After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE - Suse

This is a discussion on After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE - Suse ; The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting. After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the CLI ...

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Thread: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

  1. After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am now.

    I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and now
    doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new kernel.
    How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where do I go
    to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?

    Thanks,
    --
    Godzilla

  2. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    Godzilla wrote:

    > The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    > available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    > After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    > CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    > Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am
    > now.
    >
    > I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and now
    > doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new kernel.
    > How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where do I go
    > to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?
    >
    > Thanks,


    Boot using your installation disk. Choose 'hard disk' at the first screen.
    Once on the desktop do the following in a terminal:

    1. su
    2. give root password
    3. mkinitrd && SuSEconfig
    4. when this completes 'exit'
    5. To be certain your boot menu reflects the updated kernel & kernel
    modules run Yast -> System -> Bootloader. Make sure the info is correct
    otherwise you'll need to select 'other' in the main bootloader menu
    then 'Reread configuration from disk' to detect the new kernel/modules..
    Then click 'Finish' to save... Make certain the boot loader reflects your
    newly installed kernel version# !!!

    Rebootind should work now.

  3. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    Michael Soibelman wrote:

    > Godzilla wrote:
    >
    >> The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    >> available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    >> After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    >> CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    >> Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am
    >> now.
    >>
    >> I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and
    >> now doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new
    >> kernel. How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where
    >> do I go to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?
    >>
    >> Thanks,

    >
    > Boot using your installation disk. Choose 'hard disk' at the first
    > screen. Once on the desktop do the following in a terminal:
    >
    > 1. su
    > 2. give root password
    > 3. mkinitrd && SuSEconfig
    > 4. when this completes 'exit'
    > 5. To be certain your boot menu reflects the updated kernel & kernel
    > modules run Yast -> System -> Bootloader. Make sure the info is correct
    > otherwise you'll need to select 'other' in the main bootloader menu
    > then 'Reread configuration from disk' to detect the new kernel/modules..
    > Then click 'Finish' to save... Make certain the boot loader reflects
    > your newly installed kernel version# !!!
    >
    > Rebootind should work now.


    It was a good try, but when I chose 'hard disk' at the first screen I was
    right back at square one with 'error 15: File not found' again.

    It doesn't recognize my partition with openSUSE 11.0 because the identifier
    in menu.lst has the old kernel specified. If I can find out the number of
    the new kernel, it will be easy to edit menu.lst from within UBUNTU,
    which is where I am now.

    But thanks anyway for your attempt to help

    Godzilla


    --
    Godzilla

  4. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    Godzilla wrote:
    > The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    > available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    > After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    > CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    > Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am now.
    >
    > I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and now
    > doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new kernel.
    > How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where do I go
    > to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?
    >
    > Thanks,


    Odd. I had no problem after the kernel update.

  5. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    Claude Hopper wrote:

    > Godzilla wrote:
    >> The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    >> available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    >> After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    >> CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    >> Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am
    >> now.
    >>
    >> I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and
    >> now doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new
    >> kernel. How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where
    >> do I go to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?
    >>
    >> Thanks,

    >
    > Odd. I had no problem after the kernel update.


    Then since you also had the kernel update, could you post the numbers of the
    new kernel?

    Thanks,

    Godzilla
    --
    Godzilla

  6. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2008, Godzilla wrote:-

    >Then since you also had the kernel update, could you post the numbers of the
    >new kernel?


    The latest kernel packages I can see on the update mirror I use[0] are
    version 2.6.25.16


    [0] ftp5.gwdg.de

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32b | | openSUSE 10.3 32b | openSUSE 11.0 32b
    | openSUSE 10.2 64b | openSUSE 10.3 64b | openSUSE 11.0 64b
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC | RISC OS 3.11

  7. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    David Bolt wrote:

    > On Thu, 11 Sep 2008, Godzilla wrote:-
    >
    >>Then since you also had the kernel update, could you post the
    >>numbers of the new kernel?

    >
    > The latest kernel packages I can see on the update mirror I use[0]
    > are version 2.6.25.16
    >
    >
    > [0] ftp5.gwdg.de
    >
    > Regards,
    > David Bolt
    >


    That was all that I needed. Once I changed the kernel numbers in
    /boot/grub/menu.lst to reflect the new kernel, everything was back to
    normal and I can boot wherever I choose again. :-)

    Thanks

    Godzilla

  8. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    Godzilla wrote:

    >The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    >available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    >After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    >CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    >Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am now.


    >I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and now
    >doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new kernel.
    >How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where do I go
    >to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?


    Sounds like the problem that I have with a couple of openSUSE 10.3
    systems.

    The boot device may have the wrong hard disc device/partition for
    the kernel, etc in menu.lst. That file is in /boot/grub/

    You could edit that file after mounting the openSUSE filesystems via
    Ubuntu. It's a text file. Unmount the filesystems after editing to
    flush the changes to disc. Then do a reboot from Ubuntu.
    --
    /"\ Bernd Felsche - Innovative Reckoning, Perth, Western Australia
    \ / ASCII ribbon campaign | Science is the belief in
    X against HTML mail | the ignorance of the experts.
    / \ and postings | -- Richard Feynman

  9. Re: After kernel update cannot boot into openSUSE

    On 2008-09-11, Claude Hopper wrote:
    > Godzilla wrote:
    >> The nice red update triangle told me that there were two security updates
    >> available, and one of them was a new kernel which required re-booting.
    >> After failing to accomplish this from the GUI updater, I went back to the
    >> CLI and did it there. Then, when I re-booted it would not enter openSUSE!
    >> Fortunately, my GRUB also has an UBUNTU choice, and that is where I am now.
    >>
    >> I would conjecture that the GRUB menu specified the former kernel, and now
    >> doesn't recognize the openSUSE 11.0 choice because it has a new kernel.
    >> How can I find out what the number of the new kernel is and where do I go
    >> to edit GRUB to put things back to normal?
    >>
    >> Thanks,

    >
    > Odd. I had no problem after the kernel update.


    I did. Intel core duo, 64-bit version, 8Gb memory, with Nvidia video.
    After the update it booted fine, but as it tried to start KDM, it
    crashed completely (black screen, no reaction on keyboard and no
    response trying a remote ssh login). It booted correctly on the
    second try, but it is still worrying.

    --- Jan

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