How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another? - Suse

This is a discussion on How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another? - Suse ; There are several well known UNIX systems like Solaris, AIX or HP UX and also many well known Linux Distros like SUSE and RedHat. I wonder if somebody becomes a good administrator on a Linux Distro if he will be ...

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Thread: How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another?

  1. How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another?

    There are several well known UNIX systems like Solaris, AIX or HP UX
    and also many well known Linux Distros like SUSE and RedHat. I wonder
    if somebody becomes a good administrator on a Linux Distro if he will
    be able to do basic administration of a UNIX system or if somebody is
    good administrator of one UNIX System if she will be able to do basic
    admin of another UNIX system. How different are SUSE Linux and Solaris
    from an administrator point of view?

  2. Re: How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another?

    On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 20:49:43 -0700, Artificer wrote:

    > There are several well known UNIX systems like Solaris, AIX or HP UX and
    > also many well known Linux Distros like SUSE and RedHat. I wonder if
    > somebody becomes a good administrator on a Linux Distro if he will be
    > able to do basic administration of a UNIX system or if somebody is good
    > administrator of one UNIX System if she will be able to do basic admin
    > of another UNIX system. How different are SUSE Linux and Solaris from an
    > administrator point of view?


    Either way, you'll definitely have a leg up, but you will find
    differences in configuration files and their locations.

  3. Re: How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another?

    On 2008-09-29 05:49, Artificer wrote:
    > There are several well known UNIX systems like Solaris, AIX or HP UX
    > and also many well known Linux Distros like SUSE and RedHat. I wonder
    > if somebody becomes a good administrator on a Linux Distro if he will
    > be able to do basic administration of a UNIX system or if somebody is
    > good administrator of one UNIX System if she will be able to do basic
    > admin of another UNIX system. How different are SUSE Linux and Solaris
    > from an administrator point of view?


    Well, there are much that differ the unix systems from each others too.
    I started as Unix admin, and mostly Solaris , but I was playing with linux
    in the early days on my spear time, just to learn it.
    (kernel 0.96 I think it was)

    There is 2 major differences that may or not may be important.

    first, a linux system is adjusted a bit to play well as a non productive
    system for a single user, who turn the computer off when it's not in use.
    The cron system is reconstructed for that, so jobs are running when the system
    is up, while the old unixes has jobs that only run some nights, and really don't
    like to be powered off when the user go to bed.

    Second, linux systems are build with gnu software, while other unixes has their
    own utils and gnu software on top of it, which you must think of when you work
    with them, eg. tar on linux is gtar on unix, or you get the system default tar
    that can make a mess of your files.

    But once you are a good admin of linux or unix you know how to read manuals and
    figure out how it works.

    /bb

  4. Re: How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another?

    On Mon, 29 Sep 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.suse, in article
    , bb wrote:

    >Artificer wrote:


    >> There are several well known UNIX systems like Solaris, AIX or HP UX
    >> and also many well known Linux Distros like SUSE and RedHat. I wonder
    >> if somebody becomes a good administrator on a Linux Distro if he will
    >> be able to do basic administration of a UNIX system or if somebody is
    >> good administrator of one UNIX System if she will be able to do basic
    >> admin of another UNIX system.


    If you are learning the underlying core - rather than the individual
    GUI tools that are tailored from a specific UNIX or Linux distribution,
    then you've got a good start.

    >> How different are SUSE Linux and Solaris from an administrator point
    >> of view?


    How different is chocolate ice-cream from vanilla? They're both
    ice cream, but the flavoring is very different. Does that make them
    incompatible? Learning to make or eat one won't work on the other?

    Each has it's "proprietary" tools - you won't find YAST on other Linux
    distributions (never mind on UNIX), just as you won't find SMIT on
    anything other than AIX, or SAM on anything but HP-UX. But 'vi' (or
    clones like 'vim' or 'nvi') are found on all, just as a Bourne type
    shell (either '/bin/sh' itself, or one of many improved versions like
    ksh, bash, ash, zsh, and so on) are always there.

    >There is 2 major differences that may or not may be important.
    >
    >first, a linux system is adjusted a bit to play well as a non
    >productive system for a single user, who turn the computer off when
    >it's not in use. The cron system is reconstructed for that, so jobs
    >are running when the system is up, while the old unixes has jobs that
    >only run some nights, and really don't like to be powered off when
    >the user go to bed.


    crond (8) - cron daemon (Dillon's Cron)

    cron (8) - daemon to execute scheduled commands (Vixie Cron)

    crond (8) - A daemon for time scheduled execution of commands
    (ucrond version 1.4.1)

    anacron (8) - runs commands periodically

    fcron (8) - daemon to execute scheduled tasks

    Dillon and Vixie cron are classic cron daemons, that will run jobs at
    specific times of day/week/month. If the system is off or in single
    user mode (SysV run-level 1), cron is not run, and any tasks scheduled
    to run at that time will not run - now, or when the system goes back
    to multi-user mode. There is no 'catch-up' mode for these (or the
    standard UNIX) cron daemons. 'anacron' only operates in a 'delay after
    system start' mode, and will run any/all cron-jobs that haven't been
    run in the scheduled (for each task) daily (or greater) interval.
    'ucrond' and 'fcron' _can_ be configured to run in the "classic" 'run
    at a particular time of day' manner (as Dillon and Vixie cron do), but
    they can also be set to operate in a 'delay after system start' mode
    like anacron. Thus, the cron behavior depends on which daemon is
    installed on your system, and possibly how that daemon is configured.

    >Second, linux systems are build with gnu software, while other unixes
    >has their own utils and gnu software on top of it, which you must think
    >of when you work with them, eg. tar on linux is gtar on unix, or you
    >get the system default tar that can make a mess of your files.


    Ah, you've been bit by that little difference too. And don't forget
    the *BSDs which have their own similarities and differences.

    >But once you are a good admin of linux or unix you know how to read
    >manuals and figure out how it works.


    Someone has pointed out the similarities between *nix administrators
    and auto mechanics. While less true today because of the computers
    used in cars (and the specialized GUI tools from each manufacturer),
    a mechanic trained on Toyotas, Fords or BMWs can work on Hondas,
    Chevys or Mercedes a heck of a lot easier than a person who is a
    trained plumber or lawyer and knows nothing about motor vehicles.

    Old guy

  5. Re: How different is one UNIX or LINUX from another?

    Thanks a lot for all your answers!!!


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