lost+found retrieval - Suse

This is a discussion on lost+found retrieval - Suse ; I need to retrieve data from a lost+found directory. Is there a way to do this, or is it looking file per file and guessing what the name was? houghi -- ________________________ Open your eyes, open your mind | proud ...

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  1. lost+found retrieval

    I need to retrieve data from a lost+found directory. Is there a way to
    do this, or is it looking file per file and guessing what the name was?

    houghi
    --
    ________________________ Open your eyes, open your mind
    | proud like a god don't pretend to be blind
    | trapped in yourself, break out instead
    http://openSUSE.org | beat the machine that works in your head

  2. Re: lost+found retrieval

    houghi wrote:

    > I need to retrieve data from a lost+found directory. Is there a way to
    > do this, or is it looking file per file and guessing what the name was?


    file *
    grep -i keyword *

  3. Re: lost+found retrieval

    houghi wrote:
    > I need to retrieve data from a lost+found directory. Is there a way to
    > do this, or is it looking file per file and guessing what the name was?
    >
    > houghi


    You basically do it by inspection. You may get some context information
    (e.g. directory names), but the rest is just a bunch of inode numbers.
    It's sort of an emergency, last ditch effort kind of thing anyhow.
    And just because you have found an orphan doesn't mean that is an
    entirely complete file... so, not everything is recoverable. There's
    quite a few variables in play.

  4. Re: lost+found retrieval

    Chris Cox wrote:
    >
    >
    > houghi wrote:
    >> I need to retrieve data from a lost+found directory. Is there a way to
    >> do this, or is it looking file per file and guessing what the name was?

    >
    > You basically do it by inspection. You may get some context information
    > (e.g. directory names), but the rest is just a bunch of inode numbers.
    > It's sort of an emergency, last ditch effort kind of thing anyhow.
    > And just because you have found an orphan doesn't mean that is an
    > entirely complete file... so, not everything is recoverable. There's
    > quite a few variables in play.


    OK, so in real life this would mean only parts of files can be retrieved
    and then only of they are text files.

    houghi
    --
    ________________________ Open your eyes, open your mind
    | proud like a god don't pretend to be blind
    | trapped in yourself, break out instead
    http://openSUSE.org | beat the machine that works in your head

  5. Re: lost+found retrieval

    houghi wrote:
    > Chris Cox wrote:
    >>
    >> houghi wrote:
    >>> I need to retrieve data from a lost+found directory. Is there a way to
    >>> do this, or is it looking file per file and guessing what the name was?

    >> You basically do it by inspection. You may get some context information
    >> (e.g. directory names), but the rest is just a bunch of inode numbers.
    >> It's sort of an emergency, last ditch effort kind of thing anyhow.
    >> And just because you have found an orphan doesn't mean that is an
    >> entirely complete file... so, not everything is recoverable. There's
    >> quite a few variables in play.

    >
    > OK, so in real life this would mean only parts of files can be retrieved
    > and then only of they are text files.


    Well... it's not quite that bad. Often times you'll get the whole
    file without corruption. Can be a real life saver. As someone also
    mentioned, you can use "file" (for example) to determine file types,
    also using a browser like Konqueror may give you a thumbnail preview
    that enables you to determine if the file needs to be kept. And of
    course there is size. I know when a person I was supporting
    deleted their VMware disk... we hard downed the platforms and
    fsck'd the disk and pulled the file out of the lost+found. He
    was quite relieved. We found the file easily.. it was the largest
    thing out there.

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