openSUSE as small bussiness server - Suse

This is a discussion on openSUSE as small bussiness server - Suse ; On Sep 30, 2:46*am, Vahis wrote: > On 2008-09-30, Artificer wrote: > > > > > > > > >> According to my experience upgrading from 10.3 to 11.0 was like a couple > >> of hours at the beach ...

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Thread: openSUSE as small bussiness server

  1. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    On Sep 30, 2:46*am, Vahis wrote:
    > On 2008-09-30, Artificer wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >> According to my experience upgrading from 10.3 to 11.0 was like a couple
    > >> of hours at the beach

    >
    > >> I've done several upgrades, even 10.0 to 10.2 was quite easy although there
    > >> was a version leap. That happened because I skipped 10.1 after trying it
    > >> for some time. That's the only version I've skipped after starting to
    > >> run Suse as my distro of choice.

    >
    > >> This is probably, at least partially, due to my systems being close to
    > >> vanilla, only packman stuff added.

    >
    > >> Coming from 10.3 to 11.0 was quite pleasant.
    > >> There you can change also packman and other extra repos on the fly
    > >> during the upgrading installation, so you miss all the "fun" of
    > >> temporary depency problems. These dependency problems used to be something
    > >> you had to deal with in upgrades prior to 11.0.

    >
    > >> > the 2 years of lifecycle for openSUSE what
    > >> > really mean?

    >
    > >> It means that after two years from publishing an openSUSE version Novell
    > >> stops security patching it.

    >
    > > Is Novell that provides the patches or opensuse.org? I mean is Novell
    > > or the comunity the one that decided the 2-year lifecycle?

    >
    > Novell sponsors the opanSUSE development team which administrates
    > openSUSE.
    >
    > > If I choose
    > > to install openSUSE 11 and I dont want to upgrade every six months can
    > > I just wait untill the end of the lifecycle and do upgrades only every
    > > 2 years? Will be hard to upgrade after two years of missing upgrades?

    >
    > See my answer above. I have done both, as many others have and will.
    > First you need to know what you are using you system for, then you need
    > to maintain your goals. It obviously means installing and administrating
    > the current version as phase one.
    > In phases from there on you obviously install and test the upcoming new
    > versions on a test bed and decide whether you skip a version or upgrade
    > to that.
    >
    > Just an example: I kept 10.0 as long as it lived because I didn't want
    > 10.1 due to my testing period experiences.
    > I went from 10.0 to 10.2. I needed to because 10.0 was about to end.
    > 10.2 was very good, but still I went to 10.3 due to my testring
    > experiences, I liked it and there was probably something I wanted then.
    > .
    > Then I changed to 64 bit HW. 11.0 was out, so I made a fresh install on
    > new HW. Now I'm on 11.0 and I've upgraded also the 32 bit machines.
    >
    > Either way can be and has been done many, many times.


    Great answer thanks. For your answers should I undertand that you are
    using openSUSE on a production environment? Do you mind sharing what
    are you using it for and how nice or wicked the experience has been?

  2. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    Artificer wrote:
    > Great answer thanks. For your answers should I undertand that you are
    > using openSUSE on a production environment? Do you mind sharing what
    > are you using it for and how nice or wicked the experience has been?


    Let us make this easier for everybodty. You tell us what you want to do
    withit and then we will confirm that is possible with it.

    Also even if I told you that I use mine as a news server since several
    years, that would mean absolutely nothing to you as usefull information.

    So this is the best you can do. Stop asking us questions and start
    giving questions to yourself.

    Make a list of what you want. Be as precise as possible. "Having a
    stable enviroment" is not precise.

    Begin with writing down what the users need. Then what you need. Then
    the wants and some 'nice to haves'. Put them all in order of priority
    and see which one is stronger.

    Include the people who must pay for this (and see if they have a need
    that you can barter with).

    In the end the answer of what you will be using will become pretty
    obvious as long as you have asked the right answers.

    To me it looks as if you are working at a small company that has Windows
    all over the place and you told the boss that Linux would be much better
    and he called your bluff.

    To end it of, some nice and wicked examples I have had. The nice ones?
    Everything worked. The wicket one? Nothing did.

    houghi
    --
    Microsoft says, "Where do you want to go today?"
    Apple says, "Where do you want to go tomorrow?"
    FOSS says, "Are you coming, or what?"

  3. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    On 2008-09-30, Artificer wrote:
    > On Sep 30, 2:46¬*am, Vahis wrote:
    >> On 2008-09-30, Artificer wrote:
    >>



    >
    > Great answer thanks. For your answers should I undertand that you are
    > using openSUSE on a production environment?


    Yes, you should, gradually.

    You may also notice that some temperatures may just slowly start rising
    here and there among people answering to you

    >Do you mind sharing what
    > are you using it for and how nice or wicked the experience has been?


    HTTP server (Apache)

    MySQL server

    File server:
    NFS server
    Samba server

    Thin client server

    Virtual machine server

    Watching porn.

    Listening to FZ.

    If you must know: The experience has been overwhelming

    Like houghi said, (I said so, too) determine what you are looking for and
    a lot of people can confirm if what you want is doable.

    I'm pretty sure that what you want to do is as easy or easier to do with
    openSUSE as it would be in any other environment.

    I wonder if this is those home work questions again?

    --
    Vahis
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    Congressman Wilson has an expression:
    "You can teach them to type, but you can't teach them to grow tits."

  4. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    I work for a large consulting firm on the dominican republic. We
    provide support on MS, Solaris and IBM AS/400 platforms. Over the year
    I have used UNIX to some degree and I have play around with Linux. Now
    I am considering about getting serious on Linux. So at this point I am
    just trying to figure out the general capacities and realistic
    scenarios for different Linux Distro both commercial and not
    commercial ones.

    I have to say that I am greatfull for all the answers received so far
    and I think I already have the information I was looking for. At this
    point I am testing openSUSE on virtualized 32 & 64 bit environment
    configured with SAMBA and Apache so as you can see I cant be more
    specific since I am not doing anything in specific yet but getting use
    to system and its pros and cons. Again thans everybody and I apologize
    if I disturbed anybody!

  5. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    Artificer wrote:


    This is not a flame. This is advice on how to get better help and keep
    this newsgroup clean
    Short story: Please read http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/

    Long story:
    Google unfortunately decided not to use the standards of quoting on
    Usenet. There are several solutions to this problem. The best is to use a
    newsreader. For Windows there is e.g. FreeAgent and for Linux there is
    Pan, Knode or slrn, among others.

    Just point your newsreader to your providers Usenet server. If they do not
    have a Usenetserver, look up a payserver, like http://giganews.com or a
    free server like news.sunsite.dk (registration required)

    Now what if you are not at home all the time and that is your reason to
    select google? Glad you asked.
    If you have a fixed connection, you can use a dyndns server to make a
    connection to your home linux machine over ssl and use anything that is
    on your home computer.
    e.g. ssh home.example.com and then run slrn. GUI interfaces are possible
    as well on any OS.
    If you are unable to keep a connection up, you can register at
    http://www.rootshell.be and then connect to there and use slrn on that
    machine. slrn is textbased and might be scary at first. As Usenet is
    text anyway, you will very fast learn how to use it and configure it.

    Only if all else fails and you have no option in using Usnet in any other
    way, including waiting till you get home, you can use Google. You can
    still quote correctly as described on the following page:
    http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/

    Understand that many people already filter out google postings. So best
    look for an alternative. Usenet is not WWW. If you want WWW, look up
    a webforum. This is not a webforum.

    I sympathize with your problems, and am more than willing to help you
    solve them. To do so you should follow the correct quoting principles
    and good Netiquette explained in this FAQ available at;
    http://www.plainfaqs.org/linux/

    Until then I and many other regulars who could give you good advice
    won't do so. So in the interest of solving your problems, quote correctly
    and ask Google to reinstate the correct way of quoting.

    Remember: this was not a flame, this was helping you to get the best response
    and help possible.

    houghi
    --
    They say pesticides have been linked to low sperm counts.
    In my opinion if you have bugs down there that are so bad
    you need to use a pesticide, you're not gonna get laid anyway.

  6. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    GŁnther Schwarz wrote:
    >>>I rather doubt that one will find more openSuSE as compared to SLES
    >>>installations in professional use. And a critical bug reported by one

    >>
    >> Eh? Why the doubt?

    >
    > Because life cycle is too short and the distribution is not certified by
    > the hardware companies. Though I have no numbers to back up my claim. A
    > quick glance on the top 500 list in supercomputing shows mostly
    > unspecified Linux and then SLES with about 5.6% share. Not really
    > impressive, but more than any other specified Linux distribution or for
    > AIX. Here the destops running OpenSuSE can not outweigh the number of
    > SLES installation for computing and network services.


    The top 500 is a very limited list and does not say very much about how
    many systems there are used in the real world.
    As it goes with statistics, it could mean that everybody uses SLES or it
    means that running a super computer is the only thing it is good for. It
    doesn't even mean that SLES is good for that purpose, just that it is
    used for that purpose.

    Could be that Novell heavily sponsors these things so that you think it
    is THE choice to make. It can mean anything and therefore it means
    nothing.

    There are many hosters that use openSUSE instead of SLES.


    > Well said. If your costumers are happy and you like to use OpenSuSE and
    > provide them with the service they need there will be nothing to
    > discuss about. I did not want to argue against the use of this
    > distribution in general. My concerns are if it is a good starting point
    > for an unexperienced admin.


    First it is openSUSE, not OpenSuSE. The lowercase u has been
    abandondoned some years ago.
    Secondly openSUSE is as good a starting point for an unexperienced
    admin as SLE is. The tools are identical.

    houghi
    --
    Quote correct (NL) http://www.briachons.org/art/quote/
    Zitiere richtig (DE) http://www.afaik.de/usenet/faq/zitieren
    Quote correctly (EN) http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html

  7. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    houghi wrote:

    > GŁnther Schwarz wrote:


    > First it is openSUSE, not OpenSuSE. The lowercase u has been
    > abandondoned some years ago.


    You commented on my spelling in this group some time ago. I still
    consider this as unimportant.

    > Secondly openSUSE is as good a starting point for an unexperienced
    > admin as SLE is. The tools are identical.


    It will all depend on what services one wants to run. Good luck in
    installing eDirectory or cluster services on OpenSuSE! Here even Xen
    did not work properly. I even filed a bug. But as SLES does the job
    properly I do not care anymore. One working system is enough for me.

    GŁnther

  8. Re: openSUSE as small bussiness server

    GŁnther Schwarz wrote:
    >> First it is openSUSE, not OpenSuSE. The lowercase u has been
    >> abandondoned some years ago.

    >
    > You commented on my spelling in this group some time ago. I still
    > consider this as unimportant.


    It might be unimportand. It is another thing to willingly spell it
    wrong, especially when pointed out that you made a small error. I am
    sure that was not the case.

    houghi
    --



    This space left blank intentionaly

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