File server - Suse

This is a discussion on File server - Suse ; Hello all, I would like to have a mail and file server on my Linux box. The idea is that I have few Users (Windows boxes) who have a tree of shared folders (each folder can has different rights and ...

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Thread: File server

  1. File server

    Hello all,

    I would like to have a mail and file server on my Linux box.
    The idea is that I have few Users (Windows boxes) who have a tree of
    shared folders (each folder can has different rights and can be
    forbidden for some users). These shared folders are placed on Linux
    box-server, type of stored files - .doc, .xls, .txt, .pdf, .eml, .jpg.

    Windows users are allowed to connect to the tree of folders and add,
    delete or modify files/folders (and subfolders) within the "tree".

    What is more, there should be some file-locking mechanism, that
    "locks" for writing an opened file, but unlocks it whenever the file
    is returned (closed).
    I.e. - User A opens a document for writing, so Users B, C, D ... can
    open it for read-only as long as User A keeps this file opened.

    The tree could look like this:
    TOP
    | - Folder A (all rights for all allowed users)
    | - Folder B (all rights for User A, B, but not C)
    | - Subfolder B (inherits access rights from Folder B)
    - File B1 (inherits access rights from Folder B)
    - File B2 (inherits access rights from Folder B)
    - ...
    | - Folder C (all rights User A, read-only User B, no rights for User
    C)

    Is Samba a proper solution for my task?
    What else would I need for that?
    What tools are needed for assigning access rights to a tree of shared
    folders?
    What Windows-Client could I use to "surf" the shared folders tree, as
    the rights to each folder depend on user who tries to access them?
    All connections will come from Trusted LAN, which is behind good
    firewall, so no encryption is needed, but still there must be some log
    in mechanism.

    I am expecting something that would look-like and work-like shared-
    folders from Novell Groupwise, which stores all documents in a
    Library, grants access rights to different users and blocks opened
    files.

    Hope You can help me or lead me to a ready-made solution that already
    exists.

    With regards,

    Chris

  2. Re: File server

    Chris

    Yes, Samba

    You can regard samba as being a free replacement for a Windows server.

    You can even run the advanced authentication services (like AD and
    domains) under samba.

    The Windows client is the standard inbuilt networking one. You can
    connect with UNC or mapped drives.

    You can setup rights at the samba config level, chown/chgrp/acl's and so on.

    I would assume that the SuSE/Yast config would do most of the work for
    you but I have personally been hand editing the stuff for years instead!

    Cheers Bob

    krzysiek kubeczka wrote:
    > Is Samba a proper solution for my task?
    > What else would I need for that?
    > What tools are needed for assigning access rights to a tree of shared
    > folders?
    > What Windows-Client could I use to "surf" the shared folders tree, as
    > the rights to each folder depend on user who tries to access them?


  3. Re: File server

    On Fri, 26 Sep 2008 02:20:03 -0700, krzysiek kubeczka wrote:

    > What is more, there should be some file-locking mechanism, that
    > "locks" for writing an opened file, but unlocks it whenever the
    > file is returned (closed).


    From <http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...TO-Collection/
    locking.html>

    QUOTE

    Chapter 17. File and Record Locking

    Features and Benefits

    Samba provides all the same locking semantics that MS Windows
    clients expect and that MS Windows NT4/200x servers also provide.

    The term locking has exceptionally broad meaning and covers a range
    of functions that are all categorized under this one term.

    Opportunistic locking is a desirable feature when it can enhance the
    perceived performance of applications on a networked client. However,
    the opportunistic locking protocol is not robust and therefore can
    encounter problems when invoked beyond a simplistic configuration or
    on extended slow or faulty networks. In these cases, operating system
    management of opportunistic locking and/or recovering from repetitive
    errors can offset the perceived performance advantage that it is
    intended to provide.

    The MS Windows network administrator needs to be aware that file and
    record locking semantics (behavior) can be controlled either in Samba
    *or by way of registry settings on the MS Windows client*.

    UNQUOTE

    > What tools are needed for assigning access rights to a tree of shared
    > folders?


    The way to assign groups to a user is to create different groups with
    appropriate rights, eg a read only group, a write group, etc etc.

    See Chapter 12 of the Samba 3 HOWTO



    which includes details of the tools used for creating groups,
    adding members to groups and how these can be mapped to those on
    the MS-Windows clients.

    > What Windows-Client could I use to "surf" the shared folders tree


    My Network Places? This question about MS-Windows software should be
    directed towards readers of a Micro$loth dedicated news group.

  4. Re: File server

    On Fri, 26 Sep 2008 02:20:03 -0700, krzysiek kubeczka wrote:

    > What tools are needed for assigning access rights to a tree of shared
    > folders?


    As well as group membership, I forgot to mention ACLs (access control
    lists).

    You can get an overviews of ACLs in Samba at

    <http://searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com/
    tip/0,289483,sid39_gci1080966,00.html>

    For an out of the box SAMBA file server, you should peruse
    the site for information about one such possibility



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