Ping Math to Kbps - Suse

This is a discussion on Ping Math to Kbps - Suse ; Can one of you technical math minds figure this out for me . . . . I am trying to find my connection speed to the internet I PING www.google.com I get back statistics that say 64 bytes from (IP-address) ...

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Thread: Ping Math to Kbps

  1. Ping Math to Kbps

    Can one of you technical math minds figure this out for me . . . .
    I am trying to find my connection speed to the internet
    I PING www.google.com
    I get back statistics that say
    64 bytes from (IP-address)
    8 packets transmitted, 8 packets received, 0 loss
    120ms avg round-trip

    Show me the math please to convert this to actual Kbps in a 768Kbps to
    3Mbps DSL connection

    Thanks
    Paul

    --


  2. Re: Ping Math to Kbps

    PaulRS wrote:
    > Can one of you technical math minds figure this out for me . . . .
    > I am trying to find my connection speed to the internet
    > I PING www.google.com
    > I get back statistics that say
    > 64 bytes from (IP-address)
    > 8 packets transmitted, 8 packets received, 0 loss
    > 120ms avg round-trip
    >
    > Show me the math please to convert this to actual Kbps in a 768Kbps to
    > 3Mbps DSL connection
    >
    > Thanks
    > Paul
    >


    You don't use ping for "bandwidth" testing. The ping time gives
    you just ping time latencies.... which may or may not be interesting.

    Since you have access to Internet resources... try a web based
    tester... e.g. http://www.dslreports.com/speedtest or
    http://www.speakeasy.net/speedtest/ or http://www.speedtest.net/

    (there are many others)



  3. Re: Ping Math to Kbps

    PaulRS wrote:

    > Can one of you technical math minds figure this out for me . . . .
    > I am trying to find my connection speed to the internet
    > I PING www.google.com
    > I get back statistics that say
    > 64 bytes from (IP-address)
    > 8 packets transmitted, 8 packets received, 0 loss
    > 120ms avg round-trip
    >
    > Show me the math please to convert this to actual Kbps in a 768Kbps to
    > 3Mbps DSL connection


    Weeeell, 64 BYTES in 60ms (half round-trip) translates to 8.5kbps :P

    I'd suggest you try http://www.speedtest.net for a more realistic
    estimate of your connection speed.

    --
    Huibert
    "Hey! HEY! Curious cat, here!" -- Krosp I (GG)

  4. Re: Ping Math to Kbps

    The reason I asked this question:
    I had been using the Verizon Speedtest because the connection
    seemed so slow. Sometimes it read under 350Kbps and 5 minutes later
    1.8Mbps. I called Verizon to check for problems. One test they had
    me do was the PING of google to see how fast the connection APART FROM
    their test. They still have not solved the fast/slow thing. I was
    using:
    http://infospeed.verizon.net for a Verizon DSL connection

    Thanks for the info that I am trying to compare "apples and oranges" -
    Not sure what the Verizon tech was doing then???

    Paul
    --


  5. Re: Ping Math to Kbps

    On 30 Sep 2008 17:32:23 GMT
    "PaulRS" wrote:

    >Can one of you technical math minds figure this out for me . . . .
    > I am trying to find my connection speed to the internet
    > I PING www.google.com
    > I get back statistics that say
    > 64 bytes from (IP-address)
    > 8 packets transmitted, 8 packets received, 0 loss
    > 120ms avg round-trip
    >
    >Show me the math please to convert this to actual Kbps in a 768Kbps to
    >3Mbps DSL connection
    >


    In addition to the online speedtests, you can use 'bing' as well. You
    can install it with:

    zypper install bing

    and then:

    man bing


    It's all of 50KB in size . . . :-)


    --
    Kevin Nathan (Arizona, USA)
    Linux Potpourri and a.o.l.s. FAQ -- (temporarily offline)

    Open standards. Open source. Open minds.
    The command line is the front line.
    Linux 2.6.25.16-0.1-pae
    10:10pm up 10 days 3:11, 19 users, load average: 0.40, 0.40, 0.44


  6. Re: Ping Math to Kbps

    On 30 Sep 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.suse, in article
    , PaulRS wrote:

    >The reason I asked this question:
    > I had been using the Verizon Speedtest because the connection
    >seemed so slow. Sometimes it read under 350Kbps and 5 minutes later
    >1.8Mbps.


    Do you drive a car? How fast can you drive from... I dunno, how
    about Bethpage (Long Island, NY) to Saint Louis, Missouri? Don't
    you think it might have something to do with the amount of traffic
    on the roads? Simple point - Verizon provides a connection that
    might be capable of 3000 Megabit/second but "caps" (limits) it to
    some value that you are paying for - perhaps 3 Megabit/Second
    (so that you don't hog all of that 3000 Megabit), and then they also
    sell the same service to a million of your neighbors because they
    know that everyone won't be going to school/work/shopping at the same
    time. Using these numbers, only 1000 people can get their "full"
    bandwidth at any given moment, and if more people than that try, it's
    like a traffic congestion on the roads - traffic slows down.

    >I called Verizon to check for problems. One test they had me do was
    >the PING of google to see how fast the connection APART FROM their
    >test. They still have not solved the fast/slow thing.


    If you pay more, they might be able to offer a "faster" connection...
    until they sell the same service to a million other people.

    >Thanks for the info that I am trying to compare "apples and oranges" -


    You gauge speed by timing how long it takes to transfer a substantial
    amount of traffic. You want to grab something large enough so that
    you can time it on your watch - perhaps the source of the latest
    kernel from ftp.kernel.org which is about 50 or 60 megabytes, and see
    and see how long that takes. The idea is a large file, so that you
    blinking and missing when the file has completed the download won't be
    significant. But remember that route from Bethpage to Saint Louis?
    ftp.kernel.org is about 20 miles / 30 KM Southeast of San Francisco,
    and you may run into traffic on I-80 or any of the other streets or
    freeways you use along the way. See the problem?

    >Not sure what the Verizon tech was doing then???


    The tech doesn't know either. BRIEFLY - the variation you are seeing
    is a function of how many cars^H^H^H^Hpackets are trying to share the
    same road^H^H^H^Hwire at the same time. It's normal.

    Old guy

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