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0 - Suse ; I decided to try a clean install of openSUSE 11.0 (with KDE 4), on it's own hard drive, alongside of openSUSE 10.2, which I've been running since it was released. I've had a few problems with the install, the greatest ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0

  1. GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0

    I decided to try a clean install of openSUSE 11.0 (with KDE 4), on
    it's own hard drive, alongside of openSUSE 10.2, which I've been
    running since it was released.

    I've had a few problems with the install, the greatest being that GRUB
    fails to boot both OS's. It sees them both, but produces errors 22
    and 21.

    I think the problem stems from the fact that in openSUSE 11.0, Novell
    changed the device-naming convention from the hd* nomenclature for IDE
    devices, making all[?] drives sd* devices, which used to be reserved
    for SCSI devices.

    There are three drives: two 80GB PATA's, both on the primary IDE
    channel, and a 160GB SATA. Both O/S's agree the SATA drive is /dev/
    sda and share a 2GB swap partition at /dev/sda1.

    10.2 calls the primary master /dev/hda; the primary slave /dev/hdb and
    it's root partition is at sda2.
    11.0 calls the primary master /dev/sdb; the primary slave /dev/sdc and
    it's root partition is at sdc1.

    After the install, GRUB was able to reboot 11.0, but produced error 22
    (something like "invalid drive") when I tried to boot 10.2. Using the
    11.0 install disk, I tried but failed to repair GRUB, so I tried the
    10.2 install disk, which worked. But now I can't boot 11.0! Every
    time I try to modify GRUB, I end-up not being able to boot anything
    and must revert to the method using the 10.2 install disk to repair
    GRUB, allowing me to boot 10.2.

  2. Re: GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0

    droid wrote:
    > I decided to try a clean install of openSUSE 11.0 (with KDE 4), on
    > it's own hard drive, alongside of openSUSE 10.2, which I've been
    > running since it was released.
    >
    > I've had a few problems with the install, the greatest being that GRUB
    > fails to boot both OS's. It sees them both, but produces errors 22
    > and 21.
    >
    > I think the problem stems from the fact that in openSUSE 11.0, Novell
    > changed the device-naming convention from the hd* nomenclature for IDE
    > devices, making all[?] drives sd* devices, which used to be reserved
    > for SCSI devices.


    I have a common boot partition containing /boot/grub with a menu.lst
    which I use for booting four different Linux distros. I edit the
    menu.lst to use the hdxn or the sdxn convention as required by each
    distro. Another method is to use UUIDs for all partitions.

    Copy the menu.lst from /boot/grub in the older installed system and add
    the required parts to the menu.lst in the one which is now booted,
    removing the incorrect entries.

    Another potential problem:

    Does anybody know if SUSE 11.0 formats its partitions at install using
    ext3 with 256 bit inodes. This can cause a problem with older GRUB.
    Fedora 9 has this problem.

    Several new distros are doing this, claiming the 256 bit inode is a step
    towards ext4. I ran into this problem when installing Mandriva 2009 in
    my multi-boot system.--it may not apply to SUSE 11.0 at all, but may be
    a "heads up" for future releases.

    --
    Virg Wall

  3. Re: GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0

    VWWall wrote:
    > Another potential problem:
    >
    > Does anybody know if SUSE 11.0 formats its partitions at install using
    > ext3 with 256 bit inodes. This can cause a problem with older GRUB.
    > Fedora 9 has this problem.
    >
    > Several new distros are doing this, claiming the 256 bit inode is a step
    > towards ext4. I ran into this problem when installing Mandriva 2009 in
    > my multi-boot system.--it may not apply to SUSE 11.0 at all, but may be
    > a "heads up" for future releases.


    Yes it does. From the release notes:

    Inode Size on the Ext3 Filesystem Increased

    The inode size on the ext3 filesystem is increased from 128 to 256 by
    default. This change breaks many existing ext3 tools such as the windows
    tool EXTFS.

    If you depend on such tools, install openSUSE with the old value.

    --
    Don

  4. Re: GRUB can't dual boot both openSUSE 10.2 and 11.0

    Don Raboud wrote:
    > VWWall wrote:
    >> Another potential problem:
    >>
    >> Does anybody know if SUSE 11.0 formats its partitions at install using
    >> ext3 with 256 bit inodes. This can cause a problem with older GRUB.
    >> Fedora 9 has this problem.
    >>
    >> Several new distros are doing this, claiming the 256 bit inode is a step
    >> towards ext4. I ran into this problem when installing Mandriva 2009 in
    >> my multi-boot system.--it may not apply to SUSE 11.0 at all, but may be
    >> a "heads up" for future releases.

    >
    > Yes it does. From the release notes:
    >
    > Inode Size on the Ext3 Filesystem Increased
    >
    > The inode size on the ext3 filesystem is increased from 128 to 256 by
    > default. This change breaks many existing ext3 tools such as the windows
    > tool EXTFS.


    It not only "breaks" Ext2IFS, but windows' own "Disk Management" will
    not show partition labels with the new partitions.

    > If you depend on such tools, install openSUSE with the old value.


    Thanks for the info. I hadn't tried SUSE 11.0 yet, but had the problem
    with a fresh install of Mandriva 2009. This install has a check-box for
    formatting, so it's possible to pre-format with the old ext3 and
    un-check the "format" box during install.

    For some work-around: (I assume this would work with SUSE 11.0.)

    http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=191363

    "There's been some talk lately and a Bugzilla report about the problem
    being caused for GRUB by the 256-byte inodes in the filesystems
    apparently created by default in Fedora 9. People have discovered that
    GRUBs that have not been patched for this issue (older Fedoras and some
    other distros) can't boot Fedora 9. Some of them resorted to installing
    Fedora 9 into partitions created in advance with 128-byte inodes. That
    worked to allow older existing GRUB boot loader arrangements to boot
    Fedora 9."

    --
    Virg Wall

+ Reply to Thread