What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local? - Suse

This is a discussion on What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local? - Suse ; Hello folks! I have the following problem: I have a 3Ware-Raid-Controller. For better performance the vendor thells me the following: *********************** For Linux kernel 2.6, If you enter the following command: blockdev --setra X /dev/sda (i.e. blockdev --setra 16384 /dev/sda) ...

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Thread: What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local?

  1. What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local?

    Hello folks!

    I have the following problem:

    I have a 3Ware-Raid-Controller. For better performance the vendor thells me
    the following:

    ***********************

    For Linux kernel 2.6, If you enter the following command:
    blockdev --setra X /dev/sda (i.e. blockdev --setra 16384 /dev/sda)

    (Note: 16384 is just an example value. You will have to do testing to
    determine the optimal value for your system). The OS will read-ahead X
    pages, and throughput will be higher.

    To make the change available every time you boot, you can add the
    'blockdev --setra 16384 /dev/sda', 'blockdev --setra 16384 /dev/sdb',
    'blockdev --setra 16384 /dev/sdc', etc. to /etc/rc.d/rc.local .

    You can also put a setting in /etc/sysctl.conf which will set the read-ahead
    on boot: /sys/bus/scsi/drivers/sd/[DEVICEID]/block/queue/read_ahead_kb

    ********************

    Now I want to make this setting permanent.
    1. Unfortunately there is no /etc/rc.d/rc.local in my openSUSE 11 system.
    What should I do in my case?
    2. I found that "read_ahead_kb" mentioned. It says "128". What am I supposed
    to enter there, the same value as I chose for blockdev? And what does "You
    can also put..." mean? Should I or should I not? And how do I make that
    change permanent?

    Thank you for every peace of advice!
    Greeting
    Tom

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  2. Re: What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local?

    > 2. I found that "read_ahead_kb" mentioned. It says "128". What am I
    > supposed to enter there, the same value as I chose for blockdev?


    I am asking this, because "bockdev --setra N" sets to N 512byte secors,
    while I suppose that the "read_ahead_kb" sets something in kilobyte? So just
    entering the same value (2176 for blockdev --setra in my case) doesn't
    really make sense, istn't it?

    Best regards
    Tom


  3. Re: What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local?

    Tom wrote:
    > Now I want to make this setting permanent.
    > 1. Unfortunately there is no /etc/rc.d/rc.local in my openSUSE 11 system.
    > What should I do in my case?


    /etc/init.d/boot.local


    houghi
    --
    How do you ask a man to be the last man to die in Iraq?
    How do you ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake?

  4. Re: What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local?

    >> 1. Unfortunately there is no /etc/rc.d/rc.local in my openSUSE 11 system.
    >> What should I do in my case?


    > /etc/init.d/boot.local


    Thank you houghi!
    --
    Help keep the usenet free!
    Use and/or support (e.g. by setting up an own server) the nonprofit
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  5. Re: What is the equivalent in openSUSE to /etc/rc.d/rc.local?

    On Thu, 02 Oct 2008 12:33:48 +0200, houghi wrote:

    > Tom wrote:
    >> Now I want to make this setting permanent. 1. Unfortunately there is no
    >> /etc/rc.d/rc.local in my openSUSE 11 system. What should I do in my
    >> case?

    >
    > /etc/init.d/boot.local


    NB. boot.local may or may not be what you want.

    boot.local is run after the boot.* scripts but BEFORE any runlevel
    scripts. Whereas rc.local is normally run after the runlevel scripts.

    In your case it will probably be what you want, as you are setting up a
    block device that presumably will already exist by this time and won't
    have any dependencies on anything that is started later.

    If you do need to run you script later, you can actually create a proper
    init script. There are some skeleton scripts in /etc/init.d/ that you
    can use as a basis for your init script. I have had to do that for a few
    things I would normally have started in rc.local, but can't do in
    boot.local



    --
    Regards,
    David Bailey
    david _AT_ bailey dot id dot au

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